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A DICTIONARY 



OP 



THE NAMES OF MINERALS 



A DICTIONARY OF MINERAL NAMES. 

In this work the author has endeavored to give the history 
and etymology of every mineral name, including the following 
points : 

1st, the name correctly spelled; 

2d, its author; 

3d, a reference to its first publication; 

4th, its original spelling; 

5th, its derivation ; 

6th, the reason for choosing this particular name; 

7th, a short description. 

These particulars are fully given in most cases, but a number 
remain incomplete, and a list of such is given herewith, in the 
hope that information may bo elicited, to be used in a subsequent 
edition. The particular information wanted is noted agjiinst 
each name, the word 'author^ referring to the second point, 
' reference ' to the third, * derivation ' to the fifth, and ' reason ' 
to the sixth. 

Where * name ' is asked, it means that the given name or 
initials are wanted. 



Aurite. Adnnrs uame. 
Ajkite. Author, reference. 
Aiiiausite. Derivation of aniause. 
Amialite. Reference. 
Auagenite. Author, reference. 
Aricite. Author, reference. 
Arrhenite. Reference before 1873. 
Auralite. Reference before 1847. 
Bagotite. Author, reference. 
Bcckite. Beek's name. 
Bieirosite. Derivation. 
Breuunerite. Count Breunner's 

name. 
Cancriuite. Cancrin's name. 
Chalcochlore. Reference. 



Chanaralite. Reference before 1867. 

Cinnamite. Reference. 

Cooperite. Author, reference, de- 
rivation. 

Cramerile. Author, refererence, 
derivation. 

Davidsonite. Davidson's name. 

Devon ite. Reference. 

Dietrichite. Dietrich's name. 

E(!demite. Reason. 

Elhuyerite. Author. 

Euchysiderite. Author, reference. 

Euthalite. Reference. 

Fiedlerite. Fiedler's name. 

Forcherile. Forcher's uame. 



Fullonite. Author, reference, deri- 
vation. 

Funkite. Autbor, reference, deri- 
vation. 

Gaebhardtite. Autbor, reference, 
derivation. 

Glinkite. Gb'nka's name. 

Greenlandite. Reference. 

Hydrocinite. Autbor, reference 
before 1867. 

Ibleite. Ible's name. 

Illuderite. Derivation, reason. 

Jossaite. Jossa's name. 

Jun eke rite. Juncker's name. 

Jurinite. Reference. 

Kalipbite. Ivanofif's name, deriva- 
tion. 

Karamsinite. Karamsin's name. 

Karelinite. Karelin's name. 

Kieselaluminite. GrOnn in gen's 

name. 

Kirgbisite. Treutler's name. 

Knauffite. Planer's name, Knaufif's 
name. 

Koelbingite. Koelbing's name. 

Koodilite. Reference, derivation, 
reason. 

Kornellite. Derivation, reason. 

Krantzite. Krantz's name. 

Latialite. Reference before 1868. 

Lebuntite. Lebunt's name. 

Leu cocy elite. Reference before 
1839. 

Lillite. von Llll's name. 

Linarite. Autbor, reference before 
1839. 

Ludlamite. Ludlam*s name. 

Magnofranklinite. Reference. 

Margarite. Reference. 

Hariallte (vom Rath). Derivation, 
reason. 

Marialite (Ryllo). Reference. 

Martinsite. Martins' name. 

Mlascite. Wuttig's name, reference. 

Mofifrasite. de Mofifras' name. 

Monheimite. von Monbeim's name. 

Monradite. Monrad's name. 



Montmorillonite. Mauduyt's name. 
Morenosite. Moreno's name. 
Milllers-glass. Autbor, reference, 

derivation. 
Nadorite. Flajolot's name. 
Nantokite. Sieveking's name. 
Natrocalcite. Uttinger's name. 
Nefediefiite. Derivation, reason. 
Nitroglauberite. Schwartzemberg's 

name. 
Normalin. Derivation, reason. 
Ottrelite. Wolff's name. 
Paligorskite. Meaning of 'Paligo- 

riscben Distanz.' 
Pastreite. Pastre's name, Norman's 

name. 
Pelicanite. Derivation, reason. 
Perofskite. Perofski's name. 
Pinnoite. Pin no's name. 
Planerite. Planer's name. 
Prehnite. Prebn's name. 
Pruunerite. Prunner's name. 
Puschkinite. Pouchkin's name. 
Pyrotechnite. Derivation, reason. 
Rapbite. Reference before 1889. 
Raumite. Reference before 1863. 
Refikite. Lacava's name. 
Reinite. Rein's name. 
Riemannite. Riemann's name. 
Romanzovite. Romanzov's name. 
Samarskite. Samarski's name. 
Scaccbite (Palmieri). Reference. 
Schaffnerite. Viginer's name, 

Schaffner's name. 
Schatzellite. Scbatzell's name. 
Schueiderite. Schneider's name. 
SchOnite. SchSne's name. 
Scbutzite. Schutz' name. 
Schwartzembergite. Schwartzem- 
berg's name. 
Serpierite. Serpieri's name. 
Sinkanite. Reference, Croerning's 

name. 
Soimonite. Soimonov's name. 
Somervillite. Somerville's name. 
Sommaite. Reference. 
Sommarugaite. Author, reference. 



Stiberite. Reference before 1892. 
Stolzite. Stolz* Dame. 
Strontianite. Sulzer's name. 
Struvite. von Struve*s name. 
Szaibelyite. Szaibely's name. 
Szaskaite. Reference before 1867. 
Tankite (Haidinger). Tank's name. 
Thalakerite. Reference, deriva- 
tion. 
Thomaite. von Meyer's name. 
Thueuite. Author, reference. 
Tincalconite. Reference. 
Tomosite. Reference, derivation. 



Triphanite. Derivation. 
Tscheffkinite. Tschefif kin's name. 
Valaite. Vala's name. 
Vierzonite. Author, reference. 
Vietinghofite. Vietinghof's name, 

Lomonosov's name. 
Vilnite. Horodeki's name. 
Voigiite. Voigt's name. 
Volcknerite. Volckner's name. 
Wagite. Waga's name. 
Waltherite. Walther's name. 
Zoisitc. von Zeis' name. 
Zurlite. Zurlo's name. 



Information on any of these points, or notices of errors or 
omissions in the book, will be gratefully received and fully 
acknowledged by 

Prof. Albert H. Chester, 

Rutgers College, 
New Brunswick, N. J., U. S. A. 



A Dictionary of the Names of Minerals, including their History 
and Etymology. By Prof. Albert H. Chester. 8vo, cloth, $3.50. 

Published by John Wiley & Sons., 53 East Tenth Street, 
New York City, and Chapman & Hall, Limited, 11 Henrietta 
•Street, Covent Garden, London W. C, England. 



A DICTIONARY 



OV THE 



NAMES OF MINERALS 



XNOLUDINa 



THEIR HISTORY AM) ETYMOLOGY 



BY 

ALBERT HUNTINGTON CHESTER 

E.M. Ph.D. Sc.D. 
Frofemor of MineraSogy in Butffen CdUeffe 



FIRST EDITION 
FIRST THOUSAND 



NEW YORK: 

JOHN WILEY & SONS. 
London : CHAPMAN & HALL, Limited. 

1896. 



NAT SCI 

.C53 



Copyright 1806 

BT 

ALBERT H. CHESTEB 



BDBXBT DRUMVOND, ELBCTROTYPEB AND PRINTER, NEW YORK. 



So MS tttttd anV lotifl^tftne colleaflttr^ 

Dr. EDWARD NORTH of Hamilton College, 

IN GRATEFUL REMEMBRANCE OF HIS KINDLY 
INTEREST IN IT, THIS BOOK 
IS AFFECTIONATELY 
DEDICATED 



INTRODUCTION* 



The study of mineral names is an interesting one, not only from the 
mineralogist's point of view, as affording an insight into the growth and 
development of this branch of science, but also to the student of human 
nature, for many traits of character are shown in the various considerations 
which have determined the particular name to be adopted. 

We sometimes find as the reason for a name the simple idea of distin- 
guishing the thing itself; but this is not the most common reason. To do 
honor to some person who may perhaps be pleased or flattered by the atten- 
tion, or to immortalize some place, often otherwise obscure or unknown, is 
a much more common reason. Names have been given to commemorate 
battle-fields, to sneer at the work of earlier investigators, and as a tribute 
to feminine loveliness. In short the whole round of human passions has 
been gone over in the manufacture of these words, which are purely scien- 
tific in their uses, and for the making of which scientific methods might 
well have been employed. The subject has also no little interest from the 
philological side, and these names deserve stady if only as part of our 
language. 

One of the most noticeable things about mineral names is the lack of 
uniformity in their terminations. While the large majority of them end 
in -ite, there are many in -ine, while -ane, -ase, -ose, and several others 
have been often used. It is to be regretted that the termination -ite has 
not been universally adopted, for it has been so far adopted as to be the 
generally accepted one for such names. It has the sanction of antiquity, 
for it was used by the old Greek writers in the forms -ites or -itis, as in 
ai/iariTTfi, 'hematite,' and dXa/Saaririi, 'alabaster.' Such forms were 
also used by the Romans, and we have in Pliny siderites, Modestone,* 
steatitis, 'soapstone,' molochites, 'malachite,' and many others. These 
forms are undoubtedly the source of the termination -ite now in use, as 
they are the earliest known terminations. Such names were given by the 
ancients as noting some property or use of the mineral, or sometimes desig 

* Much of this introduction is to be found in my paper on * The Origin and History 
of MinenUogical Names,* read before the New Yoric Academy of Sciences on January 
25, 1898, and published in vol. xi, pp. 49 to 57, of its Transactions. 

vii 



vm INTROD UCTION 

nating its source, or the locality from which it was derived; as uayv^rts, 
a mineral from Magnesia. Or, to speak of those already mentioned, 
aiudrirrfS is a mineral resembling blood, so called from the color of its 
powder; dXaflaariTiS, a mineral from which a vessel called an alabastron 
was cut; siderites, from aidrfpo^, 'iron,' because it contains it; steatitis, 
from orearoS, *of fat,' because it feels greasy; and molochites, from 
ijiaXdxv* * mallows,' alluding to its green color. In the 5th edition of his 
great work on Mineralogy, Prof. J. D. Dana makes an attempt at uniform- 
ity of nomenclature by changing the terminations of many names into ite, 
particularly those ending in -ine, only leaving those unchanged which had 
come into too general use in the language to be so treated. So we have 
galenite, alabandite, pyrrhotite, and periclasite, instead of galena, alaban- 
dine, pyrrhotine, and periclase. These changes have been generally 
adopted, and are all in the right direction. 

In 1876 Prof. C. U. Shepard published a ' Catalogue of Minerals found 
within about 75 miles of Amherst College, Mass.,' in which he proposed 
that the names of all acknowledged mineral species, except those of the 
elements and a very few more, shall uniformly end in -ite, and that the 
termination -ine shall as uniformly be used for all variety names, and those 
whose specific character is not fully settled. Accordingly, he gives us 
gypsite, serpentite, wadite, orthoclasite, spodumenite, epidotite, and many 
similar changes, while marmolite, picrolite, nacrite, and others are made 
to end in ine, marmoline, picroline, nacrine. It is hardly necessary to say 
that these suggestions have not-been generally or fully accepted. 

The use of the termination -lite, in German -lith, from the Greek \iSoi, 
*& stone,' ought here to be mentioned, as it was a genuine attempt to intro 
duce a distinguishing mark for mineral names, which, if successful, would 
have been of great benefit to mineral nomenclature, as bringing in the 
desirable element of uniformity. This also comes from antiquity, being 
found in the Greek. But it never came into general use, and in later years 
is seldom used except for euphony. There is an erroneous impression 
that the termination -ite is derived from this, which, as we have seen, is 
not the case, as it is a much older form. 

As all scientific works were written in Latin up to a very recent date, 
and as there was no chemistry to show differences in composition, there 
was no real progress in mineralogy. External characters alone were used 
as means of distinguishing minerals from each other, and those that looked 
alike must necessarily be classed together. Pliny's names were sufficient 
for all the uses of the science down to the sixteenth century. There was 
hai-dly a name added, even by Agricola, whose large works were published 
1629 to 1546. The name fluor is perhaps his only new one, and that he 



INTROD UCTION IX 

probably (lid not originate, but took from the vocabulary of the furnace- 
men, who used fluor-spar in smelting their ores. Certain minerals in general 
use had their common names in various languages, but there were few of 
them. 

Several attempts have been made to give systematic names to minerals 
on some such principle as is used in other branches of natural science, but 
not one of them has been generally ((Qopted, and all have by degrees been 
dropped. One of the earliest of these was by Sir John Hill, in his * History 
of Fossils,' London, 1748. He divides minerals into numbered series, 
classes, and orders, and under these into named genera and species. His 
genus names are many of them new, but are sometimes older names modi- 
fled to suit his system. For instance, Marmora, for the marbles. A good 
example of his new names, and also of the way tn which species were 
multiplied when only external characteristics were considered, is in the 
order of Inflammables. The 8d class is called Phlogonise, and under this 
we have as the 1st genus, Pyricubia, and under this two species: 1st, 
Pyricubium maximum foliaceum, and 2d, Pyricubium solidum minus. 
The flrst of these species is simply those cubical crystals of iron pyrites 
which are striated by an oscillation towanl a hemitetrahexahedron, and 
the second is the unstriated crystals of the same. Octahedral pjrrite is 
made another genus, and dodecahedral is still another. Several more 
genera are made trom what is now the one species. This system never 
came into general use, and Hill himself gives it up and adopts one much 
more simple in his later work entitled 'Fossils Arranged according to 
their Obvious Characters,' London, 1771. 

In 1820 Prof. Mohs brought out a small book entitled ' The Characters 
of the Classes, Orders, Genera, and Species; or the Characteristic of the 
Natural History System of Mineralogy. Intended to enable students to 
discriminate minerals on principles similar to those of Botany and Qeology.' 
This system is more fully presented in his larger work of 1822-4, trans- 
lated by Haidinger in 1825. He uses genus and species names for each 
mineral, and sometimes adds a third for more exact distinction. Under 
the genus garnet he gives Pyramidal Garnet, or idocrase; Dodecahedral 
Garnet, or true garnet; and Prismatoidal Garnet, or staurolite. Dioptase 
liecomes Rhombohedral Emerald- Malachite. This system was quite popu- 
lar for a time, and had several imitators. Prof. C. U. Shepard adopts 
Mohs's system, and in the flrst edition of his mineralogy, 1882-5, he not 
only uses his names, but extends the system still further. He, however, 
gives flrst the common or trivial names, as they are called, and always uses 
them in speaking of species. Microlite is the one new species of his own 
noted in this book, which under the system he calls Octahedral Tungstic- 



X INTRODUCTION 

'Baryte, and similar names are carried all the way through. None of these 
names are mentioned in his third edition, 1852-7. 

In 1836 Prof, J. D. Dana read a paper before the New York Lyceum 
of Natural History, entitled ' A New Mineral Nomenclature/ in which he 
presents a complete arrangement according to the Natural History method, 
and gives some very good reasons for its adoption. This system is carried 
out in full in the first edition, 1837, of his Mineralogy. He uses in general 
two names for each mineral, as Andalusius prismaticus for andalusite, but 
he gives the common name first in all cases. In his second edition, 1844^ 
he retains these Latin names as the scientific ones, and as necessary to * a 
systematic idea of the science,' but adds, p. 135, 'the shorter trivial names 
should however be retained, as more convenient for common use.' In the 
third edition, 1850. however. Prof. Dana discards the whole system, not 
even retaining the names as synonyms. A system of arrangement is 
adopted that was understood to be temporary, while at the end of the work 
a chemical classification is suggested. In the later editions this last has 
been perfected, and we now have an arrangement easy of reference and 
answering all purposes of classification, but from which all traces of the 
double Latinized forms of the Natural History methods have disappeared. 
This or some similar system is now generally followed by writers on miner- 
alogy, much to the satisfaction of those who use their works. In 1847 
Glocker published his work entitled ' Gtenerum et Specierum Mineralium 
Synopsis.' This is perhaps the most successful attempt at a systematic 
nomenclature that has been made. He uses in general a Latinized form of 
the common name for the name of each species, with some descriptive 
word added. For varieties he adds a third word, as is common in other 
branches of natural history. For instance, imder Granatus, garnet, he 
gives three species: 1st, Granatus nobilis, precious garnet; 2d, Granatus- 
hyacinthinus, cinnamon garnet; and 3d, Granatus vulgaris, common 
garnet, and under the latter he uses for varieties the terminations fuscus,. 
niger, viridis, flavus, and albidus. The work is in Latin, thus going back 
to the style of the scientific books of the last century. Recently Prof. T. 
Sterry Hunt has devised a new Natural System, suggested indeed as early 
as 1853, but as he. gives few new species names a discussion of it would be 
out of place here. His work is, however, exceedingly interesting, and will 
well repay examination by those who care to go further into that side of 
che general subject. 

In 1728 Dr. John Woodward published a work entitled ' Fossils of all 
Rinds Digested into a Method, Suitable to their Mutual Relations and 
Affinity,' but it is a description from external characters only, and can 
hardly be called a scientific treatise. The first one that really deserve8> 



INTRODUCTION 

such a name is by the Swedish mineralogist Wallerius, in 1747, which is 
arranged on a scientific plan, and gives us the earliest systematic descrip- 
tion of minerals. Cronstedt, another Swedish chemist, ten years later gave 
us a work of much greater value, as he brought in chemical relations, as 
far as was possible in the crude state of that science. But few new names 
were added, for the study was still largely from the external side, and new 
species could not be recognized. With the discovery of oxygen in 1776, 
and the real beginning of the science of chemistry, a more correct basis for 
the differentiation of mineral species was found. This was aided by the 
application of scientific crystallography, the first edition of de L'Isle's work 
appearing in 1772, and the second, in four volumes, in 1788. From this 
date new names were given to minerals as the result of more extended 
research in this branch of study, and one of the first of these was prehnite, 
given by Werner to a mineral brought from the Cape of Good Hope by 
Colonel Prehn, and hence named after him. Werner first announced the 
name in his lectures in 1788, as he himself states later, but it was not pub- 
lished for several years. In 1789 there is an article in the Journal de 
Physique, by Sage, objecting to the use of names of persons for minerals, 
the text for which is this name of Werner's. But the name has kept its 
place, and is now the accepted one for the species. Other names, given 
about the same time after persons, are witherite, after Dr. Withering, who 
first described it, and torberite, later changed to torbemite, after Torbem 
Bergmann, its first analyst. This latter mineral has gone through various 
vicissitudes as to its name, and a list of them, as an illustration, may not be 
out of place here; they are taken from the 5th edition of Dana's Mineral- 
ogy, p. 686: Mica viridis, 1772; Chalkolith, 1788; Torberite, 1793; Uran- 
glimmer, 1800; Torbernit, 1803; Uranite, 1814; Uranphyllit, 1820; Cupro- 
uranit, 1865. 

The author's study of the history of mineral names was begun in the 
interest of Murray's New English Dictionary, where these names are con- 
sidered as words simply, and part of the language as found in books. The 
information sought with reference to each is 1st, the author of the name; 
2d, the date of its first publication; 8d, a reference to the original publica- 
tion; 4th, its first form, if different from the one now used by English 
writers; 6th, its derivation; 6th, the reason for the name; 7th, a short 
description, sufficient to identify it, particularly if the name has been used 
for more than one species or variety. A good example is Erinite, a name 
given by W. Haidinger, 1828, Ann. Phil., 2d, iv, 154, from Erin, because 
it was supposed to have been found in Ireland. It is a green, fibrous, arse- 
niate of copper. This description is necessary to distinguish it from Erinite 
of 7. Thomson, 1886, Thom. Min., i, 342, derived also from Erin, for the 



XU INTRODUCTION 

same reason, and properly so, for it came from Ireland. But this is a 
reddishp clay-like mineral from the Giant's Causeway, and probably does 
not merit a name at all. 

Full information about many naiucs is easily obtained, and is usually 
to be found in the last edition of Dana's Mineralogy, up to 1892. But with 
reference to a considerable number of names the information wanted is not 
easy to obtain, and in some cases perhaps it cannot be found at all. When 
it is not given in Dana's Mineralogy, the student may be sure that he must 
search to find it. This is particularly true of obsolete names, information 
about which must often be sought in the earlier volumes of scientific 
journals. The first publication of T Taylar*B name killinite is in 1818, in 
vol. xiii, p. 4, of the Transactions of the Royal Irish Academy, a fact not 
given in any work on mineralogy. There are some names also about 
whi&h very erroneous ideas as to derivation prevail, and which need cor- 
rection. The name chabazite was given in the form chabasie, by Bosc 
d Antic, 1780, Jour. d'Hist., il, 181, and is derived from x^^P^^^o^* the 
name given to one of the stones mentioned in the Orphic poem ' Ilepi 
XiBov,* The name as we now have it in the poem is ;t^^<^Cto?, and the 
mineral should therefore have been called chalazite. Eidd called attention 
to the blunder in 1809, Eidd Min., i, 249; but the original name has held 
its place. It is but fair to say that the form x^flo^Z^oi was used in the 
current editions of the poem at the time the name was applied. The deri- 
vation of the word datholite has often been incorrectly given. It is really 
a corruption of the original name datolith, given by Esmark in 1806, from 
ddreojiicxt, to divide, alluding to the granular structure of one of its 
varieties, and Xtdoi. Werner added the h for no apparent reason, and the 
changed form was adopted by most authors until Prof. Dana, in 1868, un- 
riddled the matter and gave it its correct form again. But wise writers 
have tried to find another derivation for it, and one author of note says it 
is from ddBoi, which he says means turbid, because the mineral is not 
clear and transparent. A wiser one says there is no such Greek word as 
ddSoi, which is true, and that it is from the compound word da-BoXXoi, 
meaning very turbid, because it is never found in transparent crystals, 
which is no more a proper derivation than the other. The word feldspar 
has been changed into felspar for no better reason than that the latter form 
was thought the right one. It was used by Wallerius in his Mineralogy % 

of 1747, p. 65, in the Swedish form felt-spat, meaning fieldspar. It did not 
originate with him probably, but may have been a popular name in his time. 
Da Costa used it in 1757, Nat. Hist. Fossils, 287, in the German form feld- 
spath, and this form was current until 1794, when we find in Eirwan's 
Mineralogy, vol. i, p. 817, the following note: 'This name seems to oe 



INTRODUCTION xiil 

deriyed from fels, a rock, it buing commouly found ia granites, and not 
from feld, a field; and hence I write it thus, felspar.' This assumption of 
Eirwan has been taken for fact by all English writers, and the corrupt 
form is in very general use. Another interesting cose is that of the name 
pyroxene, which is popularly supposed to have been given, from nvp, 
*fire/ and ^dvoi^ 'a stranger,' in the idea that it is of mre occurrence 
among volcanic rocks, while in fact Hntly expressly states, 1801, HaQy 
Min., ii, 64, that it is very abundant among the volcanic matters of Vesu- 
vius, Etna, etc., but is there as a stranger, the name expressing that it 
is not in its native place, but existed in the nou-volconic rocks which 
furnished the original material of the lava. 

Authors often omit giving the reason for adopting a name. Where it 
is on account of some characteristic of the mineral, its author often takes 
it for granted that it is as evident to others as to himself. The name 
coracite, J. L. L$ Conte, A. J. S.. 2d, iii, 117, is a case in point. Le Conte 
does not give any derivation, but it is the name of a pitch-black variety of 
uraninite, and is probably derived from Kopa^, a raven. A similar case is 
that of adinole, Beud. Min.. 1882, ii, 126. No derivation is given, but it 
may easily be conjectured from the description that it is from ddiyoi, * com- 
pact.' But there are other cases where there is nothing suggestive in the 
description, and even conjecture is at fault. Such conjectures if stated as 
such are of value, but to give them as facts, as has often been done, is cer- 
tainly a serious blunder, if not something worae. In one of the large dic- 
tionaries we find the name acanticone derived as follows: from 'Greek 
ctK^, point, drri, against, and kSvo?, cone.' This is a mere guess. The 
name was given by B, J. d'Andrada, 1800, Jour, de Phys., ii, 240, in the 
form akanthicone, and is derived from txK(XvbU, a gold-finch, and kovux, 
powder, because the color of the powdered mineral is yellow. A similar 
blunder is made with the name alvite, so called after one of its localities, 
Alve, Norway. lu the dictionary it is said to be derived from alvus, 
the belly. Another instance of a mistaken derivation is that of coreite. an 
obsolete synonym of agalmatolite, popularly supposed to be from Corea, 
probably because agalnutolite is from China, and Corea is close by. , The 
name was given by J, C. Delamet^ierie in 1795. and he derives it from 
Xoipeioi, ' of a swine,' because of its greasy appearance. He at first calls 
it koireiite, but changed it to koreiite, and then to koreite, which has since 
been changed to its present form, resembling one derived from the name 
Corea. But the name should be choireiite, commencing with eh. 

Sometimes errors of the compositor have failed of correction, and these 
spurious words have found their way into later books as real names. One 
of these is glorikite, 1859, Duf. Min., iii, 826, which is an error for glinkite. 



XIV INTRODUCTION 

Gibsonite, in the 1847 edition of tbe same work, iii, 761, is probably an 
error for gibbsite, but this is not so clear. Gkiladsite, galadstite, and galad- 
tite are all printer's errors for galaktite. 

A curious case of this sort is seen in the various forms of the word 
didymite. It was announced by G, E. Schaufhautl in 1843 from didv/iios, 
a twin, because it was thought to be a second silicate containing calcium 
carbonate as part of its composition. The form was by some blunder given 
as didrimite, but this was soon changed by the author himself to the cor- 
rectly derived form, didymite, the original v being properly changed to y. 
Of this word you will find in the books four different forms, only one of 
which deserves any place in mineralogy. 

Breithaupt gave the name kupholit, from xov<po?, light, and \iBoS, to 
a very light variety of serpentine. He leaves out the o of the original 
word, probably because the word koupholite had been used before, being 
an obsolete synonym of prehnite. This was first changed to kuphoite and 
then to cyphoite, which gives little idea of its original derivation and 
meaning. 

Many more instances might be cited, but enough has been said to show 
how much confusion has arisen through carelessness or unwarrantable 
assumption, and how desirable it is that it should be disentangled as far as 
possible. 

In this work the endeavor is made to give complete information, as 
outlined above, concerning all the names that have ever been introduced 
into the nomenclature of Mineralogy. Nearly all published works on this 
subject have been searched to prepare a complete list of such names, and all 
available sources of information have been consulted. Many facts have 
been received in private communications from correspondents at home and 
abroad,, a list of whose names is appended. But a number of blanks still 
remain, after years of research, and the author greatly desires information 
on any of the points lacking. 

A number of personal names are not given in full. The use of the 
surname only has been common with foreign writers, and in some early 
cases it is perhaps now impossible to complete them. One of these is that 
of Uttinger, author of the name natrocalcite. A recent and very re- 
markable case is that of the late Adam, of Paris, author of the * Tab- 
leau Mineralogique,' Paris, 1869, and an honorary member of the Societe 
Mineralogique de Prance at the time of his death in 1881. The most per- 
sistent effort has failed to disclose his full name. In answer to a letter of 
inquiry on the subject the venerable Prof. Des Cloizeaux, his life-long 
friend, says: ' M. Adam est mort tr^s vienx, laissant une reniarquable 
collection de mineraux ^ I'Scole des Mines de Paris. II a toujours occupe 



INTRODUCTION XV 

de hautes situations au Ministdre des Finauces et personne, & ma coDDais- 
sance, n'a jamais connu »on ou sm prenoms. C'diait Monsieur Adam et 
cela sufflsait & tous ceux qui Tont connu.' 

Words have not been inserted under every change of spelling, but only 
those necessary to a complete understanding of each case. Some of the 
variations between c and k, i and y, and e, 8 and t have been omitted. 
>l either have forms in other languages been included where they are 
simple translations of the English names. Chemical names are also left 
out, except such as have the sanction of use as actual mineral names. By 
this means the number has been kept down to the four thousand six hundred 
and twenty-seven names here given, without omitting, unless by oversight, 
any that should be found in a work of this character. 

Following the Dictionary proper is an Index to the Authors of Mineral 
Names, which it is believed will be found of interest, as showing just what 
names each one has given. It has been found exceedingly useful in the 
preparation of this work. 

Albert H. Chbsteb. 

Naw Bbonswick, N. J., January 1, 1806. 



CORRESPONDENTS 



Thb author is indebted to the following gentlemen for vahiable 
information: 

£mlle Bertrand, Mining Engineer, Paris, France; Louis Bevier, Jr., 
Prof, of Greek, Rutgers College, New Brunswick, N. J.; Dr. Eugen 
Blasius, University of Berlin, Germany; C. W. Blomstrand, Prof, of 
Chemistry, University of Lund, Sweden; Dr. H. Carrington Bolton, New 
York, N. Y. ; L. Bombicci, Prof, of Mineralogy, University of Bologna, 
Italy; H. C. G. Brandt, Prof, of Modern Languages^ Hamilton College, 
Clinton, N. Y.; John H. Caswell, New York, N. Y.; E. J. Cbapmaii, Prof, 
of Mineralogy, University of Toronto, Canada, Henry N. Cobb, D.D., 
New York, N. Y. ; A. M. Cochran, (Gainesville, Ga. ; Jacob Cooper, Prof, 
of Greek, now of Philosophy, Rutgers College, New Brunswick, N. J. ; 
E. L. Cowles, Chester, Mass.; Antonio d'Achiardi, Prof, of Mineralogy, 
University of Pisa, Italy; Prof. A. Damour, Paris, France; Edward S. 
Dana, Prof, of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Conn.; James D. 
Dana, Prof, of Geology, Yale University, New Haven, Conn. ; Prof. A. Des 
Cloizeaux, Paris, France; V. Dokuchaer, Prof, of Mineralogy, University 
of St. Petersburg, Russia, E. J. Dunn, Director of the Geol. Survey of 
Victoria, Kew, Victoria; E. Durand, Engineer, Paris, France; George L. 
English, New York, N. Y. ; L. Fletcher, British Museum, London, Eng. ; A. 
E. Foote, M.D., Philadelphia, Pa.; Henri Forir, Mining Engineer, Liege, 
Belgium; Serge Glinka, University of St. Petersburg, Russia; F. Gonnard, 
Engineer, Lyons, France; C. L. Griesbach, Director of the Geol. Survey 
of India, Calcutta; P. Groth, Prof, of Mineralogy, University of Munich, 
Bavaria; Dr. J. Grlinling, University of Munich, Bavaria; C. W. von 
Gttmbel, Director Geol. Survey of Bavaria, Munich, Bavaria; Frank W. 
Hall, Dahlonega, Ga.; George B. Hanna, U. S. Assay Office, Charlotte, 
N. C; Samuel Haughton, Prof, of Mineralogy, Trinity College, Dublin, 
Ireland; M. Forster Heddle, Prof, of Chemistry, University of St. An- 
drews, Scotland; Albert Heim, Prof, of Geology, University of Zurich, 
Switzerland; A. Heinz, Prof, of Botany, Agram, Austria; Otto Helm, 
Danzig, Germany; Prof. G. G. Henderson, Glasgow, Scotland; G. C. 
Hoffman, Geol. Survey of Canada, Ottawa; T. H. Holland, Geol. Survey 

xvi 



CORRESPONDENTS XVU 

of India, Calcutta; A. HQbner, Hattenmeister, Freiberg, Saxooy; Robert 
Hunter, D.D., Loughton, Essex, Eng.; L. J. IgelstrOm, Sunnemo, Werm- 
land, Sweden; H. [C. Johnstrup, Copenhagen, Denmark; J. H. Klooe, 
Prof, of Mineralogy and Geology, Polytechnic School, Braunschweig, 
Germany; G. A. Eoenig, Prof, of Chemistry, Michigan Mining School, 
Houghton, Mich.; George F. Eunz, Mineralogist, New York, N. Y.; A. 
Lacroix, Prof, of Mineralogy, Museum of Natural History, Paris, France; 
H. Laspeyres, Prof, of Geology, University of Bonn, Germany; Albert R. 
Leeds, Prof, of Chemistry, Stevens Institute, Hoboken, N. J.; A. Liver- 
sidge, Prof, of Chemistry, University of Sydney, New South Wales; 
Stanislas Meunier, Prof, of Geology, Museum of Natural History, Paris, 
France; Carl Meyer, Prof, of German, Rutgers College, New Brunswick, 
N. J.; Edward W. Morley, Prof, of Chemistry, Adelbert College, Cleve- 
land, O. ; A. J. Moses, Prof, of Mineralogy, Columbia College, New 
York, N. Y.; Edward J. Nolan, Librarian of the Academy of Natural 
Science, Philadelphia, Pa.; Baron A. E. NordenskiOld, Director of the 
Royal Mineralogical Museum, Stockholm, Sweden; Edward North, 
Prof, of Greek, Hamilton College, Clinton, N. Y.; Carl Ochsenius, 
Mining Engineer, Marburg, Germany; W. T. Ormiston, Prof, of Chem- 
istry, Robert College, Constantinople; Dr. Anton Pelikan, Vienna, Austria; 
F. Pisani, Paris, France; S. L. Penfield, Prof, of Mineralogy, Yale Uni- 
versity, New Haven, Conn.; J. F. Rose, M.D., Oxford, Pa.; F. von Sand- 
berger. Prof, of Mineralogy, University of Wilrzburg, Germany; Eugenic 
Scacchi, Prof, of Mineralogy, University of Naples, Italy; A. Schrauf, 
Prof, of Mineralogy, University of Vienna, Austria; William Semmons, 
London, Eng.; Prof. C. U. Shepard, Summerville, S. C; H. Sjdgren, 
Prof, of Mineralogy, University of Upsala, Sweden; K. J. V. Steenstrup, 
Prof, of Mineralogy, University of Copenhagen. Denmark; C. A. Stetefeldt, 
Mining Engineer, Oakland, Cal.; Johannes Walther, Prof, of Geology, 
University of Jena, Germany; Albin Weisbach, Prof, of Mineralogy, 
Mining Academy, Freiberg, Saxony; F. J. Wlik, Prof, of Mineralogy, Uni- 
yersity of HelslDgfora, Finland; Dr. Henry Wurtz, New York, N. Y. 



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S. Singer. WUrzburg. 1879. 
mdg. Cont. Min. Contributions to Swedish Mineralogy. Hj. Sjogren. 

Upsala, 1895. Reprint from Bull, of the Geol. Inst, of Upsala. 
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POrhandlingar. Stockholm, 1839-68. 
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Proceedings, 1865-. 
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Journal, 1858-. 

Proceedings, 1764-75. 
Boc. Oeol. Belg. Soci^t^ G6ologique de Belgique. Li6ge. 

Annales, 1875-. 

Bulletin, 1875-. 



XXXVi TITLES OF THE WORKS CITED 

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Atti, ISeO-. 
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Memoires, 1806-. 

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Steff. Orykt, Handbuch der Oryktognosie. H. Steflena. 8 vols., Halle^ 

1811, 1815, 1819. 

Supplemeut, 1824. 
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Fr. Stromeyer. GOttingen, 1821. 
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a. M., 1807-24. 
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315 B.C. John Hill. London, 1774. 
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mineralogy in each edition. 
Thorn, Min. Outlines of Mineralogy. Geology and Mineral Analysis. 

T. Thomson. 2 vols., London, 1836. 
Tor. Ae. Rcale Accademia della Scienze. Torino. 

Atti. I860-. 
TseTur. Min. Lehrbuch der Mineralogie. G. Tschermak. Wien, 1881;. 

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Tab, Gea. Vaterlftndische Gesellschaft der Arzte und Naturforscher 

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Denkschriften, 1805. 
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Ofversigt af forhandlingar, 1844-. 

Bihnng, 1872-. 



TITLES OF THE WORKS CITED XXXVU 

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WalL VuL fiber die vulkanischen Gcsteine in Sicilien und Island. 

W. S. von Waltersliausen. QOttingen, 1853. 
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Wm, Byn. Synopsis Mineralogica. A. Weisbach. Freiberg, 1875. 
Wern, Cranst, Cronstedt's Versuch einer Mineralogie, Ubersetzt von 

A. G. Werner. Freiberg, 1780. 
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* 

Zi. Nat, Hatte, Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein. 

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•er., 1882-40. 



ABBREVIATIONS 



In addition to ordinary and well-understood abbreyiations the follow- 
ing special ones are here used: 

f.. . • • from, referring to deriTatioD. 

isl island or islands. 

obs obsolete. 

priv. com private communication. 

uyn synonym. 

▼ar variety. 

In the abbreviated references ordinal numbers refer to series, Roman 
numerals to volumes, and Arabic naraerals to pages unless otherwise 
stated. Numbers or letters in parenthesis mean parts, and the numbers 
immediately following the authors' names, which are always in italics, are 
the dates. If the original reference has not been accessible, it is enclosed 
m brackets, and a second reference which has been verified follows im- 
mediately. Where the original form of the name differs from its present 
English form, it is given in parenthesis immediately after the reference. 
Thus: 'MOROZITB. P. C. Abildgaard, [1798, Moll Jahrb., ii, 482]. 
1803, Reuss Min., ii, (2), 349 (Moroxit),' means that the name Moroxite was 
given by Abildgaard in 1798, and first appeared in von Moirs JahrbUcher 
der Berg- und Httttenkunde, volume ii, page 432, according to Reuss' 
Lehrbuch der Mineralogie, 1802, volume ii, part 2, page 349. where it is 

spelled Morozit 

zzzviii 



A DICTIONAKY 



OF THB 



NAMES OF MINERALS 



AARITB. — ^(tom, 1809, Adam Tab., 40, f. Mt Aar, France, its 
locality. Changed to arite to make it conform with Ar, the spelling of 
the recent maps. A Tar. of niccolite containing a large proportion of 
antimony. 

ABIOHITB. J. J, Bernhardt, 1889, Glock. Min., 579 (Abichit), in 
honor of Dr. W. H. Abich. An obs. syn. of clinoclasite. 

ABRAZTTB. 8. BreUlak, 1818, Inst. Qeol., iii, 98, f. a intensive, 
and fipdZeiv, ' to boil,' because it intumesces before the blowpipe. An 
obe. syn. of gismondite. 

ABRIAOHANITB. M, F, Heddle, 1879, Min. Mag., iii, 61, f. 
Abriachan, Scotland, its locality. A var. of crocidolite containing 
magnesia, and looking like blue clay. 

AOADIAUTE. F. Alger and a T. Jaekwn, 1843, Phil. Mag., 3d, 
xzii, 193 (acadiolite), f. Acadie, the old name of Nova Scotia, and Xi^oi, 
' a stone.' A reddish var. of cbabazite, from Nova Scotia. 

AOADIOUTB. See acadialite. 

AOANTHIOONB. See acanticone. 

AOANTHITB. A, KenngoU, 1855, Pogg. Ann., zcv, 463 (Akan- 
thit), f. aKavBa, *a thorn,' in allusion to the shape of its crystals. Sul- 
phide of silver found in brilliant black crystals which are usually slender 
pointed prisms. 

AOANTHOIDE. A, Dvfrenoy, 1847, Duf. Mfai., iii, 747, f. aKavBcc, 
'a thorn,' in allusion to the shape of its crystals. An obscure min 
eral near breislakite. 

AOANTIOONE. B, J, d*Andrada, 1800, Jour, de Phys., 11, 240 



AOANTIOONITB 2 AOT7NOUN 

(akanthicone), f. aKavBii, 'a goldfinch/ and Kovia, 'powder/ alluding 
to the color of the powdered mineral. An obs. syn. of epidote. 

AOANTIOONITB. Variant of acanticone. 

AOERDE8E. F. 8. BeudanU 18d2, Beud. Min., ii. 678. f. aKepdifi, 
'unprofitable/ because it was considered of little use in the arts. An 
obs. syn. of manganite. 

AOHIRITE. B. F, J. v. Hermann, 1802, Nov. Ac. Pet., xiii, 839. after 
Achir Mahmed, who brought it to Europe. An obs. syn. of dioptase. 

AOHMATITE. R, Hermann, 1845-6, Min. Qes. St. Pet.. 202 (Ach- 
matit). f. Achmatovsk. Urals, its locality. An obs. syn. of epidote. 

AOHMTTB. See acmltc. 

AOHREMATITE. J. W. MaUeU 1876. A. J. S.. 8d. xi. 158. f. 
dxpvMdroi, 'without money.' because it does not contain silver, as 
alleged. A molybdo-arsenate of lead, found in resinous masses of a 
brown color. 

AOHROITE. R. Hermann, 1845, Jour. Pk. Ch., xxxv. 282 (Achroit), 
f. axpota, 'want of color.' The colorless var. of tourmaline. 

AOHTARAQDITE. E. F. G locker, 1847, Clock. Syn., 805 (Achta- 
ragdit), f. the Achtaragda River, Russia, its locality. A clay which 
soils the fingers like chalk, occurring in pseudomorphous crystals. 

AOHTARANDITE. Error for achtaragdite. 

AOIOULAR BISMUTH. R. Jameson, 1820, Jam. Min.. iii, 881; 
80 named in allusion to the shape of its crystals. A syn. of aikinite. 

AOIOUIilTE. J. Nicoh 1849. Nicol Min.. 487, f. acicula. 'needle- 
shaped.' alhiding to the shape of its crystals. An obs. syn. of aikinite. 

AOMITE. F. Stromeyer, 1821. Vet. Ak. Stock., 160 (Achmit), f. 
aKtiif, ' a point.' in allusion to the shape of its crystals. A silicate of iron 
and sodium, occurring in pointed black crystals. Variant of achmite, 
and now the most used form. 

AOORITB. Variant of azorite. f. A9ore8. the Portuguese form. 

AORUSITB. Error for cerusite. 

AOTINOUTB. R, Kirwan, 1794. Elrw. Min.. i, 167 (actynolite). f. 
a.KTi';, 'a ray.' alluding to its occurrence in fibrous crystals, and Af9o?» 
and taken from A. 0. Werner's earlier name, Strahlstein. A var. of 
amphibole of bright green to grayish-green color, and often occurring in 
fibrous crystals. 

AOTINOTB. R. J, Hauy, 1797, Jour, des M.. v, 268, f. aVrf vaJroJ, 
' rayed.' A syn. of actinolite. 

AOTTNOLIN. Variant of actynolite. C, V. Shepard, 1876, Shep. 
Gat. Min., uses the termination 'in' for varieties, using Mte' for inde- 
pendent species only. 



AOTTNOUTB 8 ABRINmi 

AOTTNOIiITII. The earliest form of the name, the more correct 
form, actinolite, now being generally used. 

ADAMANT. From ddd^a%, 'invincible.' An old name for any 
hard stone, more particularly the diamond and corundum. 

ADAMANTINB SPAR. B, Kirtoan, 1794, Eirw. Miu., i, 835, 
referring to its hardness. A syn. of corundum. 

ADABfflNB. See adamite. 

ADAMTTB. G. FreuUl, 1866, C. R.. Ixii, 692 (Adamine), in honor 

of Adam, of Paris. Hydrous arsenate of zinc, of a honey-yellow 

color, or often green from the presence of copper. 

ADAM8ITE. 0, U, Shepard, 1857, Geol. Vt., i, 484. after Prof. 
O. B. Adams, a State geologist of Vermont. An obs. name for muscovite. 

ADBUTB. H. I^ren, 1891, Geol. F6r. F6rh.. xiii. 781 (Adelit), f. 
aSrfXoi, 'obscure,' in allusion to its lack of transparency. Arsenate of 
calcium and magnesium, found in gray masses. 

ADBLPHOUTB. N. Nordemkiold, 1852. Nord. Verz., 87 (Adel- 
folit), f. adeXipoi, 'a brother.' and Az19o?, alluding to its close relationship 
to tantalite. A columbate of iron and manganese, found in brown 
crystals with a greasy lustre. 

ADINOIiB. F. 8. Beudant, 1882, Beud. Min., ii, 126. probably f. 
dSivoi, 'compact.' A compact var. of albite, called earlier, compact 
feldspar. 

ADIPOOBRITB. T, A, Beadwin, 1877, Min. Mag., i, 84. f. the 
older name, mineral adipocere. A syn. of hatchcttite. 

ADULARIA. E, Pint, 1783. Pini St. Gott.. 57 (adulaire), f. the 
Adula Mts., erroneously supposed to be the range containing Mt. St. 
Gotthard, its locality. The transparent var. of orthoclase, often show- 
ing pearly and opalescent reflections. 

2IOHTNITE. Error for seschynite. 

.SIDBLFORSITB. See edelforsite. 

Variant of edelite. 
Variant of sedelite. 

fOIRINB. See aegirite. 

JBOIRITB. J, Etmark, 1835, Berz. Jahres., xiv. 184 (^girin), after 
^gir, a Scandinavian god of the sea. A greenish- black silicate, closely 
related to p^iv>Aene. 

JENIOAfATITB. A. Breithaupt, 1865. Berg. Htlt.. xxiv, 898 (Ainig- 
matit). f. airtyua, * a riddle,' alluding to its problematical nature. Near 
koBlbingite. and probably the result of its alteration. 

ABRINITB. A, «. Lasaulx, 1876, Jahrb. Min., 852 (Aerinit), f. 
aefnro^, 'sky-blue,' alluding to its color. A doubtful hydrous silicate 



ABROSXTB 4 AaUILARITB 

of iron, aluminum, and calcium, found In dark blue masses. Probably a. 
mixture. 

ABROSFTB. C. J. 8elb [1805, Tab. Qes., 1, 811J, 1817, Tasch. Min., 
zi, 401 (Aerosit), prob. f. dt/p, depo%, 'gloom/ or 'darkness/ alluding to- 
lls dark color. An obs. syn. of pyrargynte. 

ABRUOITB. Adorn, 1869, Adam Tab., 48. f. aerugo, 'copper 

rust/ probably alluding to its appearance. A doubtful arsenate of nickel. 

iESOHTNTTB. J. J. Berulius, 1828, Berz. Jahres., ix, 195 (iBschy- 
nit), f. aiaxt}t^ff, 'shame,' alluding to the fact that chemistry had no 
means for separating titanic acid and zirconia. A columbo-titanate of 
uncertain composition, occurring in black resinous crystals. 

ABTHERIASTITB. Error for atheriastite. 

AFTONTTII. See aphthonite. 

AaALMATOLTTE. M. K Klaproih, 1797, Klap. Beit, ii, 184 
(Agal ma toll thus), f. ayaXfia, 'a statue,' and XiBo%, A var. of pinite often 
carved into images. Sometimes also talc and other soft minerals. 

AaAPHITE. O. FiscJier von Waldheim [1806, Soc. Nat. Mosc. Mem., 
i, 149], 1816, Fisch. Turq., 28, after Dimitri Agaphi, who had already 
described it. An obs. name for turquoise, the var. then called con- 
choidal turquoise. 

AQAPITE. Variant of agaphite. 

AGARIO AIINERAIj. From agaricum, 'fungus.' An old name 
for a very soft variety of calcitc, also called rock milk. 

AGATE. From achates. A well known var. of chalcedony 
occurring in various colors, irregularly clouded or blended. 

AGATE JASPER. Jasper banded with chalcedony. 

AGLAITE. A. A, Julien, 1877. E. M. Jour., xxiii, 217, f. dyXaoS, 
'shining.' A var. of the so-called cymatolite from Gk)shen, Ct., having 
a silvery micaceous lustre. 

AGNE8ITE. H. J. Brooke and W. H. Miller, 1852, B. and M. Min., 
591, f. St. Agnes, Cornwall, its locality. A steatite-like mineral, at first 
erroneously considered carbonate of bismuth. 

AGOIilTE. Probably a contraction of agalmatolite. 

AGRAMITE. 8, Meunier, 1893, Meun. Fers Met., 68, f. Agram, 
Croatia, where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 

AGRIOOLTTE. A. Frenzel, 1873, Jahrb. Min., 791 (Agricolit), in 
honor of Georg Agricola. A silicate of bismutli separated from culytite 
on account of a difference of crystalline form. 

AGUILARITE. F. A. OentJi, 1891. A. J. S., 3d, xli, 401, after P. 
Aguilar, who discovered it. Sulpho-selenide of silver, found in iron- 
black crystals. 



AQ-nSTITB 5 ALASKAITB 

AQUSTITS. J. B. Trommidorf, 1800, Jour, der Phann., viii. 158. 
A name given to a kind of apatite from Saxony, in which an earth called 
Agusterde, f. ayevaroi, 'without taste/ was thought to have been 
found. 

AUUNITJU. E, J. Chapman, 1848, Chap. Min., 127, in honor of Dr. 
Arthur Aikin. Sulphide of lead, bismuth and copper found in long- 
acicular crystals of a dark gray color. 

AnOAFIBRITB. See hemafibrite. 

AIBKANTINE. JT. /. Chapman, 1848, Chap. Min., 140, f. aimant, 
' lodestone.' An obs. syn. of magnetite. 

AnOATOUTB. See hematolite. 

AINAUTB. A. B. Nordemki&ld, 1865, Nord. Fin. Min., 02, f. 
aina (Finnish), 'constant,' and XtBoi, alluding to its being refractory to- 
solvents. A var. of caasiterite containing tantalic acid. 

AINIOllfATmi. Variant of lenigmatite. 

ATTHAUTB. Adam, 1869. Adam IVtb., 78, f . at^dXoi, ' soot,' 

alluding to its appearance. A syn. of asbolite. 

AJXrrS. 1878, Bull. Soc. Min., i, 126 (name of author not given), 
f. AJka, Hungary, its locality. A fossil resin much resembling amber. 

AKBRITE. A. Leymerie, 1859, Ley. Min., ii, 116, f. Aker, Sweden, 
its locality. A pale blue var. of spinel. 

AKBRMANITE. J. K X. Yogi [1890, Arch. Math. Nat., xiii, 810], 
1892, Dana Min., 476, in honor of R. Akerman. A silicate of calcium 
and other bases, found only in certain slags, hence an artificial product. 

AKONTXTB. A. Br&ithaupt, 1S85. Jour. Pk. Ch., iv, 259 (Akonttt), 
f. aKoov, 'a Javelin,' in allusion to the shape of its crystals. A cobalt- 
iferous var. of mispickel. 

AIiABANBINE. See alabandite. 

ALABANDITB. F, 8, Beudant, 1882. Beud. Min., ii, 899, f. Ala- 
banda, Asia Minor, its supposed locality. Sulphide of manganese, 
occurring in iron-black crystals. 

Also an old name for a var. of garnet now called alabandine. 

AIiABABTBR. From dXocflaa'Tpoy, said to be the name of a town 
in Egypt, 77, Pliny Hist., Bk. 5. 61. Fine-grained white, or delicately 
tinted, gypsum or calcite. 

AJLABABTRm]. VcUmant de Bomare, 1762, Bomare Min., i, 185. 
f. alabaster, of which it is an obs. syn. 

AIiAOAMlTB. Error for atacamite. 

AIiAUTE. B, Bontoisin, 1806, Jour, de Phyj., xiii. 409. f. Ala. 
Piedmont, its localily. and XiBoS. A non-alumiuous var. of pyroxene. 

AI.A8KAITE. O. A, Koenig, 1881, Am. Phil. Soc., 472, f. the- 



JkLBERTTTB 6 ALL&MONTITII 

Alaska mine, Colorado, its locality. A sulphide of bismuth, containing 
.also lead, silver, and copper. 

AliBBRTITE. J, BM (according to Hind, 1865. Prelim. Kept. 
Oeol. N. B., 91), 1855, Dawson's Acadian Geol., 206. f. Albert Mine, New 
Brunswick, its locality. A bituminous mineral resembling asphaltum, 
first called Albert coal. 

ALBINE. A. O. Werner, 1817, Wem. Letz., 87 (Albin), f. albus, 
' white,* referring to its color. A var. of apophyllite, occurring in small 
white crystals. 

ATiBITB. J. O. Oahn and /. J. Benelius, 1815, Afh. i Fis., iv, 180 
(Albit), f. albus, 'white/ in allusion to its usual color. A soda feldspar, 
generally while in color, sometimes with a bluish opalescence. 

ALnXANDRITB. N, Nordemkiold, 1842. Min. Ges. St. Pet. Schrfft., 
i, 116 (Alexandrit), in honor of Alexander I. of Russia. An emerald- 
green var. of chrysoberyl, red by transmitted light. 

ALGADONmi. Error for algodonitc. 

AliGAIiAfATOIilTE. Error for agalmatolite. 

ALaERITE. T. 8. Hunt, 1849, A. J. S., 2d, viii, 103. after Francis 
Alger, who discovered it. An altered scapolite found in slender, square, 
yellow prisms. 

ALGODONITir. F. Field, 1859, Jour. Ch. Soc., x, 289, f. the 
Algodones mine. Chili, its locality. Arsenide of copper found in brill- 
iant grayish-white masses, which soon tarnish on exposure. 

AT.TPITB. E. F, Olocker, 1845, Jour. Pk. Cb.. xxxiv, 494 (Alipil), 
f. dXtm/i, 'not greasy.' Hydrous silicate of nickel and magnesium of 
an apple-green color, not unctuous. 

AUSONTTE. F. Field, 1859, A. J. S., 2d, xxvii, 387, in honor of 
R. E. Alison, who had helped develop the mineral wealth of Chili. A 
mixture of galenite and chulcocite, resulting from alteration. 

ATiTZTTE. Error for alipite. 

AliLACnTE. A. Sjogren, 1884. Geol. F5r. F5rh., vii, 109 (Allaktit), 
f. dXXiXKTeiv, *to change,' in allusion to its pleochroism. Arsenate of 
manganese found in small, tabular, greenish crystals. 

ALLAQITIS. a F. Jasche, 1819, Jour. Cb. Ph., xxiv. 112 (Allagit), 
prob. f. dXXdyrf, 'exchange,' because it alters easily. A var. of rhodo- 
nite, the result of an alteration by which it has taken up some carbon 
dioxide. 

AliliANrm. T, ThofMon, 1810, Roy. Soc. Ed. Trans., vi, 371, 
after Thomas Allan, who first noticed it. A mineral similar to epidote, 
but containing cerium. 

IMONTTTB. TT. ffaidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 557 (Alle- 



ALLEY STONE 7 ALMANDINE 

moDtit), f. AUemoDt, France, its locality. A native compound of 
arsenic and antimony found in lustrous masses. 

ALLEY STONE. H. W. Brutow, 1861, Brist., Gloss., 8, probably f. 
Halle, Prussia, one of its principal localities. A syn. of websterite. 

ALLOOHITE. T, A, Beadwin, 1867, Head. Ind., p. i. Probably an 
error for allochroite, which at one time was considered a mixture of gurnet 
and epidote. A syn. of epidote. 

ALLOOHROITE. B. J. cCAndrada, 1800, Jour, de Phys., li, 243, f. 
aXXo^y and XP^^^f * another color,' in allusion to its variety of colors. A 
sub'Var. of iron4ime-gamet, called andradite by J. D. Dana. 

ALLOOLASE. See alloclasite. 

ALLOOLASITE. G. Tsehermak, 1866. K. Ak. Wien, lUi, (1), 220 
(AUoklas), f. aAA.o5, 'another,* and KXay, 'to cleave,* because it is differ- 
ent in cleavage from minerals which it otherwise resembles. Sulph- 
arsenide of bismuth and cobalt. 

ALLOGONITE. A. Breiihaupt, 1830, Breit. Uib., 23 (Allogonit), 
f. aXXoi, and yovia, 'another angle,' because differing in its angles from 
apatite. An obs. syn. of herderite. 

ALLOMORPHITE. A, BreWiaupt, 1838, Jour. Pk. Ch., xv, 322 
(Allomorphit), f. aXXo?, and uop<ptf, * another form,' because dimorphous 
with barite. A var. of barite having the form of anhydrite. 

ALLOPALLADIUM. /. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min.. 12, f. aXXo^, 
'another,' and palladium. The metal palladium found in hexagonal 
crystals instead of its usual isometric forms. 

ALLOPHANE. F, Sirameyer, 1816. G5tt. Ges. Anz., 1250 (Allo- 
phan), f. SXXoi, 'another,' and (paivecrOat, 'to appear,' because it 
changes before the blowpipe. Hydrous silicate of aluminum, usually 
found in amorphous crusts. 

ALLOPHANITE. Variant of allophane. 

ALLOPHITE. M. Websky, 1873, Zt. Geol., xxv, 399 (Allophit), f. 
&\Xoi, 'another,' and ophite, 'serpentine,' because very similar to serpen- 
tine. A soft greenish silicate of aluminum and magnesium. 

ALLUAUOITE. J, J. Bernhardi [1827, WOrterbuch der Natur- 
geschichte, iv, 572], 1828, Hart. HandwOrt., 572, after P. Alluaud, who 
discovered it. An obs. syn. of dufrenite. 

Also used by A, Damour, 1847, C. R., xxv, 670, for an altered triplite. 

ALMAORERITE. J, D. Dana, 1854, Dana Min., 371, f. the 
Almagrera Mts., Spain, its locality. An obs. syn. of zinkosite. 

ALMANDINE. Said to be derived from Alabanda, Asia Minor. 
An early name for certain gems; at first for violet-colored spinel, and 
later for precious garnet. 



AIiMANDITB 8 AMARANTITB 

ALMANIjaTJB. See almaDdine (garnet). 

ALSHEDrm. C, W. Blomstrand, 1878, Blom. Titan.. 7 (Alshedlt). 
f. Alsheda, Sweden, its locality. A vur. of titanite, occurring in small 
brown or gray crystals. 

ALSTONTTB. A. Breithaupt, 1841. Breit. Handb., ii, 255 (Alstonit). 
f. Alston Moor, England, its locality. A syn. of bromlite. 

ALTATTB. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 556 (Altait), f. the 
Altai Mts., Asia, its locality. Telluride of lead, generally occurring in 
metallic tin-white masses. 

ALUM. The name of a group including various native alums. 

ALUMIAN. A. Breitfiaupi, 1858, Berg. Hat., xvii, 53. f. alumina. 
Considered an aluminum sulphate, and found in southern Spain in micro- 
scopic white crystals. 

ALUMINIIilTE. /. C. Delametherie, 1797, Delam. T. T., ii. 113, f. 
alumine and Xffio<^. An obs. syn. of alunite. 

ALUMINITE. 2>. L. O. Karsten, 1808, Karst. Tab., 48 (Aluminit), 
f. alumen, *alum.' Hydrous aluminum sulphate, occurring in white 
reniform nodules. The curlier use of this name refers to a slate or shale. 

ALUMOCALOITE. A. BreitJimipt, 1832. Breit. Char.. 97 (Alumo- 
calcil). f. alumina and calcium, because it contains both. A var. of 
opal with alumina aiid lime as impurities. 

ALUM STONE. J. O. Wallerius, 1747, Wall. Min., 163 (Alunsten). 
so called because alum is made from it. A syn. of nlunite. 

ALUNITB. F. 8. Beudant, 1824. Bend. Min., 449, f. alun. 'alum.' 
Native sulphate of aluminum and potassium used in the manufacture of 
alum. 

ALUNOaEN. F. 8. Bevdant, 1832, Bend. Min.. ii, 488 (Alunogdne), 
f. alun and yevvdv, *to make alum.* Hydrous sulphate of aluminum, 
occurring in silky, white, or yellowish fibres. 

ALUNOGENITE. Variant of alunogen. 

ALURaiTE. A. Breiihaupt, 1865, Berg. Hat., xxiv, 336 (Alurgit). 
f. dXovpyoi, 'purple,' from its color. An obscure manganese mineral 
occurring in masses made up of minute purple scales. 

ALVITE. D. Forbes and T, DaJill, 1855, Mag. Nat., viii, 228 (Alvit), 
f. Alve, Norway, its locality. A silicate of glucinum and other bases 
found in crystals resembling zircon. 

AMALGAM. The native compound of silver and mercury. 

AMANBITB. \ 

AMANTICB. V Errors for amausite. 

AMANTITE. ) 

AMARANTITB. A. Frenzel, 1888, Min. Mitth., ix, 387 (Amarantit), 



AMAUSmi 9 ABSIANTHINITS 

f. dfidpavToi, 'amaranth/ on account of its color. A hydrous sul- 
phate of Iron, found in minute orange-red cr3r8tals. 

AMAUSITB. a A, Gerhard, 1814-15, Ak. Ber. Abh.. 12 (Amausit), 
f. amause, ' enamel/ because it fuses to an enamel-like mass. A com- 
pact feldspar made up mostly of oligoclase. Amause is probably a cor- 
ruption of emaux, as it is found only in technological dictionaries. 

AMAZONITE. Variant of amazon stone. 

AMAZON STONB. From its locality, the Amai^on River. Pierre 
des Amazones, of A, J. (TArgenvills, 1755, d'Arg. Oryct., 186, may be this 
mineral. Traits des Pierre, by N. Venette, 1701, 151, is there cited. The 
name probably goes further back. A bright-green feldspar now classed 
under microclin. 

AMBER. The common name of the well-known fossil resin, called 
succinite by mineralogists. 

AAIBBRTTB. Error for ambrite. 

AMBLYOONITE. A. Breithaupi, 1817. Hoff. Min., iv, (2), 159 
(Amblygonit), f. dfi/SXvyoDvioS, 'obtuse angle/ in alhision to its obtuse 
cleavage angle, earlier mistaken for a right angle. A tiuo-phosphate of 
aluminum and lithium. 

AMBLYSTBaiTE. O. vom Bath, 1869. Pogg. Ann., exxxviii. 531. 
(Amblystegit). f. djupXvi, 'blunt,' and areyi}, 'roof,' in allusion to the 
obtuse angles of its crystals. A syn. of pyroxene. 

AMBRITE. F. v. Hochstett&r, 1861, Geol. Reich. Abh., 4 (Ambrit). 
f. its resemblance to amber. A fossil resin from New Zealand, much 
used in the manufacture of varnish. 

AMBROSINE. C. U. SJiepard, 1870, Rural Car., i, 311. 1872, f. 
amber and rosin, because it resembles both. A yellowish or brown 
resinous substance found in rounded masses in certain phosphate beds. 

ABCE8INE. See amesite. 

AME8ITB. a U. Shepard, 1876, Shep. Cat. Min., 4 (Amesine), 
after James Ames, proprietor of the Chester emery mines. A chloritic 
mineral very near corundophilite. 

AMETHYST. From d^dBvaroi, 'not drunken,' because it was 
considered a preventive of intoxication. Purple or violet quartz often 
used as a gem. 

AMETHYSTOUNE. R P. Qreg and W. O. Lettsam, 1858, Q. 
and L. Min., 471, modelled after J. D. Dana's earlier name for a similar 
substance, brewstoline. A fluid of undetermined composition existing 
in cavities in amethyst. 

A2AIANTHINITE. R. Kirwan, 1794. Kirw. Min., i, 164, f. amian- 
thiiB, which it resembles. An obs. syn. of aclinolite. 



AMIANTHOIDII 10 ANAZiOITS 

AMIANTHOIDE. J, C. Delametherie, 1795, Delam. T. T., iii, 465, 
f. amianthus, of which it is a somewhat elastic Yariety. 

AMIANTHUS. From djaio^vro?, 'undefiled/ because not injured 
by fire. The finer and white kinds of asbestos, furnishing fibres that 
can be woven. 

AMIATITII. O. Sanih [1802, Santi Voy.], 1807. Brongn. Min., i, 
274, f. Mt. Amiato, Tuscany, its locality. An obs. syn. of hyalite. 

AMMIOIilTZI. J. D, Dana, 1850, Dana Min., 534, f. auuior, 
'vermilion,' in allusion to its color. A doubtful antimonate of copper, 
found as a red earthy powder. 

AMMONIA ALUM. See tschermigite. 

AMOIBITE. F. V. Kobell, 1844, Jour. Pk. Ch., zxziii. 402 (Amoibit), 
f. duoi/3?}, 'an exchange,' alluding to the fact that it contains nickel in- 
stead of cobalt. A var. of gersdorfflte. 

AMPHIBOLR H. J. Haiiy, 1797, Jour, des M., v, 267, f. dpLtpifioXoi, 
'ambiguous,' because so easily mistaken for other minerals. A group 
of silicates, including tremolitc, hornblende, actinolite, and others. 

AMPHIBOLITZI. Variant of ainphibole. 

AMPHIBOLB-ANTHOPHYLLITE. J. F, Williams, 1885, Am. 
Nat, xix, 884. A mineral with bronzy lustre crystallizing like amphi- 
bole, but with the composition of anthopbyllite. 

AMPHiaCNE. R. J, Haily, 1801, HaQy Min., ii, 403, f. dn<pi, 
'both,* and yevyav, 'to make,' because it was thought to have cleavages 
parallel to two forms. An obs. syn. of leucite. 

AMPHILOaiTE. C. E. SchafMutl, 1843, Ann. Ch. Pharm.. xlvi, 
330 (Amphilogit), f. du<piXoyo<i, 'questionable,' because of the doubt 
whether carbon dioxide is one of its essential constituents. A syn. of 
didymite. 

AMPHTTHALITE. L. /. IgeUtrom, 1866. Berg. IlOt., xxv, 809 
(Amfithalit), f. d/i0iBa\Xii^, 'abounding,' because of the abundance of 
beautiful minerals found with it. A hydrous phosphate of aluminum 
and calcium of a milk-white color. 

AMPHODELITE. N. NorcUnskiold, 1832, Pogg. Ann., xxvi, 488 
(Amphodelit), f. aV^/. 'both,' and oSeXui (for o/SeXo^), 'a spit/ because 
it occurs in twin crystals. A reddish var. of anorthite. 

ANAOBNITB. 1845, Haid. Handb., 576 (Anagenit), f. drareyyav, 
'to regenerate,' or 'make over,' perhaps because a conglomerate. A 
syn. of chrome ochre. This reference is the earliest found, but the name 
is probably older. 

ANALOIME. See analcite. 

ANALOITZI. B, J, HdUy, 1797, Jour, des M., ▼, 278 (Analcime). f. 



11 ANOLE8ITB 

araXiCii, 'weak/ in aUudon to its weak electrical power. Hydrous 
silicate of aluminum and sodium, occurring usually in white trapezohedral 
crystals. 

ANATA8B. R J. Hatly, 1801, Hatty Min., ill, 91, f. draraaii, 
'extension,' because its common octahedron is longer than that of certain 
other minerals. A syn. of octahedrite. 

ANAUXITB. A, Breiihaupt, 1888, Jour. Pk. Ch., xv, 825 (Anauxlt), 
f. dvav^?}?, 'not increasing,' because the mineral does not swell up before 
the blowpipe. A pearly-white granular mineral near cimolito. 

ANDALUSmi. J. a Delamelherie, 1798, Jour, de Phys., xlvi, 886 
(Andalousite), f. Andalusia, Spain, its locality. A very hard silicate of 
aluminum, occurring in orthorhombic prisms. 

ANDBRBBRaiTB. C. W. Blonuirand, 1886, Yet. Ak. Stock. 
Bih., xii, pt. 3 (10), 5 (Anderbergit), in honor of C. W. Anderberg. A 
peeudomorphous mineral belonging with cyrtolite. 

ANDBSINB. See andcsite. 

ANDBBITE. W. H. Abich, 1841, Berz. Jahres., xxi. 167 (Andesin), 
f. the Andes Mts., its locality. A triclinic lime-soda feldspar, generally 
found as a rock ingredient. 

ANDORTTB. J, A, Krenner [1892-8, Mathene es term. tud. firteslto 
xi. 119], 1894, Zt. Krjrst.. xxiii. 497 (Andorit), in honor of Andor von 
Semsey. Sulph-antimonide of lead and silver of dark blue to black 
color. 

ANDRADITB. J. D, Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 268, after J. B. 
d'Andrada. who first examined it. A name for a var. of garnet under 
which several sub varieties have been grouped. 

ANDRBASBBROOUTB. J. C. DelametherU, 1792, Delam. Sciag., 
i, 367, f. Andreasberg, Saxony, its locality, and A.^o?. An obs. syn. of 
harmotome. 

ANDRBOUTB. J, C, Delametherie, 1795, Delam. T. T., iii, 468. 
A contraction of andreasbergolite. 

ANDRBW8ITB. N. 8, Mdskelyne, 1871, Chem. News, xxiv, 99, in 
honor of Dr. Thomas Andrews of Belfast. A hydrous phosphate of 
iron and copper, occurring in hemispheres like wavellite. 

ANOIiARTTB. F. v, Kobell, 1881, Kob. Char., ii, 287 (Anglarit), f. 
Anglar, France, its locality. A massive var. of vivianite. 

Also used by N. Nordenskidld, 1849, Nord. Atom Ch. Min. Syst., 86 
(Anglarit), as the name for one of P. Berthier's varieties of berthierite. 

ANGLBSTTB. F, 8. Beudani, 1882, Beud. Min., ii, 459, f. Anglesea, 
England, its locality. Sulphate of lead occurring generally in brilliant 
colorless crystals. 



ANHTDBTTS 12 ANTHCX^RABCMITH 

ANHTDBTTS. A.O. Wmfier, 1804, Ludw. Min., ii, 212 (Anhydrit), 
f. ay-v6poi, ' without water/ Anhydrous sulphate of calcium, occur- 
riug in colorless or slightly tinged crystals, or masses. 

ANHTDRO-FBRRITE. E, J. Chapman, 1848, Chap. Min., 84, f. 
av'vSpoi, and ferrum. An obs. syn. of hematite. 

ANDHIBITII. ff. Wurig, 1879, E. M. Jour., xxvii, 124, f. animikie 
(Chippewa), 'thunder,' because found near Thunder Bay, Lake Superior. 
A somewhat doubtful silver antimonide. 

ANKERITB. W, ffakUnger, 1825, Haid. Mohs., i, 411 (Ankerit), in 
honor of Prof. M. J. Anker. Carbonate of calcium, magnesium, and 
iron, found in white, gray, or brown crystals, and massive. 

ANNABBRaim. ff, J. Brooke and W. H. MUler, 1852, B. and 
M. Min., 508, f. its locality, Annaberg, Saxony. Hydrous arsenate of 
nickel, found as an apple-green coating on other nickel minerals. 

ANNBRODITE. W. C, Brogger, 1881, Geol. F6r. FOrh., v, 854 
(AnnerSdit). f. AnnerOd, Norway, its locality. A columbite of uranium, 
near samarskite in composition but different in form. 

ANNTTE. J. D, Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 808, f. Cape Ann, its 
locality. A var. of lepidomelane. 

ANNIVITE. R. Brauns [1854, Nat. Ges. Bern., No. 317, 57], 1856, 
Kenng. Ueb. for 1855, 120 (Annivit), f . the Annivier Valley, Switzerland, 
its locality. A var. of tetrahedrite containing bismuth. 

ANOMAIJTIS. O. A. Koenig, 1879, L. Hour, Hi, (2),l,f. anomalous, 
because though containing manganese it does not give its characteristic 
reactions. A pseudomorphous mineral resulting from the alteration of 
jeifersonite. 

ANOMrm. O, Tsehermak, 1877, Zt. Kryst., ii, 31 (Anomit), f. 
avoueiv, * to act contrary to law,* because of its optical difference from 
biotite. One of the two species into which biotite has been divided on 
optical grounds. 

ANORTHTTE. Q, Rose, 1823, Ann. de Phys., Ixxiii, 197, f. dr 
privative, and opGo?, 'upright,' alluding to its oblique crystals. A 
triclinic feldspar, usually found in colorless crystals. 

ANORTHOOI^ASE. H. Bosenbuseh, 1886, Rosen. Mik. Phys., 650. 
A triclinic, soda-potash feldspar, resembling orthoclase. 

ANTHOOHROrrE. L. J. IgeUtrdm, 1889, Jahrb. Min., ii. 86 
(Anthochroit), f. avOo?, 'flower,' and xP^M<x, 'color,' alluding not only 
to the beautiful color of the mineral, but also to that of the mixture of 
which it is a part. A member of the pyroxene group, probably identical 
with violan. 

ANTHOQRAMMITE. A. Breiihaupt, 1820, Breit. Char., 29, 



AMTHOIilTB 13 ANTZLIimEl 

<Anihogrammit), probably contracted from anthophyllite and yfiafifirf, * a 
line/ because of its fibrous structure. An obs. syn. of anthophyl- 
lite. 

ANTHOUTB. A, Breithaupi, 1880, Breit. Uib., 88 (Antholith), 
probably a contraction of anthophyllite, of which it is a synonym. 

ANTHOPHTLUNXI. Variant of anthophyllite. 

ANTHOPHTLUTB. C. F. Schumacher, 1801, Schum. Min., 96 
(Anthophyllit), f. anthophyllum, 'a cloye/ in allusion to its usual cloye- 
brown color. A fibrous silicate of magnesium and iron, often having a 
submetallic lustre. 

ANTHOSIDXIRm]. /. F. L, Rausmann, 1841, GOtt. Ges. Anz., 
1881 (Anthosiderit), f. ayBo<;, 'a flower,' and criS-rfpoi, 'iron,' because it is 
an iron mineral occurring in flower-like tufts. A hydrous silicate of iron, 
found in yellowish tufts. 

ANTHRAOrm. R. J. Rauy, 1797, Jour, des M., v, 888, f. 
avBpa^, 'dKoi, 'coal.' A hard yar. of mineral coal, containing little 
volatile matter. 

ANTHRAOOUTXI. /. v. Born, 1790. Born Cat. Foss.. ii, 296, f. 
dvBpa^, 'dKoi, 'coal,' and AzOoS. An obs. syn. of anthracite. 

Also a yariant of anthraconite. 

ANTHRAOONTTXI. G, E. F. v. Moll, 1806, Moll Jahrb. Efem. , ii. 
805 (Anthrakonit), f. avSpa^, -a/co?, * coal,' and Kovia, 'lime,' because it is 
a limestone containing carbon. A black yar. of marble which sometimes 
€mits a fetid odor when struck. 

ANTHRAOOXSNE. See anthracoxenite. 

ANTHRAOOXSNTTB. F. A. Beuss, 1856. K. Ak. Wien., xxi, 271 
{Anthracoxene), f. avBpaz, -a/co?, 'coal,' and ^^vo?, *a guest,* because 
found in coal. Anthracoxen is a brownish resin found in the coal- 
beds of Brandeisl, Bohemia. It is partly soluble in ether; the insoluble 
black powder has been called anthracoxenite by /. D. Dana, 1868, Dana 
Min. , 746. 

ANTHRAXOUTE. E. J, Chapman, 1871. Minerals and Geol. of 
Central Canada, 145, f. ayBpaq, 'coal,' and AzOoS, from its appearance. 
A coal-like substance of variable composition. 

ANTIBDRm]. A. Breithaupt, 1882, Breit. Char., 164 (AntiGdrit). 
contracted from antihemiedrite, in allusion to its crystalline form. An 
obs. syn. of edingtouite. 

ANnGK>RITB. E. Schweizer, 1840, Pogg. Ann., xlix, 595 (Anti- 
gorit). f. the Antigorio Valley, Piedmont, its locality. A lamellar var. 
of serpentine. 

ANTIXiLITB. a U. Shepard, 1872, Shep. Cat. Met., 6, f. the 



ANTIMONIAZ« AR8BNTO 14 ANTIMONT OOHBB 

Antilles, its locality. A supposed hydrated bronzite, near deweylite ii» 
composition. 

ANTIMONIAZ« ARSENIC. C. F. Rammelaherg, 18(K), Ramm. Min. 
Cb., 984 (Antimon-arsenik). Native arsenic containing a little antimony. 

ANTIMONIAL COPPER. /. D. Dana, 1837, Dana Min., 415^ f. 
its composition. A syn. of cbalco^tibite. 

ANTIMONIAL COPPER QLANCB. A. Breithaupi, 1882, Breit. 
Obar., 270 (Antimonkupfer-Glanz), f. its composition. A syn. of 
bouruonite. 

ANTIMONIAL LEAD ORB. R. Jameson, 1816, Jam. Min., iii, 
872, f . its composition. A syn. of bournonite. 

ANTIMONIAL NICKEL. F. Stromeyer and J. F. L, Edusmann, 
1833, GOtt Ges. Anz., 2001 (An timon- nickel), alluding to its composition. 
A syn. of both breithauptite and ullmannite. 

ANTIMONIAL OCHRE. B. Kirwan, 1796. Eirw. Min., ii, 252, f. 
its com position. A syn. of cervantite. 

ANTIMONIAL RED SILVER. /. L. Prauat, 1804, Jour, de Phys., 
lix, 407 (Argent rouge antimoniale), f. its composition and color. An 
obs. syn. of pyrargyrite. 

ANTIMONIAL SILVER. B. J. Hauy, 1801, HaOy Min.. iii, 276 
(Argent antimoniale), f. its composition. A syn. of dyscrasite. 

ANTIMONIAL SILVER BLENDE. A, BreOfiaupt, 1830, Breit. 
Uib., 79 (Antimonsilbcrblende), f. its composition. An obs. syn. of 
pyrargyrite. 

ANTIMONTTB. W. Eaidinger, 1845. Haid. Handb., 568 (Anti- 
monit), f. Antimon, 'antimony.' A syn. of stibnite. 

ANTIMONOPHYLLTTE. A. Breiiliaupt, 1823, Breit. Char., 2S 
(Antimon-Pbyllit), f. Antimon. 'antimony,' and 0t'AAoK, *a leaf.' because 
it is a foliated antimony mineral. A mineral not now identified, but 
probably valentlnite. 

ANTIMONY. Natural metallic antimony, usually called native 
antimony. 

ANTIMONY BLENDE. B. Jameson, 1820, Jam. Min., iii, 421, f. 
its composition. An obs. syn. of kermesite. 

ANTIMONY BLOOM. K. C. v, Leonhard, 1821, Leon. Orykt., 160 
(AntimonblQthe), 'flowers of antimony.' An obs. syn. of valentlnite 
which is often found as an efilorescence. 

ANTIMONY QLANCB. B, Jameson, 1820, Jam. Min., iii, 390. 
A syn. of stibnite. 

ANTIMONY OCHRE. B, Jameson, 1820, Jam. Min., ii, 431. A 
syn. of cervantite, later used for other oxides of antimony. 



15 

AMIXBIOTB. W. F, EilUbrand, 1889, Geol, Surv. U. 8. Bull., 
No. 55, 55, f. the Antler mine, Arizona, its locality. Basic sulphate of 
copper, of a light green color. 

ANTOZONTTB. a F. Sehdnbein, 1861, Jour. Pk. Ch., Ixxxiii, 95 
(Antozonit), f. antozone, which it was thought to contain. A supposed 
vur. of fluorite. 

ANTKAXONITU. Error for anthrakonite. 

ANTRIMOIJTB. T. Thomson [1881, Bryce Tab.], 1838, Phil. Mag., 
3(1, iii. 85, f. Antrim, Ireland, its locality, and XBo^. A var. of meso- 
iite. occurring in stalactites. 

APATBUTB. A. Meittet, 1842. Key. Scient., xi. 255, f. dndrTfXoi, 
* deceiving,' because it resembles xanthosiderite, but differs from it in com- 
position. A hydrous ferric sulphate, found in yellow nodules in clay. 

APATTTB. A. O. Werner, 1786, Gerh. Grund., 281 (Apatit), f. 
dinar dv, 'to deceive,' because it had been mistaken for several different 
minerals. Phosphate of calcium, occurring in hexagonal prisms, or 
massive, of various colors but most often green. 

APATOED. a U, Shepard, 1846, A. J. S., 2d, ii, 379, so named 
from its resemblance to apatite. A doubtful meteoric mineral, occurring 
in small yellow, semi-transparent grains. The name was soon dropped by 
the author. 

APHANB8ITB. F, S. BeudanU 1882, Beud. Min.. ii, 602 (apha- 
ndse), f. d<pav7)<i, 'obscure.' because its crystals are hard to see. A 
syn. of cHnoclasite. 

APHBRB8B. F. 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 569 (apherese), 
f. d<paipecrii, 'a taking away,' because separated from another species. 
An obs. syn. of libethenite. 

APHRTTB. 2>. L. O, Karsten, 1808, Karst. Tab., 50 (Aphrit), f. 
dtppo^, * foam,' alluding to its appearance, A very soft var. of calcite. 

Also used erroneously for apyrite. 

APHRIZTTB. B. J, (TAndrada, 1800, Jour, de Phys., 11, 248, f. 
dippiZeiv, 'to foam,' because it intumesces before the blowpipe. A 
black var. of tourmaline. 

APHROOHALOITB. E. F. Gloeker, 1847. Glock. Syn., 220 (Aphro- 
chalcit). f. d(Pp6%, 'foam,* and x^^*^<^^* 'copper,' from its earlier name, 
kupferschaum. An obs. syn. of tyrolite. 

APHRODITB. IT. J. Berlin, 1840, Vet. Ak. Stock., 172 (Aphrodit), 
f. dtppdi, 'foam,' alluding to its appearance. A hydrous silicate of 
magnesium, in appearance much like meerschaum. 

APHROSIDBRITB. F. 9. Sandberger, 1847, Sand. Ueb., 97 (Aphro- 
siderit), f. d0p6i, 'foam,' and (ridrjpo^, 'iron,' from its appearance and 



16 ARAOONITZr 

composition. A chlorite-like mineral of scaly structure and olive-green 
color, near penninite in composition. 

AFHTHAIiOSS. F. 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 477. f. 
ciipBiToi, 'unalterable/ and aAs, dXoi, 'a salt/ because unchanged 
when exi)osed to air. The earlier form of aphthitalite. 

AFHTHrrAUTB. C. U, Shepard, 1885, Shep. Min.. i, 86, f. (see 
aphthalose). Potassium sulphate, occurring in delicate white crystals in 
lava. 

APHTHONTTB. L, F. Seanberg, 1848. Berz. Jahres., xxvii. 286 
(Aftonit), f. a<pOoyoi, 'abundant/ because so rich in silver. A sulph- 
antimonidc of copper and other metals, probably a var. of tetrahedrite. 

AFJOHNTTS. E. F. Oloeker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 2W (Apjohnit), 
after Dr. J. Apjohn, who first examined it. A manganese alum, found 
in silky, white, fibrous masses. 

Also used by B. P. Oreg and W. O, Lettiom, 1858, G. and L. Min., 
489, for a mixture of pyrite, galenite, and sphalerite. 

APLOMB. B, J, Hauy, 1801, HaUy Min., iv, 289, f. dnXooi, 
'simple,' because it was considered a fundamental form. A subvar. of 
garnet. 

APOPHTLLITB. i?. J. Hauy, 1806. Lucas Tab., i, 266, f. and, and 
{pvXXd^etr, ' to get leaves,' because it exfoliates when heated. Hydrous 
silicate of calcium and potassium, occurring generally in colorless crystals 
with a vitreous or pearly lustre. 

APOTOMB. The name of one of B, J. Uauy's vars. of celestite^ 
based on crystallographic form, and sometimes used as a syn. of celestlte. 

APYRB. For feldspar apyre. 

APTRTTB. J, F. L. Hausmann, 1813, Haus. Min., 642 (Apyrlt), f. 
a, and nx^p, 'fire,* because not fusible. An obs. syn. of rubellite. 

AQUAORBPTTTB. G, U. Sliepard, 1868. A. J. S., 2d, xlvi, 256, f. 
aqua, 'water,' and crepitare, *to crackle/ because it emits a crackling 
sound when immersed in water. A clay-like mineral of yellowish 
color, near hydropite. 

AQUAMARINB. From aqua marina, 'sea water,' in allusion to its 
color. A bluish green var. of beryl, often used as a gem. 

ARffiOXBNB. F. v, Kobell, 1850. Jour. Pk. Ch., 1, 496 (Arseoxen), 
f. dpaioi, ' rare,' and ^^yoi, * a guest,' on account of its rarity. A syn. 
of dechenite. 

ARAOONTTB. A. G. Werner, 1796, Est. Min., ii, 1039 (Arragonit), 
f . Aragon, Spain, its locality. Carbonate of calcium, in pseudohexagonal 
crystals, which are complicated twins. 



ARAOOTITE 17 AROENTOPTRITXI 

ARAGOnriS. B. Durand, 1872, Acad. Cal., iv, 218, in honor of 
Arago, the astronomer. A volatile hydrocarbon near idrialite, occurring 
in yellowish scales. 

AROANITIS. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 492 (Arcanit), f. 
arcanum duplicatum, an alchemistic name of the salt. An obs. syn. of 
aphthitalite. 

AROTIOITB. A Q. Wemef, 1804, Ludw. Mhi., ii, 210 (Arktizit), 
f. apKTo%, the North,' because found in Arctic regions. An obs. syn. 
of wernerite 

ARCTOUTB. a W, Blomtirand, 1880, Geol. F6r. F6rh., v, 210 
(Arktolit), f. aptcroi, ' the North,' alluding to its place of occurrence, and 
AiOos. A hydrous silicate of aluminum, calcium, and magnesium, near 
prehnite, found in Arctic regions. 

ARDBNNITS. A. v. Lasaulx and A. Betiendorf, 1872, Nied. Ges. 
Boon, zzix, 192 (Ardennit), f. Ardennes, Belgium, its locality. A sili- 
cate of aluminum and manganese, containing varying amounts of arsenic 
and vanadium, found in imperfect yellowish crystals. 

AR£2NDAIJTIS. D. L. O. Earsten, 1800, Karst. Tab., 84 (Arenda- 
lit), f . Arendal, Norway, its locality. An obs. syn. of epidote. 

AR£2NDmS. Variant of arendalite. 

ARBQinPrm. a. Raimandi, 1878, Min. Perou, 167, f. the Prov. of 
Arequipa, Peru, its locality. A compact yellowish, wax-like mineral, 
said to be a silioo-antimonate of lead. 

ARFVBDSONITB. IT. /. Brooke, 1828, Ann. Phil., 2d, v, 881, in 
honor of Prof. J. A. Arf vedson. A silicate resembling hornblende, but 
containing much soda. 

ARFWEDSONTTB. Variant of arfvedsonite. 

ARQBNTINB. B. Kirtoan, 1794, Eirw. Min., i, 104, f. argentum, 
'silver,' in allusion to its lustre. A lamellar var. of calcite with a 
pearly-white lustre. 

ARaBNTTTB. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 565 (Argentit), 
f. argentum, 'silver.' Sulphide of silver, occurring in brilliant black 
crystals, and also massive, forming an important ore. 

AROBNTOBISMXTnTB. F, A. Oenth, 1885, Am. Phil. Soc, 85, 
f. argentum, 'silver,' and bismuth, referring to its composition. A 
sulphide of silver and bismuth, called earlier silberwismuthglanz. 

AROBNTOPYRITB. /. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 89, f. silber- 
kies, of W, 8. v, Walierahauaen, 1866, Jabrb. Min., 725, alluding to its 
composition.* A silver and iron sulphide, occurring in small, hexagonal 
prisms. 



18 

ARQTRITXI. B. F. Oloeker, 1847. Glock. SyiL, 28 (Argyrit). f. 
apyvpoi, * silver/ from its composition. A syn. of argentite. 

ARQTROOXIRATITB. Variant of cerargyrite. 

ARQTRODITE. A, Weubaeh, 1886, Jahrb. Min., ii, 67 (Argyrodit), 
f. dpyvp(odtfi, 'rich in silver/ from its composition. Sulphide of 
silver and germanium, found in small, steel-gray crystals of the moDOcUnic 
system. 

ARQTROPTRITXI. A. Weisbaeh, 1877, Jahrb. Min., 006 (Argyro- 
P3rrlt), f. dpyvpof;, 'silver,' and pyrite, from its composition. A var. 
of silberkies or argentopyrite. 

AROTROPYRRHOTINIS. C. W. Blonuirand, 1870, Yet. Ak. Stock. 
Oefv., xxvii, 26 (Argyropyrrhotin), f. apyvpoi, 'silver,* and pyrrohotine, 
because a silver mineral resembliug pyrrhotine. A syn. of stembergite. 

ARQTROSS. F, 8. Beudant, 1882, Beud. Min., ii, 892, f. apy^poi, 
* silver,* because of its composition. An obs. syn. of argentite. 

ARQTRYTHROSE. F 8. Beudant, 1882, Beud. Min., ii, 490, f. 
&pyvpo^, 'silver,' aud epvBpoi, 'red,' from its composition and color. 
An obs. syn. of pyrargyrlte. 

ARIOrriS. 1887, Phil. Mag., x, 170. Said to be from Arida, now 
La Riccia, Italy, its locality. Probably a popular name. An obs. syn. 
of gbmoudite. 

ARrrS. See aarite. 

ARKANSITE. C. U. 8hepard, 1846, A. J. S., 2d, ii, 250, f. Arkansas, 
its locality. A black var. of brookite from Magnet Cove, Ark. 

ARSSUDITB. Error for arksutite. 

ARSSUTTTXI. O. Hagemann, 1866, A. J. S., 2d, zUi, H f. Arksut- 
fiord, Greeuland, its locality. A syn. of chiolite. 

ARlklENIAN BTONB. An old name for azurite, alluding to a 
well-known locality. 

ARMENITS. J. C. Delametherie, 1797. Delam. T. T., ii, 186, f. 
Armenia, its locality. An obs. syn. of azurite. 

ARMINITB. Error for amimite. 

ARNIMTTXI. A, Weubaeh, 1886, Jahrb. Berg. Hat., 86 (Amimit), 
after the v. Arnim family, owners of the Planitz coal works. A hydrous 
sulphate of copper, found as a green coating consisting of microscopic 
scales. 

AROMITB. Z. Daraptky, 1890, Jahrb. Min., i, 49 (Aromit), f. the 
Pampa de Aroma, Chili, where it was found. Hydrous sulphate of 
magnesium, resembling epsomite. 

ARPmBUTB. Error for aspidelite. 

ARQUBRTTB. P. Berthier, 1842, C. R., xiv, 567, f. the mines of 



ABRAaONZTB 19 AR8EMIO 8INTBR 

Arqueros, Chili, its locality. Silver amalgam, coDtaining only a small 
proportion of mercury. 

ARRAQONTTXI. See aragonite. 

ARRAOON SPAR. R Kirwan, 1794, Eirw. Min., i, 87. A syn. 
•of aragonite. 

ARRHBNITB. A. K NardmiJddld, 1872, Nevill Cat., 126 (Arrhenit), 
in honor of Col. Carl A Arrheniixs, who first drew attention to the Ytterby 
minerals. An uncertain decomposition product, resembling red feld- 
spar; a hydrous silicate and tantalate of yttrium and other bases. The 
name first appeared on labels. 

ARSBNARaRNTITE. J. B. Hdnnay, 1877. Min. Mag., i, 152, f. 
its composition. A somewhat doubtful arsenide of silver, from an un- 
certain locality. 

AR8BNIO. From dpaeyiKov, ^orpiment.' The element as a 
mineral, usually called native arsenic. 

ARSBNIOAIi ANTIMONY. R, Allan, 1884, Allan Min., 299, f. 
its composition. An obs. syn. of allemontite. 

AR8ENIOAI. BISMUTH. A. O. Werner, 1817. Wem. Letz., 56 
<Arsenik Wismuth), f. its composition. The first name for eulytite, 
including agricolite and bismutospheerite. Later used for a var. of 
arsenic containing three per cent of bismuth. 

ARSBNIOAIi OOBALT. An early name for both cobaltite and 
smaltite. 

ARSBNIOAIi OOPPBR. J. K. L, Zineken, 1887, Pogg. Ann., xli, 
659 (Arsenikkupfer), f. its composition. A syn. of domeykite. 

ARSBNIOAIi IRON. R, J. Hauy, 1801, HaQy Min.. iv, 89 (fer 
Arsenical), f . its composition. An early name for ar8enop3rrite. 

ARSBNIOAIi MANQANBSE. A syn. of kaneite. 

ARSBNIOAIi NIOKBI.. R, J, Eauy, 1801, HaUy Min.. iii, 864 
^Nickel arsenical), f. its comi)osition. A syn. of niccolite. 

ARSBNIOAIi PTRITBS. An early name for arsenopyrite. 

ARSBNIOAIi SILVBR BLBNDB. A. Breiihaupt, 1882, Breit. 
Char., 288 (Arsensilberblende). An obs. syn. of proustite. 

ARSBNIO BLOOM. D. L. G, Karsien, 1800. Karst. Tab., 79 
(Arsenikbllithe). An obs. syn. both of arsenolite and pharmacolite. 

ARSBNIOITB. F. 8. Beudant, 1882, Beud. Min.. ii. 693, f. arsenic. 
An obs. syn. of pharmacolite, particularly of the variety called picro- 
pharmacolite. 

ARSBNIO SILVBR. Ji£. H. Klaproih, 1795, Klap. Beit., i, 183 
<Ar8eniksilber). A mixture of dyscrasite and arsenopyriee. 

ARSBNIO SINTBR R, Hermann, 1845, Soc. Nat. Mosc. Bull., 



ARSBNIOPLBrm 20 A8BBFBRRITB 

i. 254 (ArseDikslDter), f. its composition and appearance. A syn. of 
iron sinter, scorodite. 

AR8ISNIOPI.BITXI. X. J. IgeUtrom, 1888, Jahrb. Min., ii, 117 
(Arseniopleit), f. arsen, 'arsenic/ and nXeitov, 'more/ because other 
arsenates are found in the same place. A hydrous arsenate of manga- 
nese, lead and other bases, found in narrow, brown veins in dolomite. 

ARSENIOSIDXIRm!. A. Dtifrenoy, 1842, Ann. des M., 4th, ii^ 
848 (Arsenio-siderite), f. arsenic and aiSrfpo^, Mron.' A hydrous arse- 
nate of iron and calcium, occurring in golden-brown, fibrous concretions. 

ARSENmS. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 487 (Arsenit). f. 
arsenik. Native arsenioas acid. To avoid confusion this name has 
been changed to arsenolite. 

ARSENOOROOrrXI. E, F. Qloeker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 226(Ar8eno. 
krokit), f. arsenik and KpdtCTj, 'a fibre,' referring to its structure. A 
syn. of arseniosiderite. 

ARSENOIiAMPRITE. C7. nintaa, 1886. Zt. Eryst., zi, (K)6 (Arseno- 
lamprit), f. arsenik and Xafiitpd^t 'brilliant.* A var. of native arsenic 
with brilliant lustre. 

ARSENOIJTS. J. D. Dana, 1854, Dana Min., 189, f. arsenite, 
the earlier name of native arsenious acid, and A/Go?. Native arsenioua 
acid, found usually in white incrustations. 

ARSENOMEIuAN. W. 8. v. Waltershausen, 1855, Pogg. Ann., 
zciv, 115, f. arsenik and /leAdS, -dvoi, 'black/ f. its composition and 
color. A syn. of sartorite. 

ARSXINOPHYIiIilTS. Vuriaut of arseuphyllite. 

ARSSNOPYRITE. E. R Oloeker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 88, f. Arsenik- 
kies. Sulphide of arsenic and iron, called also arsenical pyrites and 
mispickel. 

ARSBNOSIDSRITXI. E. F. Oloeker, 1839, Glock. Min., 821 (Arse- 
nosiderit), f. arsenik and criSrjpo^, 'iron.' An obs. syn. of leucopyrite. 

ARSSNOTEIiXiURITS. J. B. Hannay, 1878, Jour. Ch. Soc, 2d, 
xi, 989, f. arsenic and tellurium. A doubtful sulph-arsenide of tellurium, 
found in small, brownish scales on arsenopyrite. 

ARSENFHYLIilTS. A. BretViaupU 1832. Breit. Char., 89, f. 
arsenik and (pvXXov, 'a leaf,' because of its composition and appearance. 
An obs. syn. of arsenolite. 

ARSSNSTTBITE. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 42, f. arsenic and 

stibium. A doubtful hydrous arsenate of antimony. 

ARVATTS. 8. Meunier, 1893, Meun. Fers Met., 28, f. Arva, 
Hungary, where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 

ASBEFBRRrm. L. J". IgeUtrdm, 1867, Berg. Hat., xxvi, 28, 



ASBBSTINITJJ 21 ABPIDBLTTXI 

(Asbeferrit), f. asbest and ferrum. A fibrous rar. of amphlbole, con- 
taining iron, near dannemorite. 

ASBBSTINITU. R Kirwan, 1794, Eirw. Mln., i, 165, f. asbestos. 
An obs. name for fibrous amphibole. 

ASBBBTITXI. Variant of asbestos. 

ASBBSTOXD. R. Kirwan, 1794, Eirw. Min., i, 166, f. its resem- 
blance to asbestos. An obs. name for actinolite. 

ASBESTOS. Pliny, 77, Pliny Hist., Bk. 87, 54. f. aafiearoi, 
' unquenchable.' A fine fibrous var. of amphibole. Also used as the 
trade name of chrysotil (serpentine-asbestos). 

A8BB8TU8. Variant of asbestos. 

ASBOIiAN. Seeasbolite. 

ASBOUTB. A. BreUhaupi, 1847, Breit. Handb., 882 (Asbolan), f. 
dafioXrf, * soot/ on account of its appearance. A yar. of wad containing 
cobalt, also called earthy cobalt. 

A80HIRITB. Error for achirite. 

ASH DRAWBR. An old name for tourmaline, from its electrical 
property of attracting light substances. 

ASBffANITE. N. 8, Maskelyne, 1872, Phil. Trans., clxi, 861, f. 
A'sman, 'the thunderbolt of Indra,' referring to its origin. Silica 
found in meteoric iron in supposed orthorhombic crystals, but later proved 
to be identical with tridymite. 

ASPARAOOUTB. D. do OaUiteen, 1801, Gall. Hec, 27, f. aspar- 
agus stone, of which it is an obs. syn. 

ASPARAQUS STONB. A. Q. Werner, 1794, Est. Min., ii, 1045 
(Spargelstein), alluding to its color. A yellowish-green var. of apatite. 

ASPASIOLTTB. Th. Scheerer, 1846, Pogg. Ann., Ixviii, 823 (Aspa- 
sioUth), f. dajecti^€<TOai, * to welcome,' and AzOo?, because it is found with 
iolite. A var. of fahlunite of greenish color clouded with red. 

ASPBROIJTB. R. Hermann, 1866, Soc. Nat. Mosc. Bull., xxzix, 
68, f. asper, 'rough,' and AzOo?, because very rough. A var. of chryso- 
colla, containing more than the usual percentage of water. 

ASFHAIiT. Variant of asphaltum. 

A8PHALTBNB. /. B. BaussingauU, 1886, Jour. Pk. Ch., ix, 282, 
f. asphaltum. The solid part of bitumen, as distinct from the liquid 
part; probably a mixture. 

ASPHALTUM. From a(r<paXroS, 'bitumen.' A pitch-black, 
solid hydrocarbon. 

ASPEDBUTB. P. C, Weibye, 1849, Jahrb. Min., 776, perhaps f. 
dcrniSifi, ' broad,' in allusion to the shape of its crystals. A var. of 
titanite, occurring in cavities in titanic iron. 



ASPEDOUTB 32 ATOPITB 

ASPIDOLITB. F. «. KobeU, 1889. E. Ak. MQDch., i. 864 (Aspido- 
lith), f. danti, -ido^, *a shield/ from the appeaniDce of its crystals, and 
XiBoi. A micaceous mineral of an olive-green color, near phlogopite. 

ABTBRIA. Pliny, 77, Pliny Hist.. Bk. 87, 181. An old name for 
the star sapphire. 

ABTSRmz. Variant of asteria. 

A8TSROITXI. L. J. IgeUtrom, 1870, Berg. Hat., xzix, 8 (Asteroit), 
f. afoTT/p, 'a star.' A grayish or white stellated var. of pyroxene from 
Sweden. 

ASTOOHTTB. H. Sjogren, 1891, Geol. F6r. Farh. . xiii, 604 (Astochit), 
f. acrroxo^, * missing the mark,' because at first considered a pyroxene. 
A bluish amphibole, found in aggiegations of short, columnar crystals. 

ASTRAOHANITB. Variant of astrakanite. 

ASTRAKANTTXI. O, Bote, 1842, Rose Reis., ii, 270 (Astrakanit), f. 
Astrakhan, its locality. A whitish var. of blcedite, found in crystals. 

ASTRITS. Variant of asteria. 

ASTROPHTLLTTXI. Tli, Scheerer, 1864, Berg. Hat., xiii, 240 
(Astrophyllit), f. acrrpov, 'brilliant,' and 0JAAof, 'a leaf,' alluding to 
its appearance and structure. A lustrous, bronze-yellow mica, contain- 
ing titauium. 

ATAOAMTTB. D, de Oailitsten, 1801, Gkill. Itec., 27, f. Atacama, 
Chili, its locality. Oxy-chloride of copper, occurring in bright green 
•crystals, and as sand; formerly called "Green sand of Peru." 

ATELBSTITB. A, Breithaupt, 1882, Breit. Char., 807 (Atelestit), f. 
areAi;^, ' imperfect,' on account of its lack of regular form. A bismuth 
arsenate, found in small, sulphur-yellow, monoclinic crystals. 

ATBUTE. A. Scaeehi, 1873, Nap. Ac. Atti, vi, 22 (Atelina), f. 
dreXt/i, * incomplete,' because it continues to alter even after being placed 
in the museum. A green chloride of copper, near atacamite, resulting 
from the alteration of tenorite. 

ATHBRIABTTTB. P. C. Weibye and N, J, Berlin, 1850, Pogg. 
Ann., Ixxix, 302 (Atheriastit), f. dOepiaaro^, error for dbipiaro^, 'not 
observed,' because long mistaken for scapolite. An altei-ed scapolite of 
greenish color. 

ATULSTTB. A. BreOhaupt, 1865, Berg. Httt., xxiv, 310 (Atlasit), f. 
Atlaserz, an old name for fibrous malachite. A fibrous or columnar var. 
of carbonate of copper containing chlorine, probably a mixture of azurite 
and atacamite. 

ATOPITB. A. E, Nardenakidld, 1877, Geol. F6r. FOrh., iii, 376 
(Atopii), f. arono^f 'unusual,' on account of its rarity. Antimonate 
of copper, occurring in yellow-brown octahedrons. 



ATTAOOUTB ^ AVALSTH 

ATTAOOLTTB. 0. W, BUymtrand, 1868, Dana Min., 580 (Attako- 
litb), f. ccTTaKevi, ' the salmon/ alluding to its color, and XiBoi. A. 
pale red phosphate of aluminum and other bases from Sweden. 

AUBRBAOHTTB. B. Hermann, 1858, Jour. Pk. Ch., Ixxiii, 209 
(Auerbachit), after Dr. J. Auerbach, who first described it. A brown- 
ish-gray yar. of zircon, containing an excess of silica. 

AUBRUTE. W, E, Hidden and J. B. Mackintoih, 1888, A. J. S., 
8d, xxxvi, 461, after Dr. Carl Auer von Welsbach, who invented the system 
of gas lighting which caused a demand for zircon, in the mining of which 
it was found, and Xi^oi. A hydrous phospho-sllicate of thorium, found 
in yellow or reddish crystals, with zircon. 

AUQBUTB. a W. BUmstrand, 1868, Dana Miu., 580 (Augelith), 
f. avyt'f, 'lustre,' from its appearance, and MBoi. A pale red hydrous 
phosphate of aluminum having a pearly lustre. 

AUaiTB. A, O. Werner, 1792, Berg. Jour., i, 243 (Augit), f. avy^, 
* lustre,' from its appearance. An aluminous var. of pyroxene of a dark 
green to black color. 

AUOU8TITB. Error for agustite. 

AURAUTB. P. A, v. Bomdorff, 1847, Glock. Syn., 85 (Auralit). f. 
the Aura Kiver, Finland, where it was found, and XiQo^. An obs. syn. 
of fab 1 unite. 

AURIOHAIiOITB. Th, Bditgei\ 1839, Pogg. Ann., xlviii, 495 
(Aurichalcit), f . aurichalcum, ' yellow copper ore, ' or bi-ass ore. Hydrous 
carbonate of zinc and copper, found in drusy crusts of pale green to sky- 
blue crystals. 

AURIPIQMBNT. From auripigmentum, an obs. name for orpi- 
ment. 

AUROTBLLURITB. /. D. Dana, 1837, Dana Min., 390, f. its 
composition. An obs. syn. of sylvanite. 

AUTOBCAIiITB. Error for automolite. 

AUTOMOLITB. A, Q. Ekeberg, 1806, Afh. i Fis., i, 84 (Automolit), 
f. avTofioXoi, 'a deserter,' because zinc was found in an unexpected 
place. A var. of gahnite, containing little or no iron. 

AUTUNTTB. H. J, Brooke and W. H MUler, 1852, B. and M. Min., 
519, f. Autun, France, its locality. Hydrous phosphate of uranium and 
calcium, occurring in bright yellow crystalline scales. 

Also used hj A, Leymerie, 1859, Ley. Min., ii, 346, for the oxide of 
chromium which colors the quartz in the neighborhood of Autun. 

AVAITB. jr. R Heddie, 1883, Encyc. Brit., xvi. 383, f. Ava, India, 
its locality. A var. of iridium. 

AVAUTB. 8. M. LosaniUch, 1884, Deut. Ch. Ges.. xvii, 1774 



AVANTURINB 24 BADDBLBTITB 

(Avalit), f. Mt. Avala, near Belgrade, its locality. A green earthy 
mineral containing chromium oxide, probably a mixture. 

AVANTURINB. Variant of aventurine. 

AVASITB. J. A. Krenner, 1881, F61d. Er., 11, 105 (Avasit), f. the 
Avas Valley, Hungary, its locality. A doubtful hydrous silicate of iron, 
not fully examined. 

AVENTURINXI. A kind of quartz spangled with mica, so called 
from its resemblance to artificial aventurine. 

AVENTURINB FBLDSPAR. An old name for sunstone, which 
may be ortboclase, albite or oligoclase. 

AVSNTURINB QUARTZ. See aventurine. 

AWARUrrxl. F. 8key, 1885, N. Z. Inst. Trans., xviii, 401, f. 
Awarua Bay, New Zealand, its locality. A terrestrial nickel-iron alloy, 
containing two parts of nickel to one of iron. 

AXBSTONB. A. O. Werner, 1797, Emm. Min., iii, 351 (Beilstein), 
because used for the manufacture of stone hatchets. An early name for 
nepbrite or jade. 

AXINTTS. R. J. HaUy, 1797. Jour, des M., v, 268, f. d^ivTj, 'an 
' axe,' alluding to the shape of its crystals. Silicate of aluminum, calcium, 
and manganese, occurring in wedge-shaped crystals of brown, blue, violet 
or gray color. 

AZORITIS. J. 2>. Dana, 1850, Dana Min., 396, f. the Azores, iU 
locality. An obscure colorless mineral, occurring in minute octahe- 
drons, supposed to be a columbate of calcium. 

AZOR-PYRRHITS. L. L. Hubbard, 1887, Min. Mitth., viii, 326, f. 
the Azores, its locality, and pyrrhite. A mineral occurring in minute 
orange-red crystals in trachite, perhaps identical with pyrrhite. 

AZX7RX3 SPAR. F. MoJis, 1820, Mobs Char., 63, f. its color. An 
obs. syn. of lazulite. 

AZURB STONZL From lapis lazuli. An old name for both 
lapis lazuli and lazulite. 

AZURITS. R. Jameson, 1805, Jam. Min., ii, 542, f. azure, alluding 
to its color. An obs. syn. of lazulite. 

Also used by F. 8. Beudant, 1824, Beud. Min., ii, 417, for hydrous 
blue carbonate of copper, occurring massive or in deep blue crystals. 

BABINQTONITXI. A. Levy, 1824, Ann. Phil., 2d, vii, 275, in honor 
of Dr. Wm. Babington. Silicate of magnesium, calcium and iron, 
occurring in black, triclinic crystals, in form like pyroxene. 

BAOON STONB. From Speckstein. An old name for a var. of 
steatite, alluding to its greasy appearance. 

BADDELSTTTXI. Z. Flftcher, 1898 (read 1892), Min. Mag., x, 148, 



BAOOrmi 25 BARAVITB 

after Joseph Baddeley, who found it. Zirconia, in black crystals, resem- 
bling columbite. 

BAOOrmi. 1889, Eg. Cat. Min., 192 (from a label in the School of 
Mines collection), f Bagot, Ontario, its locality. An unidentified min- 
eral on molybdenite. 

BAQRATIONITB. N, J. v. Kokseharow, 1847, Gor. Jour., i, 484, 
after P. R. Bagration, its discoverer. A var. of allanite. 

Also used by B. Hermann, 1862, Soc. Nat. Mosc. Bull., xzxv, 248, for 
a Tar. of bucklandite (epidote) containing a little cerium. 

BAIOAUTS. Seebaikalite. 

BAIBRIMB. F. 8. Beudant, 1882, Beud. Min., ii, 655, f. Baiem, 
' Bavaria,' where it was found. An obs. syn. of columbite. 

BAHIRITB. Variant of baierine. 

BAIKAUTB. ir. M. Renomnz, 1798, Chem. Ann., ii, 21 (Baicalit), 
f. Lake Baikal, Siberia, its locality. A dark-green var. of pyroxene 
nearly identical with sahlite. 

BAIEBRINITB. B. nermann, 1858, Jour. Pk. Ch., Ixxiii, 230 
(Baikerinit). A tar-like constituent of baikerite, whence the name. 

BAIKBRITB. B. Hermann, 1858, Jour. Pk. Ch., Ixxiii, 230 (Bai- 
kerit), f. Lake Baikal, Siberia, its locality. A waxy mixture of ozocerite 
and other hydrocarbons. 

[8. Variant of balas. 

Syn. of balas ruby. Etymology uncertain, perhaps f. 
Balakhsh, the name of the district where it was found. 

BAI«A8 RUBY. An old name for the ruby-spinel. 

BAIiDISSBRTTB. Error for baudisscrite. 

BAUJaSTBROSmz. W. Schulz and A, Paillette, 1850, Soc. Geol. 
Ft., 2d, vii, 16, in honor of Lopez Ballesteros. A stanuiferous var. of 
pyrites. 

BAIiTXMORITE. T. Thomean, 1848, Phil. Mag., 8d, xxii, 193, f. 
Baltimore, Md., its locality. A semi-fibrous mineral of bluish-green 
color, usually classed as a var. of serpentine. 

BAIiVRAIDITB. M. F. Heddle, 1880, Min. Mag., iv, 117. f. Bal- 
▼raid, Scotland, its locality. A doubtful hydrous silicate of aluminum, 
calcium and other bases, perhaps a rock. 

BAMUTB. A. Erdmann, 1842, Vet. Ak. Stock., 19 (Bamlit), f. 
Bamle, Sweden, its locality. A var. of fibrolite, occurriug in bluish or 
green plumose fibres. 

BANDI88BRITB. Error for baudisserite. 

BARAUTB. Error for bavalite. 

BARAVITB. Error for bavalite. 



BARBADOBS TAR 26 

BARBADOB8 TAR. An early name for asphaltum, in alluBion to* 
a well known locality. 

BAROBNITB. J. W. Mallet, 1878, A. J. 6.. 8d. xvi, 806, after 
M. Barcena, from whom the specimen was received. A doubtful anti- 
monate of mercury, fouud only in a very impure condition. 

BARBTTFTB. L. Bambkci 1868, Soc. It. Nat. Atti, ix, 109, after 
Prof. M. Baretti, its discoverer. A doubtful silicate of calcium, magne- 
sium and iron, containing also some carbon dioxide. 

BARIOALOrrB. E, 8. Dana, 1892, Dana Min., 269, f. its compo- 
sition. A var. of calcite, containing some barium carbonate. 

BARITB. J. D, Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 616, f. fidpo^, 'weight.' 
Sulphate of barium or heavy spar, earlier called barytes. 

BARmTE. Variant of barytite. 

BARSEVIEITB. TF. C. Brogger. 1887, Geol. F6r. FOrh., ix, 250 
(Barkevikit), f. Barkevik, Norway, its locality. A mineral near horn- 
blende, but differing from it in optical properties. 

BARSLTTTB. G. W. Stephen, 1865, Roy. Soc. Vic. Trans., 70, 
in honor of Gov. Sir Henry Barkly. A magenta-colored var. of 
ruby. 

BARNHARDTITB. F. A. Oenth, 1855, A. J. S., 2d, xix, 17, after 
D. Barnhardt, on whose land it was found. Sulphide of iron and 
copper, of a brass-yellow color, tarnishing easily to a bronze color. 

BAROUTB. R, Kirwan, 1794, Eirw. Min., 1, 184, f. barium and 
AxOo$. An obs. syn. of witherite. 

Also used erroneously for bavalite. 

BAROSBIiBNITB. R. Kirwan, 1784. Eirw. Min., 54,* f. fidpvi, 
* heavy,* and selenite. An obs. syn. of barite. 

BAROTE. Variant of bnrite. 

BARRANDITB. V. v. ZepJiarovicIi, 1867, E. Ak. Wien, Ivi, (1), 20 
(Barrandit), in honor of J. Barrande. Hydrous phosphate of aluminum 
and iron, found massive of vaiious shades of gray, blue and red. 

BARSOWTTE. O. Rose, 1839, Pogg. Ann., xlviii, 567 (Barsowit), f. 
Barsovskoi, Ural Mts., its locality. A granular massive mineral, snow* 
white in color, and very near anorthite. 

BARTHOLOMITB. P. T. Cleve, 1870, Vet. Ak. Stock. , ix, (12), 81, 
f. St. Bartholomew, W. I., its locality. A hydrous sulphate of iron and 
sodium, occurring in yellow nodules composed of small crystals. 

BARYUTB. a W. Blomstrand, 1876, Geol. F5r. F6rh., iii, 128 
(Barylit), f. fiapvi, 'heavy,' and XiBo^. Silicate of barium and alumi- 
num, found in colorless, semi-transparent, tabular crystals. 

BARTBILTTB. A. ^ogren and C, H, Lundstrdm, 1888, Vet Ak. 



BARY-8TRONTZANITB 27 BA8TNA8ITB 

Stock. Oef., xlv, 7 (Barysll), f. fiaftv^, * heavy/ and sllicium. A silicate 
of lead, found in wiiite, hexagonal crystals. 

BART-8TRONTIANITB. T. 8. TraiU, 1819, Ed. Phil. Jour., i, 
880, f. its composition. An obs. syn. of stromnite. 

BARTTB. Variant of barytes. 

BARYTB8. D. L. O. Karsisn, 1800, Karat. Tab., 38 (Baiyt), f. 
fidpvi, * heavy.' Barium sulphate, found in crystals or massive, and of 
various colors, often called heavy spar. See barite. 

BARTTINB. F. 8, Beudani, 1824, Beud. Min., 441. An obs. 
^yn. of barite. 

BARTTTTB. J, C, Delameiherie, 1795, Delam. T. T., iii, 460 (bari- 
tite). An obs. syn. of barite. 

BARTTOOAIiOITB. B. Kirtoan, 1794, Eirw. Min., i, 91, f. its 
composition. A mixture of calcite and barite not now recognized. 

Also used by H, J. Brooke, 1824, Ann. Phil., 2d, viii, 114, f. its com- 
position. Carbonate of barium and calcium, found in white or yellow 
ish crystals, and massive. 

BARYTOOBIiBSTTTE. E, R O locker, 1839, Glock. Min., 634 
(BarytocOlestin), f. T. ThovMorCe name Barytosulphate of strontian, 1836, 
Thom. Min., it, 11. A var. of barite containing strontium sulphate. 

BARTTOPHTIXTTB. E, F. Oheker, 1889, Glock. Min., 570 
(Barytophyllit), f. /Sdpvi, 'heavy,' and phyllite, because heavier than the 
other pbyllites. An obs. syn. of chloritoid. 

BABAIiTINB. L von Born, 1790, Bom Cat., i. 395, f. basalt, because 
found in it. An obs. syn. of augite. 

BABANTTB. Pliny, 77. Pliny Hist., Bk. 36, 11 (Basanites), L 
fidadvo^, * the touchstone.' A black var. of jasper used as a touchstone. 

BABANOMBLAN. F, v. Kobell, 1838, Eob. Min.. 318, f. fidadyoi, 
'the touchstone,' and fiiXd^, -dvo^, 'black.' because it gives a black 
streak. A var. of menaccanite, called also Eisenrose. 

BABIOBRINB. F 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 520, f. base 
and cerium, in the idea that it is a basic cerium compound. An obs. 
^yn. of bastn&site. 

WAflniTTTB. Z. /. IgeUtrom, 1892, Geol. FOr. FOrh., xiv, 307 (Basiliit), 
in honor of BasUius Yalentinus, who first mentions the reduction of anti- 
mony. Hydrous antimonate of manganese, found in steel-blue, bladed 
crystals. 

BASTTTB. FT. Eaidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 523 (Bastite), f. 
Baste, Hartz Mts., its locality. An impure foliated serpentine, the 
xesult of the alteration of pyroxene. 

BA8TNASITB. J. J. N. Huoi, 1841, Huot Min., i, 296 (Bastnaesite), 



BA8T0MITB 88 BUUIUTH 

f. Baatnfts, Swedeo, its locality. A fluo-carbonate of cerium, occurring 
in small imbedded masses, with a greasy lustre and wax-yellow color. 

BA8T0NXTB. A. Dea Ctaiesaux, 18(t3, Descl. Min., i, 408, f. 
Bastoigne, Luxemburg, its locality. A var. of mica occurring in large 
plates of a greenish-brown color. 

BATHVILLITB. /. F, WilUarru, 1868, Chem. News, yii, 188, f. 
Bathville, Scotland, its locality. A fossil resin found in lumps of a dull- 
brown color, in the Boghead coal. 

BATRAOHITB. A. Breithaupt, 1882, Breit. Char., 807 (Batrachit), 
f. fidvpaxoi, 'a frog,* in allusion to its green color. A pale greenish- 
gray var. of monticellite. 

BAnDlSSBRITXI. J. C. Delametherie, 1806, Jour, de Phys., Ixii, 
860, f. Baudissero, Piedmont, its locality. An obs. syn. of magnesite. 

BAULITE. J. Q. Forehhammer, 1848, Jour. Pk. Ch., xxx, 891 
(Baulit), f. Mt Baula, Faroe Is., its locality. A syn. of krablite. 

BAXTXTTB. Variant of beauxite. 

BAVAUTB. J. J. N. Huot, 1841, Huot Min., i, 880, f. Bavalon, 
Brittany, its locality. A. De% Claigeaux, 1862, Descl. Min., i, 470, says it 
is 6a« vallorit a local name for a small depression in that region. A hydrous 
silicate of iron, much like chamoisite. 

BATLDONTTB. A, U. Church, 1865. Jour. Ch. Soc., 2d, iii. 265, 
in honor of Dr. John Bayldon. Hydrous arsenate of copper and lead, 
found in minute mamillary concretions of a grass-green color. 

BBAN ORB. From Bohnerz, alluding to its appearance. A pop- 
ular name for limonite, when found in lenticular aggregations. Called 
also pea-ore, when found in small, rounded masses. 

BBAUMONTTTB. A. Levy, 1889, C. R., ix, 456, in honor of £lie 
de Beaumont, a French mineralogist. A syn. of heulandite, used for 
the Tarioty from Baltimore, Md. 

Also used by C7. T. Jackion, 1889, A. J. 8., xxxrii, 898. A var. of 
silicate of copper from Chessy, France. 

BBAUZTTB. A, Dufrenoy, 1847, Duf. Min., iii, 799 (index), f. 
Beaux, France, its locality. Hydrous oxide of iron and aluminum, 
occurring in white to yellow and red grains; also massive and clay-like. 

BBOOARTTB. (/. Grattarola, 1879, Soc. Tosc. Atti. It. 177, after 
Dr. O. Beccari, who brought the mineral from Ceylon. An olive-green 
var. of zircon. 

BBOHUJTB. ,;. JD. Dana, 1868. Dana Min., 697, after Prof. E. 
Bechi. who first analyzed it, and AiT^uS. A hydrous borate of calcium, 
found in white crusta as a deposit from springs. 

BBCKITB. See beckite. 



BBBaBBITB 29 BERGBCAMNITB 



O. A, Koenig, 1681, Am. Ch. Jour., ii, 879, after 
H. Beeger, of DeDver, Colo., from whom it was received. Bismuto- 
sulphide of lead, occurring in brilliant gray crystals. 

BBBKITE. A, Ihtfrenoy, 1847, Duf. Min., iii, 750 (Beckite), after 
Dr. Beek, Dean of Bristol, who first called attention to it. A chalce- 
donic pseudomorph after coral or shells, often called beckite. The speci- 
mens are locally known as beekites, the name probably being used prior to 
the reference given. 

BBFFANITB. 0, Maravigjia, 1831, Accad. Gioen., y, 157, in honor 
of Count Beffa-Negrina. An obscure mineral from Sicily, perhaps 
identical with anorthite. 

BBFFONim. Error for beffanite. 

BX2X4L BCBTAL ORE. An early name for tin pyrites, so called on 
account of its bronze color. 

BBLONBSITB. A. Scacehi, 1883, Nap. Ac. Rend.,, 282 (Belonesia), 
f. fieXdvrjt *a needle,' from the shape of its crystals. Minute white 
crystals belonging to the tetragonal system, and supposed to be molybdate 
of magnesium. 

BBLONrm. E. F. Qlocker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 27 (Belonit), f. 
fieXorrft * a needle,' in allusion to the shape of its crystals. An obs. syn. 
of aikinite. 

Also used by F, Zirk^l, 1867, Zt. Geol.. xix, 738. An undetermined 
mineral, perhaps a feldspar, found in microscopic, acicular crystals in 
certain volcanic rocks. 

BBBCBNnTB. O, A. Koenig, 1887, Acad. Nat. Sci., 311, in honor 
of C. S. Bement. A hydrous silicate of manganese, found in grayish- 
yellow, stellar aggregations, resembling pyrophyllite. 

BBNDEarrS. 8. Meunier, 1893, Meun. Fcrs Met.. 2*). f. Bendego, 
Brazil, where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 

BBRAUNITE. A, Breithaupt, 1841, Breit. Handb., 156 (Beraunit), f. 
Beraun, Bohemia, its locality. Hydrous phosphate of iron, occurring 
generally in brown, fibrous masses. 

BBRENaBIJTII. J, F. W. Johnston, iJ38, Phil. Mag., 3d. xiii. 
3S^, f. San Juan de Berengela, Peru, its locality. A brown, asphalt-like 
mineral, with a resinous lustre. 

BBRBSOFmi. a U. Shepard, 1844. Shep. Min., 121, f. Beresof, 
Ural Mts., its locality. An obs. syn. of crocoite. 

BBRaAMASKITB. P. Luchetti, 1881, Bol. Ac, 4th, ii. 397, f. 
ProY. Bergamo, Italy, its locality. A dark green var. of amphibole, 
containing' no magnesium. 

BBRaMANNITB. C, F, Schumacher, 1801, Sebum. Min., 46 



80 

(Bergman u it), in honor of T. Bergmann. An impure yar. of natrolite^ 
resulting from alteration. 

BERLAXTTTE. A, Schra'uf, 1882, Zt. Eryst., yi, 880 (Berlauit), f. 
Berlau, Bohemia, its locality. A doubtful chloritic mineral near yer* 
miculit«, found in serpentine. 

BERLINITB. C. W, Blamstraftd, 1868, Dana Min., 571, in honor 
of Prof. N. H. Berlin. Phosphate of aluminum, colorless, gray or pale 
red, occurring in compact masses like quartz. 

BBRNONrra. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 73, f. the mountain 

of Bemon, near Epernay, France, its locality. A doubtful hydrate of 
aluminum and calcium. 

BBRTHIERINB. F. 8, Beudani, 1882, Beud. Min., ii, 128, in honor 
of P. Berthier. A yar. of chamoisite, forming a bed of iron ore at 
Uayanges, France. 

BBRTHIERITZI. W, ffaidinger, 1827, Ed. Jour. Sci., yii, 858, after 
P. Berthier, who first examined it. Sulph-aotimonide of iron, occurring- 
in crystals and in steel-gray, fibrous or granular masses. See haldinger- 
ite, its earlier name. 

BBRTRANDITB. A. Dammr, 1888, Bull. Soc. Min., yi, 252, after 
E. Bertrand, who first called attention to it. Hydrous silicate of gluci* 
num, found in small, transparent, colorless crystals. 

BERTL. From /St/fjvWoi, An old name probably comprising 
more than one kind of green gem, but now confined to the silicate of 
glucinum, including emerald, aqua marine and other yarieties. 

BERTIjITB. Variant of beryl. 

BERYLIiONTTE. E. S. Dana, 1888, A. J. S., 3d, xxxyi, 290, sa 
named because it contains the rare element beryllium. An anhydroua 
phosphate of glucinum (beryllium) and sodium, occurring in transparent, 
colorless, orthorhombic crystals. 

BERZEIilANITE. J. D. Dana, 1850, Dana Min., 509, adapted 
from berzeline, K S. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 534, after Prof. Jacob- 
Berzelius, who first analyzed it. Selenide of copper, occurring in thin, 
silyer-white metallic crusts. 

Berzeline has also been used hj L. A. Netker, 1831, Bibl. Uniy., xlyi, 
52, as a syn., now obs., of the white yar. of haOynite. 

BERZELIITE. 0. B. Kuhn, 1840, Ann. Ch. Pharm., xxxiy, 211 
(Berzeliit), in honor of Prof. Jacob Berzelius. Arsenate of calcium, 
magnesium and manganese, found in yellow or orange masses. 

BERZELINE. Bee berzelianite. 

BERZELITE. E, D. Clarke, 1818, Ann. Phil., xi, 198, in honor of 
Prof. Jacob Berzelius. An obs. syn. of petalite. 



BBUDANTINB 81 BINNTTXI 

Also used by A, Levy, 1828, L^ Heul., ii, 448 (ed. 1837). A Bjn., 
-now obB., of mendipite. ^ 

BBUDANTINB. Variant of beudantite (nephelite). 

BBUDANTITB. A. Levy, 1826, Ann. Phil., 2d, xi, 195, in honor 
of Prof. F. S. Beudant. Hydrous sulphato-phosphate or arsenate of iron 
and lead, found in greenish-brown, rhombohedral crystals. 

Also used by N. Cavelli, 18S9, Nap. Ac. Atti, iv, 17 (Beudantina). 
An oba. 8yn.|0f nephelite. 

BBUSTTTB. A. Breithaupt, 1865, Berg. Hat., xxiv, 864 (Beustit), 
in honor of Freiherr von Beust. A grayish var. of epidote from the 
Tyrol. 

BBTRIOHITB. K. T. Liebe, 1871, Jahrb. Min., 840 (Beyrichit), in 
honor of £. Beyrich, his colleague. Sulphide of nickel, occurring in 
screw-shaped groups of crystals, of a lead-gray color and metallic lustre. 

BHREOKITB. (Pronounced vreckite.) M. F, Heddle, 1879. Min. 
Mag., iii, 57, f. Ben Bhreck, Scotland, its locality. Hydrous silicate of 
Iron, calcium and other bases, occurring as an apple-green coating on 
quartz. 

BIBBRITB. Error for bieberite. 

BIBBBRTTB. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 489 (Bieberit), f. 
Bieber, Hanau, its locality. Sulphate of cobalt, usually found as a red, 
crystalline crust on other minerals. 

BIBBRTTE. Variant of bieberite. 

BIBIROSITE. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 49, probably an error 

for bleirosite, perhaps f. blei, 'lead,' and rose, alluding to its composition 
and appearance. A syn. of dembachite. 

BIBIiEITB. Seebjelkite. 

"■^ O. Benko and K, Jahn, 1886, Sieb. Verb., xxxvi, 85, in 



bonor of £. A. Bielz. A brownish hydrocarbon near piauzite. 

BIHARITB. K, F. Peters, 1861, K. Ak. Wien., xliv, 132(Biharit), f. 
the Bihar Mts., Hungary, its locality. A hydrous silicate of aluminum, 
potassium and other bases, found in granular masses of a yellowish 
color. 

BZNDHBIBSrnEk -jT: 2>. liana, 1868, Dana Min., 591, after J. J. 
Bindheim, its first describer. Hydrous antimonate of lead, occurring 
massive, or in whitish or yellow crusts on other ores of antimony. 

BINNTTB. A. Dee Claieeaux, 1855, Ann. des M., 5th, viii, 889, f. 
Binnenthal, Switzerland, its locality. Sulph -arsenide of copper, found 
in brilliant, black, isometric crystals. 

Also used by C. Heueser, 1855, Pogg. Ann., xciv, 885 (Binnit), as a 
lyn. of sartorite. 



TU ■ M ■»■ » ' 



BIOnNB 82 BI8MU 

BIOnNB. r. Monticelli and N. CoveUi, 1825, Mont Gov., 488 

« 

(Biotina), in honor of Prof. J. B. Biot. An obs. syn. of anortbite. 

Also by an error used for piotine. 

BIOTTTB. J. F. L, Eauitnann, 1847, Hausm. Mln. , i, 671 (Biotit), 
after Prof. J. B. Biot, who first called attention to the optical differences 
in mica. Silicate of magnesium, iron, aluminum and potassium; a 
member of the mica group. 

BIPHOSPHAMMITB. C. U. Shepard, 1870, Rural Car., i. 471. f. 
its composition. Native biphosphate of ammonium, occurring as an 
efiiorescence on phosphammite. 

BISOHOFTTE. C. Ochsenius, 1877, Die Bildung der Steinsalzlager, 
156 (Biscbofit). in honor of Dr. K. Q. Bischof , and also in remembrance of 
F. Bischof, director of the Stassfurt salt works. Hydrous magnesium 
chloride found in thin layers with halite. 

Also used by H. Fue?ier, 1862, Jahrb. Mln., 466. An obs. syn. of 
plumbogummite. 

BI8HOPVILLITE. A, Dvfrenoy, 1856, Duf. Min., iii, 621, f. Bishop- 
ville, S. C, its locality. An obs. syn. of shepardite. 

BISMITE. J. 2). Dana, 1868. Dana Min., 185, f . bismuth. Native 
oxide of bismuth, of a yellow or greenish color. 

BISMUTH. The element as a mineral, usually called native bismuth. 

BISMUTHAURITB. C. U. Sliepard, 1857, Shep. Min., 804. f. bis- 
muth and aurum, on account of its composition. A very doubtful com- 
pound of bismuth and gold, perhaps artificial. 

BISMUTH BLENDE. A. Breilhaupt, 1827, Pogg. Ann., ix, 275 
(Wlsmuthblende). An obs. syn. of eulytite. 

BISMUTH COBALT. C. M. Kersten, 1826, Jour. Ch. Ph., xlvii, 
265 ( Wismuthkobalterz), f. its supposed composition. A syn. of smaltite. 

BISMUTH OLANOE. A syn. of bismuthinite, used by old writers. 

BISMUTH GOLD. A var. of native gold containing bismuth. 

BISMUTH NICKEL. J. D, Dana, 1844, Dana Min., 472, f. iU 
composition. A syn. of grOnauite. 

BISMUTH OCHRE. A. O. Werner, 1791, Wern. Pabst., 188 (Wis- 
muthokker). A syn. of bismite. 

BI8MX7TH SILVER. C. J. 8elb, 1798, Chem. Ann., i, 10(Wismuth. 
isches Silber). f. its composition. A syn. of schapbachite. 

BISMUTHINE. See bismuthinite. 

BISMUTHINITE. J. D. Dana, 1868. Dana Min. . 80, f . BUmuthine, 
F. 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 418. f. bismuth. Sulphide of bis- 
muth , occurring massive, of a lead-gray color and metallic lustre, or in 
orthorbombic crystals. 



KS MUTHITJJ 88 BLACK TBLLURinM 

BZSMUTHITB. Variant of blsmutite. 

BISBCUTITB. A, Breiihaupt, 1841, Pogg. Ann., liii, 627 (Bismutit), 
f . bismuth. Hydrous carbonate of bismuth, found in yellowish or green- 
ish incrustations and nodules. 

BXSBflUTOFBRRITB. A. Frenul, 1871, Jour. Pk. Ch., 2d, iv, 355 
(Bismutoferrit), f . its composition. Silicate of bismuth and iron, forming 
part of the mixture earlier called hjrpochlorite. 

BISMUTOLABSPRITB. E. F. Qloeker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 27 (Bis- 
mutholamprit), f. bismuth and Xajuitpoi, 'shining.' An obs. syn. of 
bismuthinite. 

BISBSUTOBPHIBRITB. A. Weisbaeh, 1877, Jahrb. Berg. Hat, t, 
40 (Bismutospheerit), f. bismuth, and its form. Anhydrous carbonate 
of bismuth, found iu spherical forms with a fine, fibrous structure. 

BITTBB SPAR. Jf. K Klaproth, 1784, Ges. Nat. Berl. Schrift., t, 
103 (BiitcrtfiNitb), because it contains magnesia, the salts of which are often 
bitter. A syn. of dolomite. 

BTTUBSBN. A syn. of usphaltuiii. 

BTTUBSBNITB. Wm. Traill, 1853, Roy. Soc. Ed., zxi, 7, f. its 
composition. A syn. of torbanite. 

BITUMBNOUS OOAZi. A var. of coal containing much volatile 

matter. 

BiTUBSBNOUS WOOD. A var. of brown coal much resembling 

wood. 

BJBLKXTB. E, ^ogren, 1878, Geol. F5r. F5rh., iv, 106 (Bjelkit), f. 
the BJelke mine, Sweden, its locality. A syn. of cosalite. 

BLACK AMBBR. A popular name for Jet, now obsolete. 

BLAOE BAND. A popular name for siderite, as it is sometimes 
found interstratified with coal, showing a banded structure. 

BIjAOE OOBAIiT. An old name for asbolite or earthy cobalt. 

BIjAOE copper. One of the old names for melaconite. 

BLACK ESIIMLATITB. An obs. syn. of psilomelane. 

BLACK IRON ORB. A syn. of magnetite. 

BLACK JACK. A miners' name for sphalerite, or zinc blende. 

BLACK LB AD. A syn. of graphite. 

BLACK LBAD ORB. A. O. Werner, 1791, Wem. Pabst., 116 
(Schwarz-Bleierz). An early name for the black var. of cerussite. 

BLACK MANOANB8B. A name formerly used for both psilome- 
lane and hausmannite. 

BLACK SILVBR ORB. One of the eariiest names for stephanite. 

BLACK TELLURIUM. A. Aikin, 1814, Aik. Min., 71, f. its color 
and composition. A syn. of nagyagite. 



BLACK WAD 84 BLUB JOHN 

BIjAOK wad. An early name for several mineralB, including 
graphite and the softer manganese oxides. 

BLAOKMORTTB. a, a Peale, 1878. Hayd. Surv. for 1872, 169, f. 
Mt Blackmore, Montana, its locality. A yar. of opal. 

BIiAEBITB. J. D, Dana, 1850, Dana Min., 447, after J. H. Blake, 
who analyzed it, A hydrous iron sulphate not fully investigated. 

BLATTBRINB. J. J. N, Huoi, 1841, Huot Min., i, 180, f. the old 
name Blftttererz, referring to its foliated form. An obs. syn. of nagya- 
gite. 

BLBINIBRB. D, Z. O. Karaten, 1800, Earst. Tab., 50, f. Blei, 
'lead,' and Niere, 'kidney,' alluding to its reniform shapes. An obs. 
syn. of bindheimite. 

BLBINIBRITB. Variant of bleiniere. 

BLBNDB. Q. Agrieola, 1546, Agric., 479, f. blenden, ' to deceive,' 
because it resembles lead ore but affords no lead. A syn. of sphalerite. 

BLIND GOAL. An early name for anthracite, perhaps because it 
burns without flame. 

BLCBDITE. J. F. John, 1811, John Unt., v, 240 (B15dit), in honor 
of Carl A. Bl5de. Sulphate of magnesium and sodium, from the salt 
mines of Ischel, Austria, where it occurs in red, fibrous masses. 

BLOM8TRANDITB. O. Lindstrom, 1874, Geol. F5r. FOrh., ii, 162 
(Blomsti-andit), in honor of Prof. C. W. Blomstrand of Lund. A mass- 
ive, black, hydrous columbo- titanute of uranium. 

BLOODSTONB. The popular name for heliotrope, so called from 
the fancied resemblance of the red spots to drops of blood. 

Also, as a translation of haematites, used occasionally in the older 
works OD minerals as a syn. of hematite. 

BLUE ASBB8TX7S. A popular name for crocidolite, on account of 
its color and fibrous structure. 

BLUB CALAMINE. A syn. of aurichalcite. 

BLUE COPPER. An old name for both azurite and covellite. 

BLUE FELDSPAR, if. ff, Klapr9th, 1795, Klap. Beit., i, 14 
(Blauer Feldspath), f. its color and appearance. A syn. of lazulite. 

BLUE IRON EARTH. An old name for an earthy var. of vivianite. 

BLUE IRONSTONE. M. H. Klaprotli [1811, Oes. Nat. Berl. Mag., 
T, 72], 1821, Leon. Orykt, 869 (Blau-Eisenstein), f. its color and composi- 
tion. An obs. syn. of crocidolite. 

BLUETTE. S, H, Emmens, 1892, Am. Ch. Soc. Jour., xiv, 207, in 
honor of Archibald Blue, Director of the Bureau of Mines of Ontario. 
Nickeliferous pyrite, probably a mixture. 

BLUE JOHN. A miners' name for fluorite. 



BLUB IiBAD ORB 85 BO<K)S]:.OV8EITB 

BLUE LBAD ORB. An old name, for a compact var. of galenite 
of a bluisb-gray color. 

BLUE MALAOhxTJU. Odo of the earliest names for azurite. 

BLX7B OPAL. 21 Allan, 1814, Allan Min. Nomen., 86, f. ite color, 
and because it had been earlier classed with opal. An obs. syn. of 
lazulite. 

BLUB SCHORL. J, L. Bourmn, 1788, De L. Cryst., ii, 406 (Schorl 
bleu). The earliest name for octahedrite. 

BLUB SPAR. K Steffens, 1811, Steff. Orykt., 1,420 (Blauspath). 
An obs. syn. of lazulite. 

BLUB8TONB. An early popular name for copper sulphate, applied 
to the natural mineral (chalcanthite), as well as to the artificial salt. 

BLUE TALO. B. Q. Sage, 1784, Sage Cab., 154 (Talc bleu). An 
obs. syn. of cyanite. 

BLUE VITRIOL. The old name of the salt, sulphate of copper, 
used for the mineral. 

BLUB ZEOLTTB. A. Cronstedt, 1758, Crons. Min., 100 (Zeolites 
Bloa). An early name for lapis lazuli. 

BLUMENBAOHTTB. A. Breithaupt, 1866, Berg. Hat., zxii, 193 
{Blumenbachit), after J. F. Blumenbach, who had called it Brauustein- 
blende. A syn. of alabandite. 

BLUMTTB. K FUcher, 1862, Jahrb. Min., 466 (Blumit), in honor 
of Prof. J. R Blum. An obs. syn. of bindheimite. 

Also used by K, T, LUbe, 1868, Jahrb. Min., 652. A syn. of mega- 
basite. 

BOART. Variant of bort. 

BOBTERRITB. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 795, after A. 
Bobierre, who first described it. A phosphate of magnesium, occurring 
in minute white crystals in guano. 

BODBNITB. A. Breithaupt, 1844, Pogg. Ann., Ixii, 273 (Bodenit), 
f. Boden, Saxony, its locality. A mineral closely related to muromontite. 

BOO BUTTER. E. Luck, 1845, Ann. Ch. Pharm., liv, 125. A 
«yn. of butyrellite, a butter-like hydrocarbon found in bogs. 

BOG IRON ORE. The old name for the porous var. of limonite 
found in marshy places, called also bog ore. 

BOO BCANGANE8E. The popular name for a light, porous var. 
of wad. 

BOO ORB. See bog iron ore. 

BOGHEAD OOAL. A popular name for the coal from Boghead, 
Scotland; called also torbanite. 

BOGOSLOVSKITB. M, F. Heddle, 1883, Encyc. Brit., xvi, 411, f. 



BOHEMIAN GARNBT 86 BOBAOITB 

Bogoslovsk, Ural, its locality. An impure silicate of copper, near 
chrysocolla. 

BOHSMXAN OARNBT. Pyrope found in Bohemia is often socalled. 

BOHBMXAN RUBT. A Jewelers' name for rose quartz when cut 
as a gem. 

BOHBMTAN TOPAZ. A jewelers* name for yellow quartz when 
cut as a gem. 

BOLB. An old name, f. fioSXoi, 'a clod of earth,' for a dark-colored 
clay, probably not to be classed with any distinct mineral. 

BOLEITB. B. Mallard and E, Cumenge, 1891, 0. R., cxiii, 619, f. 
Boleo, Lower California, its locality. Hydrous chloride of lead, copper 
and silver, found in minute indigo-blue crystals. 

BOLBRBTINB. Error for boloretine. 

BOLIVIANITE. A. BreiUiaupt, 1866, Berg. Hat. , zxv, 188 (Bolivian), 
f. Bolivia, where it was found. An uncertain sulph-antimonide of silver. 

BOLIVITE. /. Domeyko, 1878, Min. Chili, 6th App., 19. f. Bolivia, 
its locality. A very uncertain oxy-sulphide of bismuth derived from the 
decomposition of bismuthinite. 

BOLOGNA BPAR. Variant of bologna stone. 

BOLOGNA 8TONB. An early name for barite, f. Bologna, its 
locality; the Lapis Bononiensis of old authors. 

BOLOPHBRTTB. A. Breithaupt, 1847, Breit. Haudb.. iii, 582 (Bo- 
lopherit), f. fiooXoi, 'earth,' and tpepeir, 'to bear,' that is, 'ore bringer,' 
because valuable minerals are often found with it. An obs. syn. of 
hedenbergite, an iron calcium pyroxene. 

BOLORETINB. J. Q. Forchhammer [1839, Kong. Dan. Vid. Sels.], 
1840, Jour. Pk. Ch., xx, 459 (Boloretin), f. ftooXoi, 'a clod of earth,' and 
fitjTtvrj, * resin,' because it is a resin of earthy appearance. A resin near 
fichtelite, derived from peat. 

BOLTONTTB. 0. U, Shepard, 1832, Shep. Min., p. ix, f. Bolton, 
Mass., its locality. A var. of forsterite. occurring in imbedded grains. 

BOMBIOOITB. E, Bechi, 1873, Min. Tosc., ii, 858, after Prof. L. 
Bombicci, who first described it. A transparent, colorless hydrocarbon, 
occurring in lignite. 

BONB TX7RQUOI8B. A popular name for odontolite. 

BONONIAN STONB. Variant of bolouian or bologna stone. 

BONSDORFFITB. T, Thomson, 1836, Tbom. Min.. i, 828, after 
P. A. V. Bonsdorff, who first described it. An obs. syn. of fahlunite. 

BORAOITB. A, O, Werner, 1789, Berg. Jour., i, 393 (Borazit), f. 
borax. Chloro-borate of magnesium, found in small white or reddish 
crystals, or in soft white masses. 



BORAX 87 BOXTLANaBBITB 

BORAX. From borag. Native borate of sodium. 

BORDITB. A. Dvfrenay, 1859, Duf. Hin., iv, 696, f. Bord5e, one 
of the Far5e Is., its locality. A very compact and tough var. of okenite. 

B0RD08ITE. E, B&rirand, 1872, Ann. des M., 7th, i, 412. f. Los 
Bordos, Chili, its locality. A very doubtful chloride of silver and mer- 
cury, resulting from the decomposition of amalgam. 

BORIOKTTB. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 588, after E. Boricky, 
who had examined it. Hydrous phosphate of iron and calcium, found 
in reniform masses of a reddish-brown color and waxy lustre. 

BORNINB. See bornite. 

BORNTTB. F. S. Beudant, 1882, Baud. Min., ii, 588 (Bomine), after 
L von Bom, who first noticed it. An obs. syn. of tetradymite. 

Also used by W. Haiding&r, 1845, Haid. Haiidb., 562 (Bornit), for a 
sulphide of copper and iron, showing variegated colors and often called 
purple copper. 

BOROOALOITB. Contracted from hydroborocalcite. 

BOROttLAaNBSITB. P. Groth, 1874, Oroth Tab., 38 (Boromag. 
nedt), f. its composition. A syn. of szaibelyite. 

BORONATROOALOITB. O. X. UU^, 1849, Ann. Ch. Pharm., Izx, 
19 (Boronatrocaldt), f. its composition. The earliest name of ulexite. 

BORT. Of uncertain etymology. A diamond not fine enough to- 
be cut as a gem. 

B08JBBIANITB. J, D. Dana, 1868, Dana MId., 654, f. the Bosjeman 
River, So. Africa, its locality. A sulphate of aluminum, manganese 
and magnesium, found as an incrustation. 

BOTAIXAOKITB. A. H. Church, 1865, Jour. Ch. Soc.. 2d. iii, 
212, f. the Botallack mine, Cornwall, its locality. A var. of atacamite,^ 
contaioing more than the normal amount of water. 

BOTRTITB. Variant of botryte. 

BOTRYOGBN. W. Haidinger, 1828, Pogg. Ann., xii, 491, f. pSrpvi^ 
'a bunch of grapes,' and yevvdv, *to bear,* referring to its form. A 
ferro-ferric sulphate, containiug also magnesium and calcium, and found 
in reniform and botryoidal shapes, of a deep red color. 

BOTRTOUTE. J, F. L. Hausmann, 1808. Moll. Jahrb. Efem, 
iv, 893 (Botryolit), f. fiorpvS, *a bunch of grapes,' from its form, and 
Xt^oi, A var. of datolite. found in botryoidal shapes. 

BOTRTTB. E. F. Olacker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 800 (Botryt), f. 
fiSrpvi, 'a bunch of grapes,' from its form. An obs. syn. of botryogen. 

BOTTLB STONE. An old name for chrysolite, or any other mineral, 
which can be melted directly into glass. 

BOUZaANaERTTE. M. C. /. TJiauloxo, 1837, Pogg. Ann., xli, 216 



BOOJbONRS 88 BRASS ORB 

^BiHiliui^^rUX afler C. L. Boulanger, who first described it; Sulphide 
K>t tuitiiuouy aud lead* occurring usually in plumose masses of a bluish- 
iiVH) cvlur. 

IK>UXiOMlTfi. J. a Delametherie, 1797, Delam. T. T., U. 24, f. 
lU»ulu»{ita vHoIogua). Italy, its locality. An obs. syn. of barite. 

HOURBOUUTB. J. Lrfart, 1862, C. R., Iv. 949. f. Bourboule, 
KiuiKt^. ilA Ivitility. An impure var. of melanterite, derived from the 
\^\uIhIu»u \>t marcaaite. 

IK>UKNOKITfi. R. Jameson, 1805. Jam. Min., ii, 579. after Count 
J. t. Uouvuou. who first described it. Sulph-antimouide of lead and 
vH»l»)H>i. I'ouud in brilliant black crystals. 

A)Hi» uitcd by J. A, H, Lucas, 1818, Lucas Tab., ii, 216. An obs. 
j^vu. \^i ikbivUte. 

HOUaHINaAULTTTB. E, Bechi, 1864, C. R.. Iviii, 583, in honor 
v^t J ti tWniHiiiugault. A somewhat doubtful sulphate of magnesium 
i4U\l muuuukium. occurring in the Tuscan lagoons. 

HQWfiNITB. J, D, Dana, 1850, Dana Min., 265, after G. T. 
(K'Wi^it, who tlmt described it. A compact, hard, whitish var. of serpen- 
iluo, M>«K4ubUug nephrite. 

HQWUNaiTB. J, B. Hannay, 1877, Min. Mag., i, 154, f. Bowling, 
MsnaUuvl. ItM UK^ality. A somewhat doubtful var. of saponite. 

HHA AHXUTB. F, Alger, 1844, Alger Phil.. 464, perhaps after C. P. 
Uuul. i4 hVouch mineralogist. An obs. syn. of ruby silver. 

HHAPMBBUSOHITE. A, Boring, 1880, Zt. Geol., xxxii, 711 
vUuoKoiu^«v^UiO, after D. L. 6rackebusch,who first described it. Vana- 
\Wv \A \\>^\\^ tHHUirring in small, black crystals, closely related to des- 

HH AdATIONITB. Error for bagrationite. 

HHAaiTB. />. Forbes and T. Bahll, 1855. Mag. Nat., viii, 227 
^lUa^UV attvr Umgl. a Scandinavian deity. A mineral occurring in 
Uvowi^. <««hatfoiml crystals, not fully examined, but referred both to 
4X\\ka\ \k\\\\ Cvrgyuoulte. 

HH ANC^HITB. /'. Sari, 1842. Jahrb. Min., 459 (Branchit). in honor 
vU V\\^\ ^ HrHUohl. of Pisa. A mineral resin near hartite, found in 
UmaU \y\\\v^ wood 

HHANUMTB. L, LUhener, 1846. Haid. Bor.. 1. 4 (Brandisit), in 
U\u^^ \^i \1omout. (Vmnt of Brandis. A greenish var. of cliutonite. 

HHANDTITB. A. K, NordenskiiM, 1888, Vet. Ak. Stock, Oefv.. 
\lv. US vUvHudtitV in honor of Prof, and Mint-Master Georg Brandt. 
U.\NU\«\uHVtiouatt* of manganese and calcium, found in small, white crystals. 

MiAM ORB, K A. ir Patrin, 1788. Jour, de Pbys., xxxiii, 96 



BRAUNTTB 89 BREUNNERTTB' 

(Mine de Laiton), because it contaiDS both copper and ziuc. An early 
name for aurichalcite. 

BRAUNmi. W, Haidinger, 1881, Roy. Soc. Ed., xi, 188 (read 
1827), in honor of Eammerath Braun, of Gotba. Oxide of manganese, 
found in brown, octahedral crystals. 

Also used by 8, Meunier, 1898, Meun. Fers Met., 14, f. Braunau, 
Bohemia, where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 

BRAVAI8ITE. E. Mallard, 1878, Ball. Soc. Min., i, 5, in honor of 
Prof. A. Bravais. A hydrous silicate of aluminum, iron and other 
bases, quite near glauconite. 

BRAZTLIAW OHRTSOLTTXI. A Jewelers' name for yellowish- 
green tourmaline, cut as a gem. 

BRAZEUAN EMERALD. A Jewelers' name for green tourma- 
line, cut as a gem. 

BRAZILIAN PEBBLE. A popular name for colorless transparent 
quartz, such as is used for optical purposes. 

BRAZILIAN RUBT. A jewelers' name for red tourmaline, cut as 
a gem. 

Also sometimes applied to Brazilian topaz which has been turned red 
by heat. 

BRAZILIAN SAPPHIRE. A jewelers' name for transparent blue 
tourmaline (iudicolite), cut as a gem. 

BRAZILIANITE. J, Mawe, 1818, Mawe Cat., 54, f. Brazil, where 
he had found it. An obs. syn. of wavellitc. 

BRAZILITE. E. ffuMak, 1892, Jahrb. Min., ii, 141 (Brazilit), f. 
Brazil, the country where it was found. A syn. of baddelejite. 

BREDBERQITE. J. D, Dana, 1868. Dana Min., 270, after B. O. 
Bred berg, who first described it. A var. of iron garnet. 

BREISLAOHTTE. Variant of breislakite. 

BREISLABTTE. G. B, Brocchi, 1817, Brocchi Cat., 28, in honor of 
Prof. S. Breislak. A fibrous or wool-like var. of pyroxene from 
Vesuvius. 

BREITHAnPTITE. TT. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 559 
(Breithauptit), in honor of Prof. A. Breitbaupt. Antimonide of nickel, 
in appearance resembling metallic copper. 

Also used by E, J. Chapman, 1848, Chap. Min., 125, for Breithaupt's 
kupferindig, the first name of covellite. 

BREUNERTTE. Variant of breunnerite. 

BREUNNERTTE. W, Haidinger, 1825, Haid. Mohs, i, 411 
(Breunnerit), in honor of Count Breunner. A ferriferous var. of mag- 
nesite. 



SR J J ViOiTl l 40 

BRZnriOmi. p. Stnmey&r, 1884, Berz. Jabres., xIt, 179 (Brevlcit), 
f. Brevig, Norway, its locality. A syn. of bergmannite. 

BRBW8TERITB. K J. Brooke, 1822. Ed. Pbil. Jour., yI, 112, in 
bonor of Sir Dayid Brewster. Hydrous silicate of aluminum, barium 
and strontium, occurring in small, wbite, pearly crystals. 

BRBWSTBRIiINB. See brewsterlinite. 

BREWSTBRUNTTB. /. D. Dana, 1850, Dana Min., 559 (Brew- 
sterline). after Sir David Brewster, who first called attention to It. A 
transparent fluid, composition unknown, found in the cavities of crys- 
tals. 

BRBWSTOUNE. Variant of brewsterline. 

BRIQHT WHITB COBALT. A syn. of cobaltite. 

BRITTIiE SUiVBR ORE. A syn. of stephanite. 

BROOHANTITE. A. Levy, 1824, Ann. PbU., 2d, viii, 241, in honor 
of Prof. A. J. M. Brocbant de Villiers. A sulphate and hydrate of 
copper, found in groups and masses of acicular, bright green ciystals. 

BROGGBRITE. C. W. Blomstrand, 1884, Geol. FOr. F5rh., vii, 59 
(BrOggerit), after W. C. BrOgger, its discoverer. A uranium mineral, 
its exact relations not determined, but closely allied to cleveile. 

BROMAROYRITB. A. Leymerie, 1859, Ley. Min., ii, 885, f. Brom. 
* bromine,' and dpyvpoi, ' silver,' from its composition. A syn. of 
bromyrite. 

BROMITB. W. Haidinger, 184p. Haid. Handb., 506 (Bromit), f. 
bromine, because it contains it. An obs. syn. of bromyrite. 

BROMLITB. T. Tliomaon, 1837, Pbil. Mag., 3d, xi, 45, f. Bromley 
{or Brownley) Hill, Alston Moor, Eng., its locality. Carbonate of 
barium and calcium, found in minute, ortborhombic crystals; at first called 
barytocalcite. 

BROMYRITE. J. D. Dana, 1854, Dana Min., 93, f. the eariier form 
bromite, a word already in use in chemistry. Bromide of silver, found 
in yellow or greenish masses. 

BRONONARTIN. J. J, N, Huot, 1841, Huot Min., i, 331, in honor 
of Prof. A. Brougniart. An obs. syn. of brocbantite. 

BRONQNIARDITE. A. Damour, 1849, Ann. des M., 4th, xvi, 227. 
in honor of A. Brongniart. Sulph-antimonide of silver and lead, occurring 
in blackish-gray octahedrons. 

BRONGNIARTINB. K. C. v. Leonhard, 1826, Leon. Orykt., 270 
(Brongniartin), after A. Brongniart, who described it. An obs. syn. of 
glauberite. 

BRONQNIARTITE. Variant of brongniarditc. 

BRONZTTB. D. L. O. Karsten, 1807, Jour. Ch. Ph. Min., iv, 151 



BROOKITB 41 BUOH8TABSITB 

(BroDzit), f. its color. A bronse-colored var. of enstatite, at first oonsid- 
ered a distinct spedes. 

BROOKITB. A. lAvy, 1885, Ann. Phil., 2d, ix, 142, in honor of 
U. J. Brooke. Titanic acid, occurring in reddish-brown to black, ortho- 
rhombic crystals. 

BROSim. Variant of brossite. 

BR088ITB. 0, K Hirtel, 1850, Zt. Pharm., ii, 24 (Brossit), f. 
Brosso Valley, Piedmont, its locality. A columnar var. of dolomite, 
containing about ten per cent of carbonate of iron. 

BROWN ASBB8T08. An early name for anthophyllite, alluding 
to its color and structure. 

BROWN OOAZf. A popular name for a var. of bituminous coal 
containing much Tolatile matter. 

BROWN HBBCATITB. An old name, at first including all Tarie- 
ties of hydrous iron oxide, but now confined to limonito. 

BROWN IRON ORE. An early syn. of brown hematite. 

BROWN TiTlAD ORE. An early name for brown pyromurphite. 

BROWNLITE. Variant of bromlite, due to the fact that the locality 
is sometimes called Brownley Hill. See bromlite. 

BROWN SPAR. A popular unme, used for those varieties of dolo- 
mite, ankerite and roagnesite, which turn brown on exposure. 

BRUOTTE. Oeo. Gibbs, 1819, A. J. S.. i, 489, after Prof. A. Bruce, 
its discoverer. An obs. syn. of choudrodite. 

Also used by F. 8. Beudani, 1824, Beud. Min., 838, for hydrate of 
magnesium, occurring in crystals and plates, ofteu exhibiting a pearly lustre. 

Also used by A, Dirfrenoy, 1847, Duf. Hin., ii, 618. An obs. syn. of 
xindte. 

BRUOENERELIilTE. J, D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 748, after 
L. BrQckner, who first described it, and A/l9o?. A white, crystalline 
hydrocarbon, separated from brown coal by alcohol. 

BRXTIAOHTTE. W. I. Macadam, 1886, Min. Mag., yii, 42, after 
Loch Bhniithaich, Scotland, its locality. A name given to a peculiar 
form of fluorite, occurring as a crystalline crust on barite. 

BRU8HITE. O, B. Moore, 1864, Acad. Cal, iii, 167, in honor of 
Prof. Q. J. Brush. Hydrous phosphate of calcium, found with guano 
in colorless or pale yellow, monoclinic crystals. 

BUOARAMANQITE. /. D. Dana, 1868, Dana 3Iin., 741. f. Buca- 
ramanga. New Granada, its locality. A fossil resin, near walchowite. 

BUOBOLZITB. R. Brandei, 1819, Jour. Ch. Ph., xxv, 125, in 
honor of Prof. C. F. Bucholz. A syn. of librolite. 

BUOHSTABIITE. Error for bustamite. 



BUOKIMami 42 B7BRITB 

BUOKXNaiTB. Q. Linek, 1888, Jahrb. Min., i, 218 (Backingit), \it 
honor of Prof. H. Backing. Hydrous sulphate of iron, found in thick, 
tabular, monoclinic crystals, of a brown color. 

BUOEULNDrm. A. Levy, 1824, Ann. Phil., 2d, yii, 184, in honor 
of Dr. Wm. Buckland. An anhydrous var. of allanite, occurring in 
small, black crystals. 

Also used by R, Hermann, 1862, Soc. Nat. Mosc. Bull., xxxv, 248 
(Buckland it). A Tar. of epidote, differing from ordinary epidote in the 
form of its crystals. 

BUURSTONB. Probably so called because of its roughness. A 
cellular var. of quartz used for millstones. 

BUNSBNINB. J, A. Krenner [1877. Term. FOz.. 1st pt.], 1877, Zt. 
Kryst., i, 614 (Bunsenin), in honor of Prof. R. W. Bunsen. A syn. of 
krennerite. 

BUNSENTTE. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Mhi., 184, in honor of Prof. 
R. W. Bunsen. Oxide of nickel, occurring in very small, green crys- 
tals. 

BUN8ITB. N. Nordenskidld, 1849, Nord. Atom. Ch. Min. Syst., ISO 
(BuDsit), in honor of Prof. R. W. Bunsen. An obs. syn. of parisite. 

BURATTm. A. Delesse, 1846. Ann. Ch. Phys., 8d, xviii. 478, after 
Prof. A. Burat, in whose collection it was found. A var. of aurichalcite 
containing lime, probably as a mixture. 

BURUNQTONITE. 8. Meunier, 1893, Meun. Fers Met., 49, f. 
Burlington, N. Y., where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 

BURMTTB. F. Naetling, 1893. Geol. Surv. India Records, xxvi. 88, 
f. Burma, where it was found. A fossil resin. 

BUSHMANTTB. E. 8. Dana, 1892. Dana Min.. 955. A syn. of 
bosjemanite, of which it is the translation. 

BUSTAMENTITB. Adam, 1869. Adam Tab., 67, in honor of 

Gen. A. Bustamente. A native iodide of lead. 

BUSTAMITB. A. Brongniart, 1826, Ann. Sci. Nat, viii, 411. in 
honor of Gen. A. Bustamente. A calciferous var. of rhodonite, of a 
grayish -red color. 

BUTTERMUjE SILVBR. a popular name for an earthy var. of 
cerargyrite, so named from its appearance. 

BUTYRELIirrE. /. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 747, modified 
from the older name butyrite, and AfOo?. An oxygenated hydrocarbon, 
of butter-like consistence. 

BUTYKITB. E. F, Qloeker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 9 (Butyrit), f. 
butynim, ' butter,' alluding to its appearance. A syn. of butyrellite. 

BYERTTB. J. W. Mallet, 1874, Rocky Mt. News, Nov. 19, in honor 



BT8SOUTB 48 OALAMINB 

of W. N. Byers. A Yar. of miDeral coal from Middle Park, Colo., 
much resembling albertite. 

BT880LITB. H, B. de Sawiure, 1796, Saus. Alp., § 1696, f. 
flvo'O'oi, ' flax.' and AiOo^. An olive-green, fibrous var. of amphibole, 
included under asbestos. 

BTTOWNTTB. T, Thomaon, 1835, A. J. 8., xxviii, 189, f. Bytown, 
Canada, its locality. A greenish-white feldspar, shown by optical 
examination to be a mixture. 

OABRBRTTB. /. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 561, f. Sierra Cabrera, 
Spain, its locality. Hydrous arsenate of nickel, cobalt and magnesium, 
found in apple-green crystals and fibrous masses. 

OAOHEUTATTXI. Adam, 1869. Adam Tab., 52, f. the Ca- 

cheuta mine. Chili, its locality. A doubtful var. of clausthalite. con- 
taining silver, probably a mixture. 

OAOHOLONG. Commonly derived from the Tartar word Easch- 
tschilon. 'beautiful stone.' A var. of opal, containing a little alumina. 

OAOOOHIiORB. Variant of kakachlore. 

OAOOOIiASTTB. H. C. Lewis. 1884, L. Hour., Feb., p. 2, f. KdKoi, 
* bad,' and KXdv, * to cleave,' referring to its poor cleavage. A mixture 
of calcitc and other minerals, resulting from the alteration of scapolite. 

OAOOXENTTB. /. SUinmann [1825. BOh. Qes. Abh.], 1826. 
Leon. Orykt., 749 (Eakoxen), f. KcxKoi and ^^vo?, * a bad guest,' because 
it injures the quality of the iron made from ore in which it is found. A 
hydrous phosphate of iron and aluminum, occurring in radiated tufts of a 
yellow color. 

CADMIUM BIiBNDB. A popular name for greenockite. 

OADMIUM OOHRE. Greenockite, the sulphide of cadmium, has 
eometimes been erroneously so called. 

02SNITB. See cenite. 

OAILLITE. 8, Meunier, 1898, Meun. Fers Met., 51, f. Caille, Prov. 
of Yar. France, where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 

OAINITE. YaHant of kainite. 

0AIN08ITB. Yariaut of cenosite. 

OAmNOORM STONE. An old name for quartz, cut as a gem, of 
a smoky, yellow or brown color, f. its locality. Cairngorm, Scotland. 

OAJUEUTE. J. O. Lem, 1801, Gall. Ilec, 269 (Cajudlite), f. 
Cajuelo. Spain, its locality. An obs. syn. of rutile. 

OAULTTE. O. Fischer v. WaWieim, 1806, Soc. Nat. Mosc. Bull., i, 
140, f. Callais, a name used by Pliny. An obs. syn. of turquoise. 

OAIjAMTNB. a Latin corruption of KaSuia, the old name of zinc 
ores in general. Restricted to the hydrous silicate of zinc by F. 8. Beudant, 



OAZJLMZTB 44 OALOOB 

1889, Beud. Min., tt, IIK). This is the etrliest uie and should have been 
given the preference, but common usage in England applies the name 
calamine to the carbonate of zinc, causing much confusion. 

OAI.ABCITB. A. O, Werner, 1816, Tasch. Min., z, 169 (Kalamit), 
f . calamus, ' a reed,' aUuding to the shape of its crystals. An obs. syn. 
of tremolite. 

OALAVBRITB. F. A. Oenlh, 1868, A. J. 8., 2d, xliz, 814, f. 
Calaveras Co., Cal.,.its locality. Telluride of gold of a yellowish color 
and metallic lustre. 

OALOARSOBARTTB. T, Thameon, 1886, Thom. Mhi.. i, 106, f. 
its composition. An impure var. of barite, containing some calcium. 

OALOAREOUS SPAR. An early name for calcite. 

OALOAREOUS SINTBR. A syn. of calcareous tufa. 

OALOAREOUS TUFA. Carbonate of lime, deposited from springs^ 
often taking the form of leaves, twigs and moss. 

OALO SPAR. A contraction of calcareous spar. 

OALO TUFA. A contraction of calcareous tufa. 

OALOEDONTTB. Error for caledonite. 

OAIjOEDONY. Variant of chalcedony. 

OALOHOIilTE. Error for chalcolite. 

OALOIFERRITE. Variant of calcoferrite. 

OALOIMANaiTE. C. U. Sfiepard, 1865, A. J. S., 2d, zxxiz, 176, 
f. its composition. An obs. syn. of spartaite. 

OALOINTTRE. /. /. K Huot, 1841, Huot Min., ii, 430, f. its com- 
position. A syu. of uitrocalcite. 

OALOIOOEIiESTITE. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 620, f. iU 
composition. A var. of celestite containing sulphate of calcium. 

OALOIOFERRITE. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Miu., 678, f. Calco- 
ferrite. J. R. Blum, 1858, Jahrb. Min., 287 (Calcoferrit), alluding to its 
composition. Hydrous phosphate of calcium and iron, found in clay in 
yellowish nodules. 

CALOIOSTRONTIANITE. A, Cathrein, 1888, Zeit. Eryst., ziv, 
866 (Calciostrontianit), f. its composition. A syn. of emmonite. 

OAIXntOTHORTTE. W, 0. Brogger, 1887, Geol. F5r. F6rh., ix, 249, 
1 its composition. A hydrous silicate of calcium and thorium. 

OAIXntOVOLBORTHITE. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 88 (Calc- 

Tolborthite), f. its composition. Vanadate of copper and calcium, con- 
taining more lime and less water than volborthite. 

OAIiOITB. /. K. Freieeleben, 1886, Mag. Orykt., vii. 118 (Calcit), f. 
calx, calds, ' burnt lime.' The name was applied at first to crystals of 
calcium carbonate, paeudomorphous after celestite, from Sangerhauaen. 



CALOOFBRRITB 45 OALTFTOX«rrB 

Afterwards applied to the common mineral that now bears its name, per- 
haps first by B. J, Chapman, 1848, Chap. Min., 22. Rhombohedral 
carbonate of calcium, in various forms and colors. 

OALOOFBRRITI). See calcioferrite. 

OAIX^O-BSALAOHITB. J. K, L, Zineken, 1842, Berg. HQt., i, 897 

<Kalk-Malachit), f. its composition. An impure malachite, containing 

oaldte and gypsum. 

OALOOURANTTB. A. BreUhaupt, 1865| Berg. HQt., xziv, 802 
<Calcouranit), f. its composition. A syn. of autunite. 

OALOOVOLBORTHITE. See calciovolborthite. 

OALOOZINOmi. 0, U. Shepard, 1876. Shep. Cont. Min., 2, f. its 
composition. A mixture of calcite and zincite. 

OAIiDERTTB. H. Piddingion, 1850, Sec. Beng. Jour., xix, 145, in 
honor of James Calder, an early writer on Indian geology. A massive 
Tar. of garnet. 

OAUBDOMTTE. F, 8. Beudant, 1882, Beud. Min.. ii. 867, f. Gale- 
donia, because found in Scotland. Sulpho-carbonate of lead and copper, 
occurring in minute, green crystals. 

OAZjK. Variant of cawk. 

OAIXAINITB. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min.. 572, f. callaina. a 
name used by Pliny. A green mioenil from a Celtic grave, having the 
composition of varisclte. 

OALIiAIS. Pliny, 77. Pliny Hist., Bk. 87, 151. A precious stone 
of a greenish-blue color, probably turquoise. 

OALLAITB. Variant of calaite. 

OAIXOOHROME. /. F. L, Hausmann, 1818, Hausm. Min., 1086 
<Kallochrom), f. ko[X\o?, 'beauty,' and xP^M^c, * color.' alluding to its 
brilliant red color. An obs. syn. of crocoite. 

OALOMEL. The early nume of the salt chloride of mercury, applied 
to the mineral 

OALSTRONBARrm. C. V, Shepard, 1888, A. J. S.. xxxiv. 161, f. 
its composition. A mixture of barium sulphate with either carbonates 
or sulphates of strontium and calcium. 

OAIiVONIGRITE. H, Laspepres, 1876. Jour. Pk. Ch., 2d, xiii, 226 
(Calvonigrit), f. calvus, 'bald/ and niger, 'black,' thus Latinizing the 
name psilomelane. A var. of psilomelane. 

OALTPTOLIN. Variant of calyptolite. 

OALYPTOLITB. G, U. Shepard, 1851, Am. Assoc, iv, 316, f. 
KdXwtrSi, 'concealed,' because so long concealed from recognition by 
mineralogists, and X^oi, An altered zircon, occurring in minute, brown- 
ish or greenish crystals. 






sol 




























CARAOOUTB 47 OAROLATHINB 

(Csppelenit). in honor of D. Oappelen. A boro-silicate of yttrium and 
barium, found in small, brown crystals. 

OARACX)IJTB. M, Websky, 1886, Ak. Ber. Monats., 1045 (Cara- 
€oUt), f. Caracolas, Chili, its locality. Oxy chloride of lead and sulphate 
of sodium, found in small, colorless crystals. 

OARBOOBRINB. F, 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 354. because 
thought to be carbonate of cerium. Ad obs. syD. of lanthanite. 

OARBONTTE. 0. J, Heinrkh, 1875, £. M. Jour., xiz, 85, f. its 
composition, probably a local name. An obs. name for a supposed 
mineral coke. 

OARBONTTTRINB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 24, f . its com- 
position. A syn. of tengerite, the carbonate of yttrium. 

OARBUNCLB. An old name for various precious stones of a fiery- 
red color. Now applied only to garnet cut en caboelion. 

OARINTHINB. A. G. Werner, 1817, Wem. Letz., 27 (Karinthin), 
f. Carinthia, its locality. An obs. name for a var. of hornblende. 

OARINTHINITB. Variant of carinthine. 

OARINTHITE. H, J. Brooke, 1844, Alger Phil., 553, f. Carinthia, 
its locality. An obs. syn. of wulfenite. 

OARIiTONTTB. 8. Meunier, 1893, Mcun. Fers Met., 65, f. Carlton, 
Texas, where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 

OARBIBNITE. H. Hahn, 1865. Berg. Httt., xxiv, 86 (Carmenit), f. 
Carmen Isl., Gulf of California, its locality. An impure chalcocite. 

CARMINB 8PAB. F, v. Sandberger, 1850. Pogg. Ann., Ixxx. 391 
(Carminspath), f. its color. A syn. of carminite. 

OARMINITE. J, B. Dana, 1854. Dana Min., 410, f. carminspath, 
the earlier name. Arsenate of iron and lead, occurring in clusters of 
red, needle-shaped crystals. 

OARNALUTB. H, Bote, 1856, Pogg. Ann., xcviii, 161 (Carnallit), 
in honor of R. von Carnall. Native potassium and magnesium chloride. 

OARNAT. A. Breithaupi, 1841, Breit. Ilandb., ii, 859 (Karnat), f. 
caro, camis, ' flesh,' alluding to its color. A ferruginous var. of kaoli- 
site of a flesh-red color. 

OARNATITE. J. D, Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 344, f. F,.a, BeudanVs 
feldspath du Camate, 1882, Beud. Min., ii. 111, f. the Carnatic, its locality. 
A var. of labradorite. 

OARNBZjIAN. Popularly derived f. caro, camis, ' flesh,' in allusion 
to its color. Perhaps a variant of cornelian . A reddish var. of chalcedony. 

OAROLATHINB. F, Z. 8onnenschein, 1853, Zt. Geol., v, 223 (Ka- 
lolathin), in honor of the Prince von Earolath, of Silesia. A var. of 
allophane, containing organic matter. 



OAROZJNITB 48 OA8TELNAUDITB 

CAROIJNiTS. Error for cavolinite. 

OARPHOLTTB. A. O, Werner, 1817, Wem. Letz., 10 (Karpholtth). 
f. Kclp<poi, 'straw,' alluding to its color, and A.260S. Hydrous silicate 
of aluminum and manganese, occurring in radiated tufts of yellow crystals. 

OARPHOSIDERITE. A. Breithaupt, 1827, Jour. Ch. Ph., I. 814 
(Earphosiderit), f. Kocptpos, 'straw,' and ai8r/po%, 'iron/ Hydrous 
ferrous sulphate, occurring in straw-colored incrustations. 

OARPHOSTHjBITB. W. 8. «. Waltershausen, 1858, Walt. Yule, 
272 (Earphostilbit), f. Kapipoi, 'straw,' and stilbite, from its. appearance. 
A vur. of thomsonite from Iceland, occurring in straw-colored needles. 

CAHROLLITS. W. L. Fader, 1852, A. J. S. , 2d, xiii, 418, f . Carroll 
Co., Md., its locality. Sulphide of cobalt and copper, of a steel-gray 
color and metallic lustre. 

OARTINITE. a H, Lundstrdm, 1874, Geol. FOr. FOrh., ii. 178 
(Koryinit), f. Kopvi'voi, error for KdpiSi'vo^, 'nut brown,' alluding to Its 
color. Arsenate of calcium, manganese and lead, found in brown masses. 

OARTOOBRTTB. W, 0. Brogger, 1890, Zt. Kryst., xvi, 478 (Kary. 
ocerit), f . Ktipvov, ' a nut ' and cerium, because a cerium mineral of nut- 
brown color. A very complicated boro-silicate of cerium and other 
bases, found in tabular, rhombobedral crystals. 

CARTOPIIilTE. A. Bamberg, 1889, Geol. FOr. FOrh. . xi, 27 (Kari- 
opilit), f . Kotpvov, 'a nut', and mXoi, 'felt.' A hydrous silicate of 
manganese, occurring in nut-brown, botryoidal shapes, with a fibrous^ 
matted texture. 

OASOHOLONG. Variant of cacholong. 

CASSINITB. /. Lea, 1866, Acad. Nat. Sci. Proc., 110, after John 
Cassin, who first called attention to it. A var. of orthoclase containing 
barium. 

OASSITBRTTB. F. 8. Beudant, 1882, Beud. Min., ii, 618, f. 
Kaaan^poi, 'tin.' Native oxide of tin, commonly called tin-stone. 

OASSITEROTANTALITE. J. F. L ffausmann, 1847, Hausm. 
3Iiu., ii, 963 (Eassiterotantal), f. Kaaairdpo^, 'tin,* and tantalite. A 
var. of tantalite containing tin. 

OASTANITB. L. Darapsky, 1890, Jahrb. Min., ii, 267 (Castanit), f. 
Kccordva, 'chestnut,' in allusion to its color. Hydrous sulphate of 
iron, of a chestnut-brown color. 

OASTELLITE. A. Breithaupi, 1866. Berg. HQt.. xxv, 118 (Castel- 
lit), after Herr Bergverwalter Casielli, its discoverer. A mineral much 
like titanite, occurring in very small, thin, tabular crystals. 

CASTELNAUDITE. A, Damour, 1858, L'Inst., 78, in honor of 
Francis, Count Castelnau. A phosphate of yttrium, near xenotime. 



OABTILXalTB 49 OBaAMITB 

OASTZZiIiXTB. (7. F. RamfnelOferg, 1866, Zt. Geol., zviii, 218 
(Castillit)/ after Prof. A. de Castillo, from whom it was obtained. Sul- 
phide of copper, zinc and other metals, resembling bornite. 

OA8TOR. See castorite. 

OASTORTTB. A, Brelthaupt, 1846, Fogg. Ann., Ixiz, 486 (Eastor), 
after Castor, an associated mineral being named Pollux, because the two 
occur together and resemble each other. A var. of petalite in transparent 
crystals. 

OASWBIilJTB. A, H, Chester, 1804, N. Y. Acad. Trans., xiii. 49, 
in honor of John H. Caswell of New York. An altered biotite from 
Franklin Furnace, N. J., resembling clintonite, and containing much 
manganese. 

OATAPUanTB. P. a Wethye and A, l^dgren, 1850, Pogg. Ann., 
Ixxix, 299 (Eatapleiit), f. Kard, * with,* and itXeioay, 'more,' referring to 
its occurrence with other rare minerals. A hydrous silicate of zirconium 
and sodium. 

OATARXNTTB. 8. Meunier, 1898, Meun. Fers Met., 7, f. St 
Catherine, Brazil, where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 

OATASPnJTB. L. J. Igelstrdm, 1847, Yet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., 14 
(Eastaspilit), f. KaraaTtlXal^ety, 'to spot,' in allusion to its mode of 
occurrence. Silicate of aluminum, potassium and other bases, found 

* 

in small pseudomorphous crystals, distributed in a chlorite rock. 

OAT OOU>. An early popular name for gold-colored mica. 

OATHKINITB. /. J. DobbU [1888, Geol. Soc. Glas. Trans., vii. 166], 
1888, Min. Mag., v, 181, f. the Cathkin Hills, Scotland, ito locality. A 
syn. of saponite. 

OATLXNTTB. C. T, Jackson, 1839. A. J. S.. xxxv, 888, after Geo. 
Catlin, on account of his association with the American Indians. A 
kind of red clay considered sacred by the Indians and used in making their 
pipes. 

OAT'S BTB. Chrysoberyl, or quartz with fine parallel threads of 
asbestos, cut en cabachon, and resembling the pupil of a cat's eye. 

OAT SUiVER. An early name for silver-colored mica. 

OAUK. Yariant of cawk. 

OAVOUMITB. T, MoniieeUi and N. Chvelli, 1825, Mont. Cov., 421, 
in honor of Ph. Cavolini. A var. of nephelite with silky lustre. 

OAWK. A miners' name for earthy barite. 

OEGABCITB. A. Breiihaupt, 1875, Weis. Syn., 86 (used byBreit- 
haupt in his lectures before 1857, according to a priv. com. from A. Weis- 
bach, Oct. 2, 1894) (Cegamit), f . Cegama, Spain, near which place it was 
found. A syn. of bydrozincite. 



OBLADOMTTE 50 OBRBOXJTE 

OBLADONTTB. JBT. F. Qloeker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 198 (Seladonit), 
f. its color. A hydrous silicate of iron and potassium of a celadon- 
green color. 

OELBSTIAUTE. J. L. Smith, 1875. C. R., Ixxxi. 1055, f. celestial, 
alluding to its mode of occurrence. A sulpho-hydrocarbon, found in 
certain meteorites. 

CEIjBSTINB. See celestite. 

OEIiBSTITE. A. O. Werner, 1709, Emm. Min., i, 188 (Coelestin), 
f. coelestis, * heavenly/ because the first specimens noticed were of a 
'* himmelblauer Farbe,*' ' heavenly-blue color.' Sulphate of strontium, 
occurring in bluish or white prismatic crystals. 

OEIiBSTOBARITE. J, D, Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 617, f. its com- 
position. Barite containing much sulphate of strontium. 

CELLULAR PTRITES. Marcasite, when in cellular aggregations. 

OENTTB. E. 8. Dana, 1892, Dana Min., 1109 (index). Variant 
of kainite. Also written coenite. 

OBNOSITB. A. B. Nordenskiold, 1886, Geol. FOr. FOrh., viii, 148 
(Eainosit), f. Kaivo^, 'novel,' alluding to its composition. A silicate of 
yttrium and calcium, containing some carbon dioxide, its true constitution 
not yet determined. 

OENTRALLA8ITB. H. How, 1859, Ed. Phil. Jour., x, 84,. probably 
f. K^vTpov, 'centre,' and aXXaaaeiv, * to change,* from its occupying a 
central place between two other minerals. Hydrous silicate of calcium, 
found in whitish fibres. 

OERAMOHALTTB. E. F. Oloeker, 1889. Glock. Min., 689 (Eeramo- 
halit), f. K^fjdMo?, 'clay,' and aXi, 'salt,' alluding to its mode of forma- 
tion. A syn. of aluuogen. 

OERARGTRITB. F 8, Bevdani, 1882, Beud. Min., ii, 501 (Eeiar- 
gyre), f. Kepa<;, 'horn,' and apyvpoi, 'silver.' Native chloride of 
silver, often called horn silver from its appearance. 

OERASINE. Variant of cerasite. 

CERASITE. See kerasite. 

OERA8TITB. Error for cerasite. 

OERAUNITE. From Kepixwoi, 'a thunderbolt.' An early 
name for meteoric stones or iron. Also for prehistoric flint implements, 
popularly called thunderbolts. In this sense used as an obs. sya, of jade 
or nephrite. 

OERBOLTTB. 0. Pdpp, 1870, Ann. Pharm. Supp., viii, 1 (Cerbolit), 
f. Mt. Cerboli, Tuscany, where there are boric acid works. A syn. of 
boussingaultite. 

CERBOLITB. B. de Dree, 1811, Dree Cat., 17, f. tctfpoi, 'wax/ 



61 

alladiDg to its appearance, and AtBo^. Described as a mineral looking 
like wax, and often mistaken for steatite. Not now identified; perhaps 
cerolite. 

OBRERTTB. if. K Klaproth, 1807, Elap. Beit., It, 140 (Cererit). 
A variant of cerite, of which it is an obs. sjn. 

OERHOBAXUTE. W, G. Brdgger, 1890, Zt. Kryst., xvi, 497 (Cer- 
homilit), f. cerium and homilite, because it is a var. of homilite, containing 
cerium salts. 

OBRINS. W. Hinnger, 1812, Jour, de Phys., Ixxy, 289 (Cerin), f. 
cerium. An obs. syn. of allanite. 

OBRENITE. K Hoto, 1859, £d. Phil. Jour., 2d, x, 84, f. tcyptroS, 
' waxy.' alluding to its appearance. An amorphous silicate of aluminum 
from Nova Scotia. 

OERTTB. W, Hinnger and /. J. Berselius, 1804, All. Jour. Chem., 
ii, 897 (Cerit), f. *cerium. Hydrous silicate of the cerium metals, oc- 
curring generally in brownish masses. 

Also a variant of cerine. 

OBROUTE. A, Breit/iaupi, 1828, Breit. Char., 145 (Eerolith), f. 
KTfftoi, 'wax,' and XiBo^. A hydrous silicate of magnesium, wax-like 
in appearance. 

OERUSITB. Variant of cerussite. 

OERUSSITB. TT. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 508 (Cerussit), f. 
cerossa, 'white lead.' Adapted from the old name of the artificial com- 
pound, in use for the native mineral long before. Carbonate of lead, 
found in orthorhombic crystals of various tints, and massive. 

OBRVANTITB. /. D, Dana, 1854, Dana Min., 141, f. Cervantes, 
Spain, its locality. Native antimony ochre, of a yellow or yellowish- 
white color. 

OBTLANITE. Variant of ceylonite. 

OETLONTTB. J. C. Delametherie, 1798, Jour, de Phys., xlii, 23 
(Ceylanite), f. Ceylan (Ceylon), its locality. A dark-colored var. of 
spinel. 

OBTSSATITE. F. Oonnard, 1876, Min. du Dept. du Puy-de-D6me, 
14, f. Ceyssat, France, its locality. A var. of tripolite, earlier called 
randannite. 

Variant of chabazie. 
See chabazite. 
BoBc d! Antic, 1788, Jour. d'Hist., ii, 181 (Chabazie), 



f. xf^fl^io^t the name of a stone mentioned in the Orphic poems, the 
word being changed to ;ta^aCtoS in later editions. A hydrous silicate 
of calcium and aluminum, found in white to flesh- red crystals. 



OHAZXIANTHITB. F. v. KobeU, 1858, Kob. Taf., 81 (Chalkantbit), 
f. chalcaothum, its old name. Natiye lulphate of o^per, or blae- 
vitrioL 

OHAIX^BDOMITB. Q. F. Becker, 1888, U. S. Geol. Sorr. Hon., 
18. 890. The chalcedony which occun in spherulites* so called to dia- 
tingiiiah it from the ordinary form. 

OHAIiOBDONT. DeriTation Teiy doubtful; perhaps f. x<'^^^^^» 
the name of one of the precious stones mentioned in the Revelations. A 
semi-precious stone, one of the varieties of quartz. 

OHAIjOBDONTX. From chalcedony and onyx. A banded ru^ 
of agate. 

OHAIXnuITB. W. P. Blake, 1888, A. J. 8., 8d, zxr. 197, modi- 
fied f . chalchihuitl, the native name of the stone. A name given to the- 
turquoise of New Mexico. 

OHAIaOiTB. From ;t^A/co$, 'copper.' An obs. name for a 
vitriolic mineral resulting from the disintegration of iron and copper 
pyrites. 

OHAI.OOOHLORB. K. Q. Fiedler (prohahly). 1845. Haid. Handb., 
652 (Chalkochlor), f. ;taAKo'(, * copper,' and chlor, 'chlorine,' alluding to- 
its composition. A var. of goethite, colored with chloride of copper, 
the result of the alteration of chalcopyrite. 

OHAIjOOOITB. /. 2>. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 52. f. Chalcosine, of 
F. S, Beudant, the earlier name. Sulphide of copper, occurring ii^ 
blackish-gray cr>'stals and masses. 

CHAIiOODITB. a U. Shepard, 1851. Am. Assoc, vi, 282, f. 
XctXKoi, ' brass,' or ' bronze,' in allusiGn to its lustre. A var. of st&pno- 
melane, found in velvety coatings with submetallic lustre. 

OHALOOUTB. A. G. Wtrner, 1788, Berg. Jour., ii, 508 (Chalko- 
lith), f. jt^^^^'^t 'copper,' and AiOoS, because it was thought to be a 
copper ore. An obs. syn. of torbernite. 

OHALOOMBNTTE. A. Dee Claktaux and A, Danumr, 1881, Bull. 
Soc. Miu.. iv, 51, f. jtaAK-o?, 'copper,' and ujfyff (^or ^^^4^v)* * the moon.'' 
A selenite of copper, found in bright blue crystals. 

OHALOOBaOUTE. C. W. BUmetrand, 1870, Yet Ak. Stock. 
Oefv., xxvii, 26. f. ;t^AiCof. * copper,' and mikla, ' much,' because it con- 
tains much more copper than chalcopyrite. A syn. of bomite. 

OHALOOMORPHm:. G, v, Bath, 1874, Pogg. Ann. En. Bd.» 
vi. 373 (Chalkomorphit), f. calx, Mime,' and uopiff?}, 'form,' which indi- 
cates that the mineral is formed from calcite inclusions in lava. (The first 
h in this name is an error; it should be calcomorphite). A hydroaa 
silicate of lime, found in hexagonal crystals. 



OHAIiCX>PHAOITB 68 OHALTFITB 

OHALOOPHAOITE. S. F, Qloeker, 1881. Glock. Min., 859 (ChaU 
cophacit), f. x<^^*^^^$ 'copper/ and {pdicos, 'a lentil/ alluding to the 
shape of its crystals. An obs. syn. of liroconite. 

OHALOOPHANTTB. O. E. Moore, 1875. Am. Chem.. vi. 1. f. 
XaXicoi, 'copper.' and ^aivca^ai, 'to appear/ alluding to its change of 
color when heated. Hydrous oxide of zinc and manganese, found in 
minute black crystals, which change to a bronze color when heated. 

OHALOOPHYLUTE. A, Breithaupt, 1841. Breit. Handb.. ii. 149 
(Chalkophyllit), f. x<^^^oi, 'copper/ and 0i5A.Aov, 'a leaf,* alluding to 
its structure. A foliated arsenate of copper, of a green color. 

OHALOOPTRXTB. J. F, Henckel, 1725, Henck. Pyr.. 428 (Chalco- 
pyrites), f. jt^Ax-Jj, ' copper,' and pyrites. Sulphide of iron and copper^ 
of a brass-yellow color, commonly called copper pyrites. 

OHAI.OOPHTRRHOTITE. C. W. Blonutrand, 1870. Yet. Ak. 
Stock. Oefv., xxYli, 23 (Chaikopyrrhotit), f. xocXKdi, 'copper,' and pyrrho- 
tite . A sulphide of iron and copper, resembling pjrrrhotite in appearance. 

OHALOOSIDERITB. 7. C, Vllmann, 1814, Ullm. Tab., 82a 
(Chalkofiiderit). f. x^^^^oi, 'copper,' and aiSrjfioi, 'iron.' from Its compo- 
sition. A liydrous phosphate of copper and iron. 

OHALOOSINB. J^. 8. Beudant, 1882, Beud. Min.. ii, 408. The 
first form of chalcoclte. 

OHAIiCX>STAKTITB. E. F. Oloeker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 17a 
(Chalkostaktit). f. x<f^*^o^» 'copper,' and oraK-rds, 'trickling,' referring 
to its appearance. An obs. syn. of chrysocolla. 

OHAI.OOSTIBITB. E. F, Oloeker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 82 (Chalko- 
stibit), f. x^^*f<^^f 'copper,' and stibium. Sulph-autimonide of copper, 
found in small tabular prisms of a lead-gray color. 

OHALOOTRIOHTTE. E. F Oloeker, 1881, Glock. Min.. 537 
(Chalkotrichit), f. jt^Ax-c/?, 'copper,' and Bpi^, rpixo?, 'hair.' Cuprite, 
occurring in capillary crystals. 

OHAUUTB. T. ThofMon [1831, Bryce Tab.], 1883, Phil. Mag., 
8d. iii, 35, f. x<i^^* ' a flint,' which it decidedly resembles, and XiBoi, 
An impure var. of thomsonite. 

OHALK. An old name, probably f. calx, ' lime.' A soft earthy 
Tar. of calcite. 

OHALTBITB. E, F. Oloeker, 1847, Glock. Syn.. 241 (Chalybit), f. 
calybs, 'steel/ because the mineral contains iron and carbon. A syn. of 
siderite. 

OHALTFITB. 0. U. Shepard, 1867, A. J. S., 2d, xlviii, 28, f. 
XccXvif, 'steel.' alluding to its composition. A somewhat doubtful 
compound of iron and carbon, found in certain meteorites. 



OHABCASZTB 64 OHIA8TOZ«ZNB 

OHAMASZTB. YariaDt of kamacite. 

OHAMOISim. P, Berthier, 1820, Ann. des M., t, 898, f. Cham, 
oison. Switzerland, its locality. A hydrous silicate of iron, often occurr- 
ing in granular masses. 

OHANARAUTB. T, A, Readmn, 1867, Read. Ind., 8. probably an 
error for chanarcillite, as it came from near Chafiarcillo, Chili. A 83m. 
of forbesite. 

CHANAROILUTE. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 86. f. Chafiar- 
cillo, Chili, its locality. A silver-white arsen-antimonide of silver. 

OHATHAMINB. Variant of chathamite. 

OHATHAMTTE. C. U, Shepard, 1844, Shep. Min., 158, f. Chatham, 
-Conn., its locality. A var. of smaltite, containing much nickel. 

OHAZELUTE. K Nordemkidld, 1849. Nord. Atom. Ch. Min. 
Syst., 84 (Cbazellit), f. Chazelles, France, its locality. A name given to 
one of Bertbier's varieties of berthierite. 

OHSIiENTITE. Error for cheleutite. 

OHSLEUSmi. Error for cheleutite. 

OHELEUTITII. A, Breitfiaupi (from a label in his hand-writing), 
1883. McCay Inaug., 23 (Cheleutit). probably f. xv^^^^oi, 'netted,' in 
4illusion to its structure. A var. of smaltite, with a cubical cleavage. 

OHELMSFORDITB. J. F. and 8, L. Dana, 1818, Dana Bost., 44, 
f. Chelmsford, Mass., its locality. A var. of wemerite, found at the 
locality named. 

OHEMAWINTTB. B. J. HarnngUm, 1891, A. J. 8., 8d, xlii, 882, 
f. Chemahawin or Chemayln, the Indian name of a Hudson Bay post, near 
which it was found. A fossil resin closely related to amber. 

OHENEVIXmi. Adam, 1866, C. R. . Ixii, 690, after R. Chene- 

Tiz, who first examined it. A hydrous arsenate of copper and iron. 

OHENOOOPROUTE. J. D. Dana, 1887, Dana Min.. 216, f. 
Xn^* -^^» 'goose,' Konpoi, 'dung,* and X^oi, An impure iron sinter, 
from its appearance called goose<<lung ore. 

OHENOOOPSOUTE. Error for chenocoprolite. 

OHEROEINB. 0. U, Shepard, 1856, Rept. Cnnt. Mine. 14. f. Chero- 
kee, the name of the Indian tribe who formerly occupied the locality where 
it was found. A milk-white or pinkish var. of pyromorphite. 

OHESSTUni. H, /. Brooke and W, H, Miller, 1862, B. and M. 
Min., 594, f. Chessy, France, one of its localities, and Xi^o^, A syn. of 
azurite. 

OHBSTERIJTB. 71 F, Seal, 1850. Dana Min.. 678, f. Chester Co., 
Pa., its locality. A var. of ortboclase containing microcllne. 

OEOASTOLINE. Variant of chiastolite. 



OHIASTOUTB 55 OBLORASTROLTTZl 

OECEASTOUTB. D, L, (?. Kanten, 1800, Kant. Tab., 28 (Chiasto- 
lith), f. x''<^<^^^^* 'arranged crosswise/ alluding to the appearance of a 
transverse section, and XiBo%. A VHr. of andalusite. 

OHILDRBNITB. H. J, Brooke, 1823, Quar. Jour., zvi, 275, in 
honor of J. G. Children. Hydrous phosphate of iron, noanganese and 
aluminum, found in brilliant yellow or brown crystals. 

OHIUEirrB. A. Breiihaupt, 1840, Jour. Fk. Ch., xix, 108 (Chileit), 
f. Chili its locality. An obs. syn. of goethite. 

Also used by A, KenngoU, 1858, Kenng. Miu., 28 (Chileit). A dark 
brown vanadate of lead and copper. 

OHILBNTTB. J. D. Dana, 1808, Dana Min., 86, f. Chili, ito locality. 
A silver-white mineral containing bismuth and silver. 

OHUiTONTTB. B. Emmons, 1888, Geol. Surv. N. T., 251, in honor 
of Dr. G. Chilton. An obs. syn. of prehnite. 

OHIBflBORAZITB. E. D. Clarke, 1821, Ann. Phil., 2d, ii, 57, f. 
Mt. Chimborazo, its locality. An obs. syn. of aragonitc. 

CHINA EARTH. An old name for the porcelain clay of China. 

CHIOIilTE. R. nermann and /. Auerhaeh, 1846, Jour. Pk. Ch., 
xxxvii. 188 (Chiolith), f. x^^^* 'snow,' from its color, and XiXioi. A 
fluoride of aluminum and sodium, much like cryolite. 

OHIONTTB. Variant of cliiolite. 

OHIVIAIJTB. Error for chiviatite. 

OHIVIATITB. a F. BammeUberg, 1858, Pogg. Ann., Ixxxviii, 820 
(Chiviatit). f. Chiviato, Peru, its locality. Sulpbide of bismuth and lead, 
of a gray color and metallic lustre. 

OHLADNTTB. C, U, Sltepard, 1846. A. J. 8., 2d. ii, 381, after 
E. F. Chladni, an early student of meteoric phenomena. A var. of 
enstatite, occurring in meteorites; perhaps a mixture. 

OHIiOANTHITB. A, BreiViaupt, 1845, Pogg. Ann., Ixiv, 184 
(Chloanthit), f. x^oaviii^, 'budding,' that is, 'turning green/ alluding to 
a green coating which it often exhibits. A uickeliferous var. of smaltite. 

OHIiORALLUMINITB. A, Scacehi, 1878, Nap. Ac. Atti, vi, 43 
(Cloralluminio), f. its composition. A hydrous chloride of aluminum, 
found at Vesuvius after the eruption of 1872. 

OHIiORAPATTTB. C. F. BammeUberg, I860, Ramm. Miu. Ch., 85a 
(Cblorapatit), f. its composition. A var. of apatite in which chlorine 
replaces the fluorine. 

OHLORARaTRXTB. A, Weisbaeh, 1875, Weis. Syn., 37 (Chlor- 
•rgyrit), f. Chlor, 'chlorine,' and afiyvpo^, 'silver,' from its composition. 
A syn. of cerargyrite. 

OHLORASTROIJTB. C. T. Jaekeon and /. D, Whitney, 1848, Jour, 



56 

J^at. Hist., V, 488, f. x^o^poi» 'green/ aarpov. 'star,' and Ai6o$. A 
▼ar. of prehnite, occurring In rounded green pebbles, with a stellate 
structure. 

OHIiORTTB. A. O. Werner, 1789, Berg. Jour. , i, 876 (Chlorit), f . 
xXoopirt^, 'a green stone.' A green micaceous mineral, essentially 
hydrous silicate of magnesiimi. The name is now applied to a group, 
i-ather than to any single species. 

CHLORITB SPAR. K. O, Fiedler, 1882, Pogg. Ann., xxv, 829 
(Chloritspath), because it resembles chlorite. A syn. of chloritoid. 

OHLORTTOID. O. Boie, 1887, iios6 Reise, i, 252. So named on 
account of its resemblance to chlorite. A hydrous silicate of magnesium 
and iron, of a greenish or gray color. 

CBLORITOIDITE. Variant of chloritoid. 

OHLORMAGNESITE. Variant of chloromagnesite. 

OHLOROARSENIAN. L. J. Igelstrom, 1898, Geol. F5r. FOrh., zy, 
471, f. x^^poS, 'yellow-ish green,' and arsenicum, alluding to its color and 
composition. Arsenate of manganese, found in yellowish-green grains 
and crystals. 

OHLOROOALCITE. A. ScaccM, 1872, Nap. Ac. Rend., 210 (Cloro- 
calcite), f. its composition. A syu. of hydrophilitc. 

CHIiOROMAONESITE. A. Scacchi, 1873, Nap. Ac. Atti, vi, 48 
(Cloromagncsite), f. its composition. Native chloride of magnesium, 
from Vesuvius. 

OHLOROMELANE. A, BreithaupU 1828, Breit. Char., 88 (Chloro- 
melan). f. x^^po^* 'green,' and iui4Xdi, -dvoi, 'black,' alluding to its 
greenish-black color. A syn. of cronstcdtite. 

CHLOROMELANITE. A. Damour, 1865, C. R., Ixi, 864, f. 
;tA(»po5, 'green,' and neX&i, -dvoi, 'black,' in allusion to its color. A 
syn. of jadeite. 

OHLOROPAL. /. J. Bernhardt and R. Brandes, 1822. Jour. Ch. 
Ph., XXXV, 29, f . ;tA(»/oo5, * green,' and opal. A hydrous silicate of iron, 
green in color and opal-like. 

OHIjOROPHAOITE. Error for chlorophceite. 

OHLOROPHSTTE. /. MaccuUoch, 1819. West. Isls.. i. 504, f. 
xXoopoi, 'green,' and <paioi, 'dun.' A hydrous silicate of iron, of an 
olive-green color, changing to brown on exposure. 

OHIjOROPH2SNERITE. Variant of chlorophanerite. 

OHIiOROPHANE. T. de Orotthaus, 1794, Jour, de Phys., xiv, 898, 
f. jt^cwpo?. 'green,' and {paivea^at, ' to appear,' because it emits a green 
light when heated. A var. of fluorite. 

OHIiOROPHANERITE. (7. Jenzsch, 1855, Jahrb. Min., 798 (Ohio- 



Cnr OBRISTIANITB 

ropbanerit), f. jt^oopJc, 'green/ and <pair€<rBat, 'to appear.' A var. 
of glauconite or green earth. 

OHLOROPHANXSSITE. Error for chlorophanerite. 

OHLOROPHTUJTB. C. T. Jackwa, 1841, A. J. S., xli, 868, f. 
;tA.09pd^, 'green/ and (p^XkoVt *a leaf.' A green, foliated var. of 
fahlunite. 

0HIX>R08PINBL. Q. Ease, 1840, Pogg. Ann., i, 652 (Chloro- 
spinell), f. jt^QopJs* 'green,' and spinel. A grass-green var. of spiuel. 

OHIX>ROTHZONrrX!. A. Bcaecfd, 1878, Nap. Ac. Rend., 167 (Clo^ 
rotionite), f. cloro, 'chlorine,' and BcTov, * sulphur,' alluding to its compo- 
flition. A doubtful mixture of chloride of copper and sulphate of 
I>otassium. 

OHLOROTHORITB. W. E, Hidden, 1889, N. Y. Acad. Trans., 
viil, 185, f. x^^po^t 'green,' and thorium, because it is a thorium mineral 
tbat turns green when heated. A syn. of thorogummite. 

OHIiOROniiB. A. Freneel, 1875, Min. Mitth.. 42, f. x^oopS?, 
'green,' and riXoi, *hair.' A hydrous arsenate of copper, occurring in 
capillary, green crystals. 

OHODNUFFrm. J. D. Dana, 1850, Dana Min., 284, after Prof. 
A. Chodneff, who first examiued it. A white or yellowish, double 
fluoride of sodium and alumiuum. 

OHODNBSSmi. Error for chodneffite. 

OHONDRARSENTTX!. L, J, IgeliUdm, 1865, Yet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., 
xxii, 8, because it looks like choudrodite and contains arsenic. A hydrous 
arsenate of manganese. 

OHONDRODITE. C. d'Ohsson, 1817, Vet. Ak. Stock. Hand., 206 
<Choudrodit), f. xoy^poi, 'a grain,' because of its mode of occurrence. 
A fluo-silicate of magnesium, of a yellow, brown or red color, often found in 
imbedded grains. 

0H0NDR08TIBIAN. L, J. JgeUtram, 1898, Zt. Eryst., xxii, 48. f. 
XorSpoi, 'a grain,* and stibium, because it is an antimony compound 
found in grains. Hydrous antimonate of manganese and iron. 

OHONIORTTB. F. v. Kobell, 1884, Jour. Pk. Cb. , ii, 51 (Chonikrit), f . 
Xooveia, 'fusion,' and Kpiroi, 'test,' it being distinguished from some other 
species by its fusibility. A hydrous silicate of aluminum and magnesium. 

OHBT8MATINB. See chrismatite. 

OHRISlffATXTB. E, F. Germar, 1849. Zt. Geol., i, 40 (Chrismudne), 
f. xp^<^MCt, 'ointment.' A butter-like hydrocarbon from Saxony. 

OHRISTIANmi. T. Monticelli and N, GoveUi, 1825, Mont. Gov.. 
428 (Cristianite), in honor of Prince Christian Frederick of Denmark. A 
▼ar. of anorthite fix>m Vesuvius. (m^ tner.) 



OHRISTOBAUTB 68 OHRTSOPAIr 

Also used by A, Des CUnuaux, 1847, Ann. des M., 4tb, zil, 878, in 
honor of Christian Yin, of Denmark. A syn. of phillipsite. 

OHRISTOBAIjITEI. Error for crislobalite. 

OHRISTOPHTTEI. A. Breitkaupt, 1862, Berg. HQt.. zxii, 27 
(Christopbil), f . St. Christoph, Saxouy, iU locality. A var. of sphalerite, 
containing much iron. 

OHROMOHI.ORITEI. R. Hermann, 1851, Jour. Pk. Ch., liii, 21 
(Cbromocblorit), because it is a member of the cblorite group containing 
chromium. An obs. syn. of kftmmereiite. 

OHROMB OOHRS. J. F. L. Hau^mann, 1813, Haus. Handb., 829^ 
(Chromocher), f. its composition. A clay-like mineral, containing oxide 
of chromium, which colors it a deep green. 

OHROMIO IRON. An early name for chromite. 

OHROMTTB. W. Haidinger, 1845. Haid. Handb., 550 (Chromit). 
Oxide of chromium and iron, in black crystals or massive. 

OHROMOOHIiORITXI. Variant of chromcblorite. 

CHROMOFBRRITE. E. J, Cliapman, 1848, Chap. Mm., 142, f. itfr 
composition. An obs. syn. of chromite. 

amiOMOWUIiFXINITEI. A. Schrauf, 1871, E. Ak. Wien, Ixiii 
(1), 184 (Cbromowulfenit), f . its composition. A red var. of wulfenite, 
containing some chromium. 

CHROMFICOTrrB. T. Petersen, 1869, Jour. Pk. Ch.. cvi, 187 
(Chrompicotit), f. its resemblance to picotitc. A var. of chromite from 
New Zealand. 

CHRT8ITIN. A, WeisbacK 1875, Weis. Syn., 54, f. xpv<rirrf%, 
* gold-colored,' in allusion to its golden-yellow color. A syn. of massicot. 

CHRTSOBBRTL. From XP^^o^i, *gold,' and fff^/jvXXoi, 'beryl.' 
Used as the name of golden -colored beryl by ancient mineralogists. Now 
used for a yellowish-green gem, an aluminate of glucinum. 

CHRTSOOOLIiA. From ^pOcroS, 'gold,' and KoWa, * glue.' A 
name given by the ancients to a mineral or minerals used for soldering 
gold. Later applied to borax and malachite; now confined to a green 
hydrous silicate of copper. 

CHRTSOOOLIilTB. Variant of chrysocoUa. 

CHRTSOLITB. From ;rpi)c7o?, 'gold,' and AiOo?. A name for- 
merly applied to several yellow or greenish gems, now confined to a silicate 
of magnesium and iron, called also olivine. 

CHRTSOPAL. J. a Delametherie, 1795, Delam. T. T., iii. 462 
(Chrysopale), f. XP^<^^^* 'gold,* and opal, alluding to its color and opal- 
escence. An obs. syn. of chrysoberyl. 

Chrysopal has also been used as the trade name for opalescent chrysolite* 



59 OTTRINE 

OHRTSOPHAN. A. Breit/iaupt, 18^2. Breit. Chnr., 92, f. xp^-^o- 
tpdr/fi, ' looking like gold.* An obs. syu. of clintonitc. 

OHRTSOPRASB. From ^/juctJs, *gold,' and npdaoi\ *a leek,' 
Formerly used for a yellowish-green gem, perhaps beryl; now applied to 
apple-green chalcedony. 

CHRTSOPRASB BARTH. M. K Klaproih, 1788, Ges. Nat. Berl. 
Schrift., viii, 17 (Chrysopraserde), f. its resemblance to chrysoprase. An 
obs. name for pimelite. 

OHRTSOTUiE. F. v. Kobell, 1834, Jour. Pk. Ch., ii, 297, f. xpi<ro^f 
'gold,' and r/A.o5, 'fibre.' A fibrous var. of serpentine often with a 
metallic lustre. 

OHRTSTOPHITB. Variant of christophite. 

OHUROHILIJTZ]. A. Bufrenoy. ia56, Duf. Min., iii, 280. f. 
Churchill. Somersetshire, its locidity. An obs. syn. of mendipite. 

OHUROHITZ]. J. F. Williams, 1865, Chem. News, xii. 183, after 
Prof. A. II. Church, who first examined it. A hydrous phosphate of 
cerium. 

CHUSITZI. Zf. B, de Saumire, 1794, Jour, dc Phys., xlv, 340, f. 
X^o't?, *a melting,' because of its easy fusibility. An obs. name for a 
partly decomposed var. of chrysolite. 

OHnSSITB. Variant of chusite. 

OIANITB. Variant of cyanite. 

OIMOUTB. M. n. Klaproth, 1795, Klap. Beit., i. 291 (Cimolit). f. 
Cimolia, Pliny's name for a kind of clay. A hydrous silicate of alumi- 
num, of a clay-like appearance. 

CINNABAR. From Kiyyi^fSapii, the ancient name for the same 
mineral. A red sulphide of mercury; native vei million. 

OINNABARTTB. Variant of cinnabar. 

OINNAMITB. A little used variant of cinnamon stone, ascribed to 
Q' Poggi, 1814, Allan Min. Nomen., 21. 

CINNAMON STONE. A, O, Werner, 1804, Ludw. Min., ii, 209 
(Kanelslein), referring to its color. A cinnamon brown var. of garnet. 

OIPLYTE. J. Ortlier [1888, Soc. Geol. Nord. Ann., xvi, 270], 1890, 
Bull. Soc. Min., xiii, 160, f. Ciply, Belgium, its locality. An uncertain 
dlico- phosphate of calcium, found with phosphorite. 

OIROON. Variant of zircon. 

OIRROUTB. a W. Blomstrand, 1868, Dana Min., 579 (Kirrolith). 
f. Kippoi, *pale yellow,* and AtOoi, A yellow, hydrous phosphate of 
aluminum and iron. 

CITRINB. From Kirpov, ' the citron,' alluding to its color. A 
yellow var. of quartz often cut as a gem. 



OITRON 60 OLINOOIiASITB 

CITRON. Variant of citrine. 

OLARITB. F, V. Sandberger, 1874, Jahrb. Miu.. 960 (Clarit), f. the 
Clara mine. Scbapbach, Baden, its locality. A sulph-arsenide of copper, 
very similar to enargite. 

OIiAUDBTTTEI. J, D, Dana, 1868, Dana Min.. 796, after F. Claudet. 
who first examined it. Native arsenious acid, found in ortborhombic 
prisma. 

CliAUSSBNTTZ]. A, Dvfrenoy, 1845, Duf. Min., ii, 349. prob. after 
P. Claussen. An obs. syn. of hydrargillite. 

CLAUSTHAUTB. F. 8, Beudant, 1882, Beud. Min., ii, 581 (Claus. 
thalie), f. Claustbal, Harz. its locality. Selenide of lead, found in gran- 
ular masses of a lead-gray color. 

CLATTTB. W. J. Taylor, 1859. Acad. Nat. Sci.. 306. in honor of 
J. A. and J. R. Clay. An uncertain alteration product, composed of 
fiulphur, arsenic, antimony, lead and copper. 

OLBAVBLANDITB. H, J, Brooke, 1823, Ann. Pbil. . 2d, v, 381, in 
lienor of Prof. P. Cleaveland. A white lamellar var. of albite. 

OIiBIOPHANB. T, Nuttall, 1851 (T. H. Henry). Pliil. Mag., 4th, i, 
183, perhaps f. KXeio^ for icAeo?, 'fame,' and <patv€(TOat, *to appear,' but 
why so named is not clear. A colorless or white var. of sphalerite. 

OLBOPELANB. Variant of cleiophane. 

OLEVBITB. A, E. Nordemkidld, 1878, Geol. F5r. F5rh., iv, 28 
(Cleveit), in honor of Prof. P. T. Cleve. Hydrous oxide of uranium 
and lead, found in black, isometric crystals. 

OUFTONITB. R. P. Qreg and W. O. LetUojti, 1858, G. and L. 
Min., 443, f. Clifton, near Bristol Bug., its locality. An impure var. of 
celestite. 

Also used by L. FleUher, 1887, Miu. Mag., vii, 121, in honor of Prof. 
R. B. Clifton, of Oxford. A cubical form of graphite, found in meteoric 
iron. , 

OLINGMANITB. B. Silliman, Jr., 1849. A. J. S., 2d. viii. 880, 
after T. L. Cliugman, who first brought it to notice. An obs. syn. of 
margaritc. 

CLINOOHLORB. W, P. Blake, 1851, A. J. S., 2d, xii, 889. f. 
tcXiveiVf *to incline,' and ;tAfijpo5, 'green,' "in allusion to the great 
obliquity between the optical axes, and its green color." A syn. of 
ripidolite. 

OLINOOIiASITB. A. BreiUiaupt, 1830, Breit. Uib.. 8 (Elinoklas). 
f. KXi'veiv, 'to incline,' and KXav, 'to break,' in allusion to its oblique 
cleavage. Hydrous arsenate of copper, found in dark blue masses made 
up of minute crystals. 



OUNOOROOrm 61 oobaltidei 

OUNOOROOrrB. F, v, Sandberger, 1879, Slug. Inaug.. 9 (Clino- 
crocit), f. KXiyetVy 'to incline/ and KpoKoi, 'saffron/ alludiug to its 
crystalline form and color. An uncertain sulphate of aluminum, found 
in deep yellow, monoclinic crystals. 

OIiINOHEDRITEI. A, Breithaupi, 1866, Berg. HQt., xxv, 181 
(Cliuoedrit), f. KXivetv, 'to incline,' and edpa, 'a bace.' A kind of 
tetrabedrite, supposed to vary from its usual form. 

OLXNOHUBSITZ]. A. Des CUnzeaux, 1876, Jabrb. Min., 641, f. 
icXiyeiv, *to incline,' and bumite. A monoclinic species separated 
from bumite. 

OLINOPHiBrrZ]. F, V. Sandberger, 1879, Sing. Inaug., 16 (Clino- 
pbsit), f. KXiveiv, 'to incline,' and 0azo5, 'dusky.' A bydrous sul- 
pbate of iron, found in dark green or black, monoclinic crystals. 

OLINTONTTB. J. Finch, W. Hortoii and W. W, Mather, (1828, not 
published), 1831, A. J. S., xix, 159, in bonor of Gov. De Witt Clinton. 
Silicate of aluminum, maguesium and iron, found in reddisb-brown, crys- 
talline plates. 

OLOANTHITB. Variiiut of cbloantbite. 

OLOU8TONITB. M. F, Heddle, 1880, Min. Mag., iii, 222, after 
tbe Rev. Dr. Clouston, its discoverer. A var. of coal or bitumen from 
the Orkneys. 

OLUTHALITE. T, Thomson, 1836, Thom. Min., i, 339, f. Clulba, 
an old name for tbe Clyde valley, its locality, and XiOoi. A liesb-red 
var. of aiialcite. 

OOAHUUilTB. 8. Meunier, 1893, Meun. Fers Met., 21, f. Coabiiila, 
Mexico, where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 

COBALT BLOOM. From Eobold-Biatbe, tbe old German name 
for tbe mineral now generally called erytbrite. 

COBALT CRUST. From Koboldbescblag. An obs. name for 
earthy erytbrite. 

COBALT GLANCB. An old name for cobaltite, alluding to its 
brilliant metallic lustre. 

COBALT GRAPHITB. A. Breithaupt, 1820, Breit. Char.. 5 (Kobalt- 
graphit), so called because it will mark jxiper. An obs. syn. of asbolite. 

COBALT MICA. An obs. name for erytbrite. 

COBALT OCHRB. An early name for both asbolite and erytbrite. 

COBALT P7RITBS. A syn. of linnacite. 

COBALT VITRIOL. A chemical name formerly applied to tbe 
mineral bieberite. 

COBALTIDB. A. Leymerie, 1859, Ley. Min., ii, 354, f. cobalt. A 
syn. of asbolite. 



OOBALTINB 62 OOLORADOITB 

COBALTINE. See cobaltite. 

COBALTITB. F, 8, Beudant, 1882. Beud. Min., ii. 450 (Cobaltine), 
f. cobiiltum. A sulph-arsenide of cubalt, of a brilliant metallic lustre 
aud silver- white color. 

OOBALTOMENITB. K Bertrand, 1882, Bull. Soc. Miu., v, 90, f. 
cobalt, uud MV^^ (for aeXijrt/), *tbe moon.' in allusion to its compositioD. 
Selenite of cobult, of a rose color. 

COCCINITE. W. Hatdinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 572 (Coccinit). f. 
coccineus, ' scarlet.' A bright scarlet mineral from Mexico, supposed 
to be iodide of mercury. 

OOOOOLITE. B. J. dAndrada, 1799, Jour, de Phys.. xlix, 245 
(Coccolithe), f. kokko^, *a grain,' and Az'Oo?. Pyroxene of various 
colors, but always granular in form. 

COCEIiIS. An old popular name for any dark green or black elon- 
gated cr}'stals, often tourmaline, but sometimes hornblende. 

OOOONUOITB. J, J, N. Iluot, 1841, Huot Miu., ii, 462. f. Coco- 
nuco, U. S. Colombia, near which place it was found. A vnr. of calc- 
siuter, containing manganese carbonate. 

CGESLESTINE. See celestite. 

CGESRULEOLAOTITE. T. PeUrsen, 1871, Jahrb. Min., 853 (Cceru- 
Icolactin), f. cwruleus, 'blue/ and lac, lactis, 'milk,' in allusion to its 
color. Hydrous phosphate of aluminum, of a milk-white color passing 
into sky-blue. 

COCKSCOMB PYRITES. An early name for certain forms of 
marcasite, in allusion to their shapes. 

OOHENTTE. E. Weifischenk, 1889, Ann. Mus. Wien., iv, 94 (Cobenit), 
in honor of Dr. E. Cohen, of Greifswald. One of the iron alloys found 
in meteoric iron. 

COLEMANITE. J, T. Evans, 1884, Acad. Cal. Bull., i, 57, after 
"Wm. T. Coleman, owner of the mines where it was found. Hydrous 
borate of calcium, found in brilliant, colorless crystals. 

COLLOPHANITE. F. v. Saiulberger, 1870, Jahrb. Miu., 808 (Kollo- 
pban), f. KoXXa, 'glue,* and tpuirecrOai, 'to api>ear,* alluding to its 
appearance. Hydrous phosphate of calcium, resembling white opal, 

COLLYRITE. D. L. G. KursUn, 1800. Karst. Tab., 30 (Kollyrit), f. 
KoWvfJinr, a name for the Samian earth, which it resembles. A white, 
clay-like silicate of aluminum. 

COLOPHONITE. D. L. G. Karaten, 1806, Lucas Tab., 265 (Kolo- 
phonit), f. colophony, in allusion to its resinous lustre. A coarse granu- 
lar var. of garnet. 

OOLORADOITB. F. A. Genth, 1877, A J. S., 8d, xiv, 428. f. 



OOLUBffBZOONITB 08 OOOKBITB 

Colorado, its locality. Native telhiride of mercury, of a grayish color 
and metallic lustre. 

COLUMBIOONTTZ]. G. U. Shepard, 1870. Shep. Cat. Min., 3. A 
name with no other description than that it came from JVIiddletown and 
Haddam. Conn. 

COLUMBITEI. li. Jameson, 1805, Jam. Min., ii, 582, f. Columbia, 
the poetical name for America, where it was lii'st found. Columbate of 
iron, found in brilliant, black crystals. 

COM ARITEI. Error for couarite. 

COMPOUND SPAR. B. Kirwan, 1784, Kirw. Min., 83, perhaps 
because it contains carbonates of two metals. An obs. syn. of dolomite. 

OOMPTONITB. David Brewster, 1821, Ed. Phil. Jour., iv, 131. in 
honor of Earl Compton. A syn. of thomsonitc. 

OONARITJB. A. BreiiJiaupt, 1859, Berg. HUt., xviii, 1 (Kouarit). f. 
Kovapo^, for Kovyapui, * an evergreen,' alluding to its color. Hydrous 
silicate of nickel, found in green crystals and grains. E, 8. Dana spells it 
oounarite, 1892. Dana Min.. 681. 

OONDRODirB. Variant of chondrodite. 

OONDURRTTB. Wm, Phillips, 1827, Phil. Mag.. 2d, ii. 280, f. the 
Condurro mine, Cornwall, its locality. A soft, black var. of domeykite, 
the result of alteration. 

OONPOIiBNSITB. A. Dvfrenoy, 1856, Duf. Min., iii, 583, f. 
Oonfulens, France, its locality. A syn. of montmorillonite. 

OONIOHALOITB. A, Breithaupt and C. J. Fritzsehe, 1849, Pogg. 
Ann., Ixxvii, 189 (Konichalcit), f. Koria, 'lime,' and ;taAiCc>?, 'copper.* 
An emerald-green, hydrous phosi)hate of calcium and copper. 

OONISTONTTB. B. P. Greg, 1854. A J. S., 2d. xvii. 333, f. Coiiis- 
tou, Cumberland, its locality. Artificial oxalate of calcium, announced 
as a native mineral. 

OONTTB. A. J. Betzius, 1795, Retz. Miu., 136 (Couiles). f. Koria, 
Mime.' A var. of dolomite, containing much magnesium carbonate. 

Also used by J. Macculloch, 1819, West. Isl., i, 578. A powdery 
white mineral principal ly^ilica, found in the cavities of trap, with zeolites. 
He changed the name afterwards to koiiilite. 

OONNARITB. See couarite. 

CONNBIXTTB. J. D. Dana, I80O, Dana Min.. 523, after Arthur 
Connell, who first examined it. Chlorosulphate of ropper, occurring in 
acicular. green crystals. 

OOOKBITB. G, J, Brush, 1866. A. J. S.. 2d. xli, 240, in houor of 
Prof. J. P. Cooke. Hydrous silicate of aluminum and lithium, found 
in minute, pearly scales. 



OOOPERITB 64 OOQXTIBflBITB 

COOPERITE. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 7. Mentioned as a 

syn. of marmolite, but with no derivation or description. 

OOORONGITEI. Q. C. Morris, 1877, Acad. Nat. Sci. Proc. 181. f. 
the Coorong Dist., South Australia, where it was found. (Said to be its 
Ipcal name. ) A mineral caoutchouc. 

COPAIilNB. J, F, L. Haumann, 1847, Haus. Min., ii, 1500. 
Fossil gum copal. 

COPAIjITZ]. Variant of copaline. 

COPIAPrrB. H, Rose, 1833. Pogg. Ann., xxvii. 809 (Copiapit), f. 
Copiap6, Chili, its locality. A yellow, hydrous sulphate of iron. 

Also used as a syn. of fibroferrite. 

COPPER. Natural metallic copper, usually called native copper. 

COPPBR BLBNDB. A. BieiaiaHpU 1823, Breit. Char., 181 (Eup- 
ferblende). An obs. name for a var. of tennantite containing zinc. 

OOPPBR BMBRAIiD. R, Jameson, 1805, Jam. Min., ii, 241. 
A syn. of dioptase. 

OOPPBR FROTH. A. 0. Werner, 1816, Hoff. Mhi.. iii, 180 
(Eupferschaum), alluding to its appearance. A syn. of tyrolite. 

COPPBR OliANOB. An old name for chalcocJte, alluding to its 
lustre. 

COPPBR ORBBN. An old name for chrysocoUa. 

COPPER MIOA. D. L. O, Karsten, 1801, Hoff. Mag., i, 548 
(Eupferglimmer), alluding to its appearance. A syn. of chalcophyllite. 

COPPBR NICKEL. From Eupfernickel, the old name for niccol- 
ite, still often used. 

COPPBR PYRITES. From Eupferkies, the old name for chalco- 
pyrite. 

COPPBR X7RANITB. A syn. of torbemite. 

COPPBR VITRIOL. An early name for mineral sulphate of 
copper, later called chalcanthite. 

COPPERAS. Various sulphates of iron have been so called; now 
used as a group name. 

COPPERASINE. C. U, Shepard, 1859. Kept. Mt. Pisgah, 8, f. 
copperas, alluding to its composition. An uncertain decomposition 
product of chalcopyrite, containing both iron and copper sulphates. 

COPPERAS STONE. A popular name for pyrites, from which 
copperas is often made. 

COPPITB. B, Beehi [1863. Georgof. Att., 2d, x, 203], 1878, Min. 
Tosc., ii, 841, in honor of P. Coppi, proprietor of the Monte Catani mines. 
A syn. of tctrahedrite. 

COQUIMBITB. A, BreiViaupt, 1841, Breit. Handb., ii, 100 (Co- 



OORAOITXI 65 OOSSATTEI 

quimbit), f. Coquimbo, Cbili, its locality. Hydrous sulphate of iron, 
fouDcl in wbitisb or violet masses. 

CORAOrrB. J. L, Le Conie, 1847, A. J. 8.. 2d. iii, 117, probably 
f. Kopa^, * a raven/ alluding to its color. A jet-black var. of uraniuite. 

OORDIBRTTEI. J, A, U. Lucas, 1818, Lucas Tab., ii, 219. after 
P. L. Cordier. who had described it. A syn. of iolite. 

OOREITEI. Variant of koreite. 

OORINDON. Variant of corundum. 

CORIVBNDUM. An old form of the word corundum. 

OORKrra. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 49. f. Cork, Ireland, its 

locality. A syn. of beudautite. 

GORNBLIAN. The older form of carnelian. 

OORNBOL. Variant of cornelian. 

OORNBOUS LBAD. JD. L. O. Karsten, 1800, Earst. Tab., 78, f. 
Honiblei. An obs. syn. of phosgenite. 

OORNBOUS MBROURT. An early name for mineral calomel. 

OORNBOUS SILVBR. An early name for cerargyrite. 

OORNWALUTB. F, X M. Zippe [1846. BOh. Ges. Abh., 5th. iv], 
1849, Ramm. Min. Ch. Supp., iv, 122 (Cornwallit), f. Cornwall, Eng., its 
locality. A green, amorphous, hydrous arsenate of copper. 

OORONOUTTB. A. Baimondi, 1878, Min. Perou, 88, f. Corongo, 
Peru, its locality. Antimonate of lead and silver, of doubtful compo- 
sition. 

OORONTTB. T, 8, Runt, 1886, Hunt Phys., 850, f. corona, *a 
crown,' in allusion to its locality, Crown Pt., N. Y. Proposed as the 
name for the brown, magnesian var. of tourmaline. 

OORUNDBLUTE. B. SiUiman, Jr., 1849, A. J. S., 2d, viii. 888, 
f . corundum, with which it is associated, and Xi^oS, A syn. of margarite. 

OORUNDITB. Variant of corundum. 

OORUNDOPHIIJTB. 0. U, Shepard, 1851, Am. Assoc, iv, 818, f. 
corundum, and 0{Xo^, * friend,' because associated with corundum. An 
important member of the chlorite group, found in foliated, green crystals. 

OORUNDUM. From kurund, its Indian name. Oxide of alumi- 
num, in several varieties, including ruby, sapphire and the less pure emeiy. 

OORUNDUMITB. Variant of corundum. 

OORTNTTB. V. v. Zepharovich, 1865, K. Ak. Wien., li, 117 (Kory- 
nit), f. KopiSrTf, * a club,' in allusion to the shape of its crystals. Sulph- 
arsen-antimonide of nickel. 

008AUTB. F. A. Oenth, 1868, A. J. S., 2d, xlv, 819, f. Cosaia. 
Mexico, its locality. Sulphide of lead and bismuth. 

OOSSAITB. B, Ooitaldi, 1874. Tor. Ac, x, 189. after Prof. A. 



COSSTRTTEI 66 ORISPITEI 

Cossa, who first described it. A vtir. of pnragonite, lackiDg. the usual 
micaceous cleavage. 

COSSTRITE. //. Fctrstner, 1881, Zt. Kryst., v, 348 (Cossynt), f. 
Cossyra, the uucient unme of Pautellaria, its locality. A sflicute of irou, 
nliiminum aud sodium, uot fur from amphibole. 

OOTTAITB. A. BreWtavpt, 1866, Berg. Hat., xxv. 39 (Cottuit). in 
lioDor of Bergrath B. vou Coltn. A gniyisli-white feldspar from Carls- 
bad. Bohemia. 

OOTTBRTTB. R Ilarkness, 1878, Min. Mag., ii, 80, after Miss 
Colter, its discoverer. A vnr. of quartz, exhibiting a pearly lustre. 

COTTON-STONB. A popular uame for mesolite, alluding to its 
fibrous structuixj. 

OOTUNNITB. T, Monticelli and JV". CvveUi, 1825, Mont. Gov., 47 
(Colunnia^ in honor of Dr. D. Cotiiguo. Native chloride of lead. 

OOUPHOOHLORITB. A. Breithavpt, 1820, Breit. Char.. 11 (Ku- 
phochlorit), f. KoOipoS, 'light,' and ^Agj/jJs, 'green,' in allusion to its 
color. An obs. syn. of liroconile. 

COUPHOLITE. Variant of koupholite. 

OOUZERANITB. J. G. F. t. Chmpeutier, 1816. Tusch. Min.. x, 
(1), 303 (Couzeianit), f. Couserans, Fmnce, the old name of Ariege, its 
locality. A var. of dipyrc, the result of alteration. 

COVELLINE. F. S. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii. 409, after Prof. 
N. Covelli. ^vho discovered it. An indigo-blue sulphide of copi)er. 

COVELIilNITE. Variant of covellite, now obsolete. 

Also by an error used for cavolinite. 

COVELLITE. Variant of covelline, the more common form now. 

COVELLONITB. Variant of covelline. now obsolete. 

ORAIQTONITB. M. F Uaidle. 1882, Min. Mag., v. 30, f. Craigton, 
Scotland, its locality. An oxide of iron and manganese, found as a 
bluish -black coating on granite. 

CRATTONITB. See crichtonitc. 

ORAMERITE. T. IL Henry, 1851, Phil. Mag., 4th, i, 28. (No 
derivation given.) A syn. of cleiophane. 

CREDNERITE. C. F. liavimehherg, 1847, Fogg. Ann., Ixxii, 569 
(Crednerit), after Prof. C F. Credner, who fii-st noticed it. A black 
oxide of copper and man'rancse. 

ORIOHTONITE. J. L. Bonrnon [1813. Bourn. Cat.], 1814, Allan 
Min. Nomen., 54 (Craitonite). in honor of Dr. A. A Crichtou. One of 
the vars. of titaniferous iron. 

CRISPITB. J. C. IJeUimetherie, 1795, Delam. T. T., i, 402, f. 
Crispalt. Switzerland, its locality. An obs. syn. of ^*agenite. 



CRI8TZANITB 67 ORTOOONTTZl 

ORISTIANITB. Variant of christian] te. 

ORISTOBAUTB. Q, v. Hath, 1886. Nat. Ver. Bonn. Corr., xxxiv, 
121. f. St. Cristobal, Mexico, its locality. A spinel-like form of silica, 
not yet fully examined. 

ORISTO-aRAHAMITB. J. P. KimbaU, 1876. A. J. S., 3(1, xii, 
286. A var. of grahamite from the Cristo miue, Vera Cruz. Mexico. 

CROOAUTE. F. J. A. Estner, 1797. Est. Miu , ii, (3). 559 (Kroka- 
lith), f. KfjoKoS, 'saffron/ alluding to its color, and XiBoi. A red var. 
of natrolite, occurring in amygdules. 

CROOKAUTJB. Variant of croculite. 

CROOIDOLITB. J. F. L. llauamann, 1831, G5tt. Ges. Anz., 1585, 
f. KpoKiU, -v(5o5, 'a woof,' alluding to its fibrous structure, aud A/Oo?. 
A silicate of iron, occurring in bluish, fibrous masses, hence called blue 
asbestos. 

OROOOISB. F 8. Bevdant, 1883. Beud. Min., ii, 669. f. KpoKoS, 
'saffrou,' alluding to its color. Chromnte of lead, foutjd in orauge to 
red crystals. 

OROOOISITB. Variant of crocoise. 

CROOOITB. Varlaut of crocoise, now most often used. 

OROIOFORDITB. R P. Greg and W. G. Lettsom, 1858, G. L. 
Min.. 421, f. Cromford, Eug., its locality. A syn. of phosgeuite. 

ORONSTBDTITB. J, Sttinmann, 1831, Jour. Ch. Ph., xxxii. 69 
(Cronstedit). in honor of A. Cronstedt. A hydrous silicate of iron, 
found in small, brilliant, black crystals. 

OROOKBSITB. A. E. Nardenskiold, 1866. Soc. Chem., 2d, vii. 413, 
after Wm. Crookcs, who discovered thallium. Selenide of thallium 
and copper, found in brittle masses of a lead-gray color. 

Also used by //. Tamm, 1872, Chem. News, xxvl, 13. A syn. of 
tarn mite. 

CROSS STONB. J. Uill, 1771, Hill Foss., 152, f. lapis crucis, 
which he ascribes to /. G. Wallerius. A syn. of nndalusitc. 

CRUOILITB. R, D. Thomson, 1885, Kec. Gen. Sci., i, 142. f. 
eruz, -ucis, • a cross,' and A/Oo?. A syn. of crucite of T. Thoimon. 

ORUOITB. J. C. DelamHJierie, 1795, Delam. T. T., iii, 464. f. crux, 
-ucis, ' a cross.' An obs. syn. of andalusite. 

Also used by T. Thomson, 1886. Tliom. Min.. i. 435. A pseudo- 
morpb of iron hydrate after some mineral not now identified, perhai>8 
arscnopyrite, occurring in crossed groups, hence the name. 

CRTOOONTTB. A. E Nm-denskuM, 1871, Vet. Ak. Slock. Oefv., 
zzTiii, 293 (Kryokonit), f. tCfjvo?, 'ice,* and Koni, 'dust.' Dust found 
on the surface of the interior ice of Greenland, not a homogeneous mineral. 



ORTOLTTB 68 OX7BIOITB 

ORTOUTB. P. a Abildgaard, 1799, All. Jour. Chem.. ii, 50^ 
(Cliryolith), f. Kpvo?, *ice/ alluding to its appearauce, and XiBo^. Flu- 
oride of aluiniuuQi and sodium, geuemlly colorless aud ti-nushiccnt. 

CRTOPHTLIilTE. J. P. Cooke, 1867, A. J. S., 2d, xliii. 217, f. 
KpvoS, * ice,' aud <pvXXuy, *a leaf,' because it melts easily aud is foliated. 
A black micaceous mineml, a silicate of aluminum, iron aud otber bases. 

ORTPHIOLTTB. A, and E. Scacefii, 1884. Nap. Ac. Rend., 288 
(Crifiolite), f. Kfjv<pioi, * hidden,' and XiQo^. A supposed lluo-pbospbate 
of calcium and magnesium, occurring in minute ciystals enclosed in 
apatite. 

ORYPTOHAUTB. A. Seacehi, 1873. Nap. Ac. Atti. vi, 37 (Cripto- 
alite), f. KpvTiroS, * concealed,' aud aA$, 'salt,' alluding to its mode of 
occurrence. Fluo-silicate of ammonium from Vesuvius. 

ORYPTOUNB. See cryptoliiiite. 

ORYPTOLINTTB. J, D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min.. 762 (Cryptoline), 
f. KpvTtroS, 'concealed.' A fluid of unknown composition, found in 
the cavities of certain crystals. 

ORYPTOLTTB. Fr. Wohler, 1846. G5tt Ges. Anz.. 19 (Kryptolith), 
f. KpvitTo^, * concealed,' alluding to the minuteness of its crystals, and 
Xt^oi. A syn. of monazite. 

ORYPTOMORPHITB. ff. How, 1861. A. J. S.. 2d, xxxii, 9, f. 
KpvTCToi, 'concealed,' and uop<pt}, 'form.' because its crystalline struc- 
ture can only be seen under tbe microscope. Borate of calcium and 
sodium, fouud in white kernels. 

CRYSTAL. Ad early name, still somewhat used, for colorless^ 
transparent quartz. 

CUBAN. See cubanite. 

CUBANTTB. a, Breiihaupt, 1843, Pogg. Ann., lix, 825 (Cuban), f. 
Cuba, its locality. Sulphide of iron and copper. 

CUBB ORB. J. O. Letii, 1794. Lenz Min., ii. 18 (Wttrfelerz). f. 
the shape of its crystals. An obs. syn. of pliannacosiderite. 

CUBB SPAR. A, O, Werner, 1803, Ludw. Min., i, 51 (Wttrfel- 
spath), .in allusion to its cleavage in three directions. An obs. syn. of 

anhydrite. 

CUBIC QUARTZ. O. 8. 0. Lasius, 1787, Chem. Ann.. W, 383 
(Eubische Quartz Eristalle), alluding to its shape and hardness. The 
earliest name, now obs., for boracite. 

CUBIC SIBOLITB. L. A. Emmerling, 1793, Emm. Min.. i, 205 
(WUrfelzeolith), alluding to the shape of its crystals. An obs. syn. of 

chabazite. 

CUBICITB. Variant of cubizite. 



OUBIZrni 69 OnPROOALOITB 

OUBIZnOQ. A. O. Werner, 1804. Ludw. Min., ii, 210 (Kubizit), f. 
Kv/36^, 'a cube/ from its crystalline form. Au obs. syn. of anal- 
cite. 

OUBOITB. A. Breithaupt, 1882, Breit. Cbar.. 158 (Kuboit). f. 
Kvflo?, 'a cube,* from its crystalline form. An obs. syn. of analcite. 

OUBOIZmi. a a, Weiss, I8I6, Ges. Nat. Berl. Mug., vii, 181 
(Euboizit), f. Kvflo^, 'a cube,' from the form of its crystals. An obs. 
syn. of cbubazite. 

OULBBRITEI. ff. J. Brooke, 1886, Phil. Mag., 8d, viii, 261, f 
Culebras, Mexico, its locality. An obs. name for a supposed seleuide 
of zinc and mercury. 

OULSAGBBrm. J. P. Cooke, 1874, Am. Acad., 48, f. the Culsagee 
mine, N. C, its locality. A micaceous mineral near jeflerisite. 

OUMATOLTTE. See cymatolite. 

OUMBNGITZ:. A. Kenngott, 1858, Eenng. Min., 29 (Cumengit), 
after E. Cumenge, who tirst examined it. A doubtful oxide of antimony^ 
from Aljcriers. 

OUMMINGTONITB. Cheeter Dewey, 18*24, A. J. S., viii. 59, f. 
Cummington, Mass., its locality. A brownish var. of ainphibole, usu- 
ally fibrous. 

Also used by C, F. BammeUberg, 1860, Ramm. Min. Ch., 478. A 
Tar. of rhodonite. 

OUPRBINII. Variant of kupreine. 

OUPRBOUS ANGIiBSITB. C. U. Shepard, 1885, Shep. Min., ii, 
159, f. cuprum, * copper,' and anglesite. An obs. syn. of linarite. 

OUPRBOUS BISMUTH. B. Jameeon, 1820, Jam. Min.. iii, 886, f. 
its composition. An obs. syn. of both aikinite and witticheuite. 

OUPRBOUS BffANGANESB. W. A. Lampadius, 1817, Lamp. 
Erf., ii, 70 (Eupfermangan), f. its composition. A syn. of lampadite. 

OUPRTTB. TT. Haidinger, 1845, Raid. Handb., 548 (Cuprit), f. 
cuprum, 'copper.' Native red oxide of copper, often called red copper 
ore. 

OUPROAPATTTB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 45, f. its compo- 
sition. A var. of apatite, containing copper. 

OUPROBINNTTB. A, Weiebach, 1880, Weis. Char.. 42 (Cupro- 
binnit), f. its composition. A syn. of binnite. 

OUPROBISMUTTTB. E. 8. Dana, 1892, Dana Min.. 110, f. its 
composition. A sulpho-bismuthide of copper and silver, found in 
bluish-black, prismatic crystals. 

OX7PROOALOITB. A, Baimondi, 1878, Min. Perou. 185. A 
mixture of cuprite and calcite, whence the name. 



CUPROOASSITXIRITXI 70 OTANOUTB 

OnPROOASSITBRITEI. T. Ulke, 1892, Am. lust. M. E., xxi, 240, 
f. cuprum, 'copper,' aud cassiterite, because it contaius both copper aud 
tiu. Oxide of tin and copper, a decompositiou product of a copper 
bearing cussiterite. 

CUPRODESOLOIZmi. C. F, Rammelbberg, 1883. Ak. Ber. Sitz., 
1 J15, f. its composition. A var. of descloizite, coutniniDg copper. 

CUPROFERRITXI. A. Des Clokeaux, 1867, lust. Fr. Mem., xviii, 
667, f. its composition. A syn. of pisanite. 

CUPROMAGNESmi. A. Scacchi, 1873, Nnp. Ac. Atti, vi, 58, f. 
its comix)sition. Magnesium chloride, found ut Vesuvius. 

CUPROPLUMBITE. A. BreithaupU 1844, Pogg. Ann., Ixi. 672, f. 
its composition. A mixture of galeuite aud chalcocite. 

CUPROSOHEEUTE. J. D. Whitney, 1866, Acad. Cal., iil, 287, f. 
its composition. A var. of cuprotungstite. 

OUPROTUNQSTITB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab.. 32, f. its 

composition. Tuugstate of calcium, aud copper fouud as a yellowish- 
green crust. 

OUPROURANTTB. A. Breithaupt, 1865, Berg. HUt., xxiv. 802 
(Cuprourauit). An obs. syn. of torbernite. a phosphate of copper and 
uranium. 

OUPROVANADITB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 83. A syn. 

of chileitc, a vanadate of copper and lead. 

OUSPIDINE. A. Scacchi, 1876, Nap. Ac. Rend., 208 (Cuspidina), f. 
CQspis, -idis, * a spear,' on account of the shape of its crystals. Fluo- 
silicate of calcium, found in pale red, spear-shapeil crystals. 

OYANITE. A. O. Werrver, 1789, Berg. Jour., i, 377 (Cyanit), f. 
Kvdyo?, 'blue,* alluding to its most common color. Silicate of alumi- 
num, usually occurring in bladed crystals of a blue color. 

OYANOOHALOITB. R Hermann, 1869, Jour. Pk. Ch., cvi, 65 
(Cyanochalcit), f. Kvdvos, 'blue,' and x^^^^^* * copper,' alluding to its 
color and composition. A blue silicate of copper, much like chryso- 
colla. 

OTANOOHROITB. /. D. Dana, 1868. Dana Min., 649. A modi- 
fied form of cyanochrome. 

OYANOCHROMB. A, Scacchi, 1855, Scac. Vesuv., 191 (Ciano- 
(Tome), f. Kvavoi, *blue,' and ;fpo5>ua, 'color.' Hydrous sulphate of 
copper and potassium, found in blue crusts on lava. 

CTANOFBRRITE. Adam, 1869. Adam Tab., 66. f. Kvdyo%, 

'blue,' and ferrum, 'iron,' because it is a blue mineral containing iron. 
A syn. of pisanite. 

OTANOUTB. K Uaw, 1859, Ed. Phil. Jour., x, 84, f. Kvdro%, 



OTANOSB 71 DALEMINZTTB 

' blue/ alluding to its color, and Azl9o^. A hydrous silicate of calcium 
of a bluish color. 

OTANOSB. F.8. Beudant, 1832, Bend. Min., ii, 486. f. Kva'roi, 
'blue,' alluding to its color. A syn. of chalcanthitc, or native blue 
vitriol. 

OTANOSITB. Variant of cyanose. 

OTANOTRIOHTTB. E. F. Oloeker, 1889. Glock. Min.. 587 (Cyano- 
trichit), f. Kvdvoi, 'blue,' and Op/?, rplxo^r 'hair.' Sulphate of 
copper and aluminum, found in fibrous, blue crystals. 

OTOLOPBITB. A. Des Cloizeaux, 1863, Des CI. Min., 65, f. the 
Cyclopean Isl., its locality. A syn. of breislakite. 

OYOLOPITB. TF. 8. v, Waltershausen, 1853. Walt. Vul., 292, f. the 
Cyclopean Isl., its locality. A triclinic feldspar much like anortbite. 

OTUNDRTTB. See kylindrlte. 

OTMATOLITB. C. U, 8/iepard, 1868, Dana Min., 45o, f. Kv^ia, 
*a wave,' from the wavy surface it sometimes exhibits, and \iOo^, A 
syn. of pihiite. At first called cumatolite by Shepard. 

OYMOPHANB. U. J. Ilauy, 1797, Jour, des M. . v, 257, f. Kvjmx 
and (pitiveorOat, * to appear wavy,' alluding to its opalescence. An 
opalescent var. of chrysobcryl. 

OYMOFHANTTB. Variant of cymophane. 

OTPHOITB. Variant of kuphoite. 

OYPRINB. J. J. Berzelius, 1821, Berz. Loth., 263, f. cuprum, 
'copper,' because colored by copper. A pale blue var. of vesuvianite, 
colored by a trace of copper. 

OYPRTTB. E, F. Qlocktr, 1847, Glock. Syn., 25 (Cyprit). f. cyprius. 
'coppery.' An obs syn. of chalcocite. 

OTPRUSITB. P. F. Reinsch, 1881, Roy. Soc. Proc. xxxlii, 119, f. 
Cyprus, its locality. A doubtful sulphate of iron. 

OYRTOUTB. W. J. Knowlion, 1867, A. J. 8., 2d, xliv, 224. f. 
K-tJproS, 'curved,' l)ecause the faces of the crj-st^ils are rounded, and AzOoi. 
An altered var. of zircon. 

DAHLLTTB. W. C. Bn^ger and H, Blckntrfm, 1888. Vet. Ak. 
Stock. Oefv., xlv, 493 (Dahllit), in honor of the brothers T. and J. Dahll. 
Phosphate and carbonate of calcium, found as a thin, yellowish crust on 
apatite. 

DALARNFTB. A. Breiihaupt, 1835, Jour. Pk. Ch , iv. 259 (Dalarnif ), 
f. Dalarne, Sweden, its locality. An obs. syn. of arsenopyritc. 

DAIiBMINZrrB. A, Breiihaupt, 1862. Berq:. Hilt., xxi, 98 (Dele- 
minzit), f. Dalminzien. the ancient name of Freiberc:, Saxony, its locality. 
Sulphide of silver, like argentite. but diflerine in crystallization. 



DAMOURITE 72 DAUBRBITB 

DAMOURITXI. A. Delesse, 1845, Ann. Ch. Phys., 8d, xv, 248. in 
boDor of Prof. A. Damour. A hydrous potash mica, occurring in small, 
I^early scales. 

DANATTB. A, A, Hayes, 1833, A. J. 8.. xxiv, 886, after J. F. 
DuDii, who first noticed it. A var. of arsenopyrite, containing cobalt. 

DANAUTB. J. P, Cooke, 1866. A. J. 8., 2a. xlii. 72, in honor of 
I'rof. J. D. Dana, and XiBoS. 8ilicate and sulphide of gluciuum, iron, 
/.inc and manganese. 

DANBURTTB. 0. U. Shepard, 1889, A. J. 8., xxxv, 137, f. Dan- 
bury, Conn., its locality. Boro-silicate of calcium, resembling topaz. 

DANNBMORITB. A. KenngoU, 1855, Kenng. Ueb.. 61 (Danne- 
morit), f. Dauuemora, Sweden, its locality. A grayish -brown var. of 
hornblende. 

DAOURTTB. J, C Delameiherie, 1797. Delam. T. T., ii. 808, f. 
Daouria, Siberia, its locality. An obs. syn. of rubellite. 

DAPHNTTB. Q. Tsehermak, 1891, K. Ak. Wien., c, (1). 38 (Daphnit), 
f. dafpvrf, * the bay tree,' in alhisiou to iis form. A hydrous silicate of 
aluminum and iron, found in small, wreath-shaped, crystalline aggre- 
gates. 

BAPHTLLITB. R P. Gregmd IT. G. iMtsom, 1858, G. and L. Min., 
880. perhaps f. 6a-, intensive, aud <puX\ov, 'a leaf,' in allusion to the 
foliated structure which it often exhibiis. An obs. syn. of teiradyniite. 

DARAPSKITE. A. IHeUe, 1891, Zt. Kryst., xix, 445 (Darapskil). in 
honor of Dr. L. Darapsky. Nitrate and sulphate of sodium, found in 
colorless, tabular crystals. 

BARE RED SILVER ORB. A. O. Werner, 1789, Berg. Jour., i, 
381 (Dunkles Rothgiltigerz). A syn. of pyrargyrile. 

DARWINITE. D. Forbee, 1860, Phil. Mag., 4th, xx, 423, in honor 
of Charles Darwin. A syu. of whitneyite. 

DATHOLTTE. Variant of datolite. 

BATOLITB. J, Esmark, 1806. All. Jour. Chem., xvi, 1 (Datolith), 
f. Sarvtrdai, *to divide,' on accouut of the granular character of some of 
its varieties, and XiQo%. Ilydro-boro silicate of calcium, usually occurring 
in brilliant, colorless crystals. 

DAUBERTTE. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 64, after H. Dauber, 

who first analyzed it. A syn. of zippeite. 

BAUBREEUTB. /. L, Smith, 1876, A. J. S.. 3<i. xii. 109. in honor 
of Prof. P. Daubree, for his investigation of meteorites, and Xi6o^. A 
sulphide of iron and chromium, found in meteorites. 

BAUBRBITB. /. Domeyko, 1876, C. R., Ixxxii, 922, in honor of 
Prof. P. Daubree. Native oxy-chloride of bismuth. 



78 DBLPHnnTB 

DAUPHINITB. B. F. Oloeker, 1881, Glock. Min., 541 (Dauphinit), 
f. Dauphiny, France, its locality. An obs. syn. of octahedrite. 

DAURITB. Variant of daourite. 

DAVID80NITXI. T. Thorruon, 1886, Thorn. Min., i, 247, after 
Prof. Davidson, of Aberdeen, who discovered it. An obs. syn. of 
beryl. 

DAVZBSITB. L, Fletcher, 1889, Min. Mag., viii, 174, in honor of 
Thos. Davies, of the British Museum. A supposed oxy-chloride of lead, 
found in minute, white crystals. 

DAVrrXI. N. MiU, 1828, Quar. Jour., xxv, 882, in honor of Sir 
Humphrey Davy. An obs. syn. of alunogen. 

DAVRBUZTTB. L. L. de Kaninek, 1878, Belg. Ac, 2d, xlvi, 240, 
in honor of Prof. Ohas. J. Davreux. A hydrous silicate of aluminum 
and manganese, resembling asbestos. 

DAVTNB. T, Monticelli and N. CoveUi, 1825, Mont. Gov., 405 
(Davina), in honor of Sir Humphrey Davy. A syn. of nephelite. 

DAWSONTTB. B. J. Ilamngton, 1874, Can. Nat., vii, 805, in honor 
of Sir William Dawson. Hydrous carbonate of aluminum and sodium, 
found in fibrous or bladed crystals. 

DBOHBNITB. C. Bergetnann, 1850, Pogg. Ann., Ixxx, 893 (Deche-, 
nit), in honor of E. H. C. vou Dechea. Vanadate of lead and ziuc. 

DBGBROITB. H. J. Holmberg, 1850-51. Miu. Ges. St. Pet. Verb., 
828 (Degeroit), f. Degero, Finland, its localit}'. A var. of hisiugerite. 
The name degerveite is given in 1847, Glock. Syn., 805, without any 
description. Ii may be the same. 

DBGBRVBITB. See degeroite. 

DBLAFOSSITB. C. Frkdel, 1873, C. R., Ixxvii, 211, in honor of 
Prof. G. Delafosse. Oxide of iron and copper, perhaps a mixture. 

DBULNOUITB. A. Dufrenoy, 1856. Duf. Min., iii. 583, in honor 
of J. DelanoUe. A rose-colored clay, resembling montmorillonite. 

DBItANOVITB. Variant of delanouite. 

DBLARNITB. Variant of dalarnitc. 

DBLAWARTTB. /. Lea, 1866. Acad. Nat. Sci. Proc, 110, f. Dela- 
ware Co., Pa., its locality. A syn. of leunilite. 

DBIjBMINSSITB. See daleminzite. 

DBLBSSITB. C. F, Naumann, 1850, Naum. Min., 865 (Delessit). 
after Prof. A. Delesse. who first described it. A mineral similar to 
prochlorite, but containing much iron. 

DBLISLITB. A. Leymerie, 1859, Ley. Mhi., ii, 882, in honor of 
Bom6 de LTsle. An obs. syn. of freieslebenite. 

DBLPHINITB. JJ. B. Saussure, 1796, Saus. Alps, § 1918, f. 



DBLVAUXSNEI 74 

delphiniis, ' dauphin (dolphin)/ alluding to Dauphlny, its locality. A syn. 
of epidote. 

DJBLVAUXENE. Variant of delvauxine. 

DJBLVAUXINJB . See del vauzite. 

DJBLVAUZITE. A, U. DumonU 1888, Belg. Ac. Bull.. ▼, 296 
(Delvauxiue), after Prof. Delvaux de Feuffe, who first described it. A 
var. of dufrenitc. 

Also applied by C t. Hauer, 1854, Geol. Reich. Jahrb., 68 (Delvauxit), 
to a mineral which was later called borickite. 

DEMANTOID. N. Aordenshiold, 1877, Zt. Geol., iv, 819. f. demant, 
'diamond/ on account of its very brilliant lustre. An emerald-green 
var. of garnet. 

DEMIDOFFITII. If. Nordenskiuld, 1856. Soc. Nat. Mosc. Bull., 
xxix, 128 (Deraidovit), in honor of the Prince de Demidov. A var. of 
chrysocolla. 

DSMIBOVrrJE!. See deniidoffite. 

DERBYSHIRB SPAR. A common name for fluorite, because it is 
found abundantly in Derbyshire, Eng. 

DERMATINE. A, Breiihaiipt, 1830, Breit. Uib.. 86 (Dermatin), f. 
Sefjfxa, -«ro5, ' skin,' alluding to its occurrence ns an incrustation. Hy- 
drous silicate of nuignesium and iron, occurring as a green crust on 
serpentine. 

DERMATTTE. Variant of dermatine. 

DERNBAOHITE. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 49, f. Dernbach, 

Nassau, its locality. A syn. of bendnntite. 

DESAUIiESITE. G. A. Koenig, 1889, Acad. Nat. Sci. Proc, 184. 
after Major A. B. de Sanies, manager of the mine in which it was found. 
A hydrous silicate of nickel and zinc, occurring in amorphous, green 
incrustations. 

DESOLOIZTTE. A. Damour, 1854. Ann. Ch. Phys.. 3d, xli, 72. 
after Prof. A. Des Cloizeaux, who first described it. Vanadate of lead, 
found usually in greenish -black crystnls. 

DESMINE. K. W. Nose [1808, N5gg. Min. Stud.]. 1809, Jour, des 
M., XXV, 318, f. Stan?/, *a bundle/ because it occurs in little bundles of 
silky fibres. Certain silky, crystalline tufts found in lava, not now 
identified. 

Also used by A. BreiihaupU 1818. Hoff. Min., iv, (2), 40 (Desmiu). 
A syn. of stilbite. 

Also used by F. Bukeisen, 1857, K. Ak. Wien., xxiv, 286. A syn. 
of pufierite. 

DESTINEZTTB. H. Forir and A. Jarissen, 1880, Soc. Geol. Belg. 



OBVILUNB 75 DIAMOND 

Bull., Tii, p. czvii, in honor of Pierre Destiuez. Phosphate of iron, 
occurriDg iu yellow nodules. 

DBVUiUNXI. F, Piiani, 1864, C. R., lix, 818. iu honor of Prof. 
H. E. Sainte-CIaire Deville. A var. of lyellite, containing gypsum as 
an impurity. 

DBVOMTTB. 0. B, F, v. Moll, 1809, Mull Jahrb. Efem.. ▼, 148 
(Devonit), f. Devonshire, Eng.. its locality. An obs. syn. of wavellite. 

DBWALQUTTB. F. Pisani, 1872, C. R, Ixxv, 1542, in honor of 
Prof. O. Dewalque. A syn. of ardennite. 

DBWBYLTTB. E. Emmons. 1826, Emmons Min., 188, in honor of 
Prof. Chester Dewey, and AiGoS. Hydrous silicate of magnesium, found 
in resinous-looking masses. 

DIABANTAOHRONNTN. K. T. LUhe, 1870, Jahrb. Min., 1. 
A chlorite-like mineral which gives the green color to diabase, whence 
the name. 

DIABANTITB. Q. W, HatDCi, 1875, A. J. 8.. 8d, ix. 454. modified 
from diabantachronnyn, of which it is a synonym. 

DIAOLASITB. A, BreWuiupt, 1828. Brcit. Char.. 58 (Dlaklas), f. 
6iaKkdy, * to cleave,' alluding to its structure. An orthorhombic min- 
eral, resembling bronzite. 

DIADBLPHTTB. A, /^fdgren, 1884, Geol. FOr. FOrh., vii. 869 
(Diadelphit). f. StaS€Xip6i, 'a twin brother,* alluding to its close resem- 
blance to allaktite from the same locality. A syn. of hematolite. 

DIADOOHTTB. A, Breit/taupt, 1887. Jour. Pk. Ch., x, 503 (Diado- 
chlt), f. Stddoxoi, 'a successor,' because in it phosphorus has taken the 
place of arsenic. Hydrous sulphate and phosphate of iron, of resinous 
appearance and brownish color. 

DIAOONTTB. A, BreOhaupt, 1882. Breit. Char., 118 (Diagonit), f. 
diayoSrtoi, 'diagonal,' referring to its cleavage. An obs. syn. of 
brewsterite. 

DIAI-UkOB. B. J, Uauy, 1801, HaQy Min. . iii. 89. f. diaXXdy^, * dlf- 
ference/ in allusion to its cleavages. A thin, foliated mineral, generally 
green in color, which may be either pyroxene, amphibole or hypersthene. 
It is now generally used with a defining prefix. 

DTATiT i A QON. Variant of diallage. but used only for the amphibole 
▼ariety. 

DIALZiOOITB. Variant of dialogite. 

DIAX/)aiTB. 0. F. jMche, 1819, Jour. Ch. Ph., xxvi. 119 (Diiilo- 
git), perhaps f. btaXoytf, 'selection,' because picked out from other 
manganese minerals. A syn. of rhodochrosite. 

DIAMOND. From adamas. *the hardest steel,' and therefore the 



DIAMOND SPAR 76 DIETZBXTB 

hardest stone. Pure carbon, found in transparent crystals, usually color- 
less, the most yaluable of gems. 

DIAMOND SPAR. An early name for corundum, probably applied 
to other hard stones as well. 

DIANITE. F, V. Kobell, 1860, Jahrb. Min., 446 (Dianit), f. dianium. 
The name given to the columbite from Bodenmais, Bavaria, in which it 
was supposed dianium was found. 

DIAPHANITB. Error for dipbanite. 

DIAPHORTTE. C. F, Jasche, 1819, Jour. Ch. Ph., xxvi, 116, prob- 
ably f. 6id<pop6^t 'different,' because it was thought to differ from 
other mangauese silicates. An obs. syn. of allagite. 

Also used by V. «. Zepharovieh, 1871. K. Ak. Wien., Ixiii, 180 (Di- 
aphorit)^ f . 6ta<popd, * difference.' A species made from part of freiesle- 
benite, on the ground of a difference of crystallization. 

DIASPORE. R. J. ffaut/, 1801, HaUy Min., iii, 254, f. 6iaan€if>€tr, 
* to scatter,' because it decrepitates wben bcated. Hydrate of aluminum, 
usually occurring in white, crystalline scales. 

DIASPORirJB. Variant of diuspore. 

DIASTATITE. A, BreithaupU 1832, Breit. Char., 184 (Diastatit), f. 
SiaarrdToS, 'separated.' A black hornblende, mnde a var. on account 
of a difference of its angle of crystallization. 

DIOHROITE. L, Cordier, 1809. Jour, des M., xxv, 129, f. dii, 
''double,' and xpota, 'color,' because it transmits two colors. A syn. 
of iolite. 

DIOEINSONITJE!. O. J, Brv^h and E. 8. Da?ia, 1878, A. J. S., 8d, 
xvi, 114, after the Rev. John Dickinson, in recognition of his interest in 
its locality. Hydrous phosphate of manganese, iron, calcium and 
sodium, usually green and micaceous in structure. 

DIOESONITII. 8. Meunier, 1893, Meun. Fers Met., 41, f. Dickson 
Co., Tenn., where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 

DIDRIMITII. See didymite. 

DIDYMm:. C. E. 8chaufhautl, 1848, Ann. Ch. Pharm., xlvi, 880 
(Didrimit), f. SiSvMoi, 'a twin,' because it was thought to be a second 
silicate containing calcium carbonate in combination. A micaceous 
mineral near muscovite. Didriniite. the first foi-m, was soon after changed 
by the author to didymite, the form now in use. 

DIETRIOHITII. J. V. Schrockinger, 1878, Geol. Reich. Verb., 189 
(Dietrichit), after Dr. Dietrich, who first analyzed it. A fibrous alum, 
containing zinc and other bases. 

DIBTZBITB. A. Osann, 1804. Zt. Kryst., xxiii, 588 (Dietzeit), 
after Dr. A. Dietze, who had described it under the name iodchromate. 



XHQBNXTB 77 DIPIiOITB 

Ao iodo-chromate of calcium, found in small, yellow crystals in soda-nitre. 

DIGBNITE. A. BreiihaupU 1844, Pogg. Ann., Ixi, 673 (Digenit). f. 
diyeyrji, * of two sexes or kinds,* because it contains two copper sulphides. 
A mixture of covellite and cbalcocite, resulting from decomposition. 

DIHTDBITE. B. Hermann, 1846, Jour. Pk. Ch., xxxvii, 178 
(Dibydrit), because it contains two molecules of water. A Tar. of 
pseudoraalacbite. 

DXHTDRO-THENARDITXI. B. Markownikaw, 1887, Jour. Russ. 
Oh. Ph. Soc., xix, 252. f. its composition. Sulphate of sodium, con- 
taining two molecules of water. 

DELLENBURGITE. A. De% CUnzeaux, 1862, Des 01. Min., 124. f. 
Dilleuburg. Nassau, its locality. A var. of cbrysocoUa, containing 
carbonate of copper. 

DILUimi. W, Haidinger, 1849, Pogg. Ann., Ixxvii, 577 (Dillnit). 
f. Dilln, Saxony, its locality. A white, earthy substance, the matrix of 
diaspore. 

DIMAGNBTITB. C, V. 8hepard, 1852. A. J. S., 2d, xiii, 802. 
Announced as a dimorphous form of magnetite, but proved later to be a 
pseudomorph. 

DIMORPHTTB. A. Scaechi, 1849, Scac. Geol. Oamp., 116 (Dimor- 
fina). A supposed dimorphous form of realgar. 

DINTTB. /. Meneghini, 1852, Gaz. Med. Ital., 2d, ii, 233, after 
Prof. O. Dini, who found it. A yellowish hydrocarbon, which fuses by 
the warmth of the hand. 

DIOPSIDB. B. J. d:Andrada, 1800, All. Jour. Chem., iv, 31, f. (5/?, 
* two,' and oipai?, ' view,' because two views can be lukeu of its prismatic 
form. One of the many names given tu pyroxene, now coniiucd to the 
transparent varieties. 

DIOPTA8B. E. J. Hauy, 1797, Jour, des M.. v, 274, f. dionrevetv, 
'to see into,' because its cleavage planes can be distinguished on looking 
into a crystal. An emerald-green silicate of copper, always found in 
crystals. 

DIOZTLTTB. A. BreWiaupt, 1832, Breit. Ohar., 85 (Dioxylith). f. 
5i$, 'two,' and o^vi, 'acid,' because it contains two acids, and A/9o?. 
An obs. syn. of lanarkite. 

DIPHANITB. N. NordenskiOld, 1846, Acad. St. Pet. Bull., v, 17, f. 
d/S and ipa{ye<rSai, 'to appear double,' alluding to its dichroism. An 
obs. syn. of margarite. 

DIPIiOrrB. A. BreiViaupt, [1825, Gmelin's Ohem. Unter. des 
Diploits], 1826, Hausm. Min., 465 (Diploit). f. 8inX6o<i, 'twofold,' allud- 
ing to its two perfect cleavages. An obs. syn. of latrobite. 



OIPYRI] 78 DOLOmTB 



B, /. Hauy, 1801, Hatty Min., iii, 178, f. Sii, * double, 
and nvp, * tire,' tliat Is, doubly acted on by heat, alluding to fusion and 
phosphorescence. Silicate of aluminum, calcium and sodium, found 
in coarse, ^vliitish crystals. 

DIPYRITE. T, A. Beadwm, 1867, Read. Ind., 11. f. Si^, 'twice,' 
and pyrites. A syn. of pyrrhotite. 

Also A variant of dipyre. 

DISORASrrJB. Variant of dyscrasite. 

DISOMOSB. F, 8. Beudani, 1882. Beud. Min., ii, 448. f. Sii, 
'two,' and ouoio%, Mili:e,' because it resembles two other minerala. 
An obs. syn. of gersdorffite. 

DISTERITE. Error for disterrite. 

DISTERRirJB. A. Breithaupt, 1847, Jour. Pk. Ch., xli, 154 (Dister- 
rit), f. (5/?, ' two.' and artppoi, ' hard.' that is, of two hardnesses, because 
the sides of the prism are harder than the base. A syn. of brandisite. 

DISTH£NE. B. J. llauy, 1801, Hatty Miu.. iii. 101, f. di5, 'two/ 
and aOeyoS, 'strong,' alluding to its unequal hardness in two directions. 
A syn. of cyaiiite. 

DITTMARITE. R. W, E. Macltor, 1887, Chem. News. Iv. 315, in 
honor of Prof. \V. Dittmar, of Glasgow. An undescribed mineral from 
near Bullarut, Victoria. 

DOBSOHAUrrJB. J, D. Dana, 1868. Dana Min., 78, f. Dobschau, 
Hungary, its lociility. A var. of gersdorffite. 

DOGNACSEAITE. J. A. Krenner [1884. FOld. KOz., xiv. 564]. 1885. 
Zi. Kryst., xi. 265 (Doguucskuit). f. Dognacska. Hungaiy, its locality. 
Sulphide of bismuth and copper. 

DOG-TOOTH SPAR. An early popular name for calcite in pointed 
crystals, which have some resemblance to teeth. 

DOLEROPHANITE. A, 8caec7ii. 1878 (read 1870), Nap. Ac. Atti, 
V, 22 (Dolerofano), f. doXefjoS, * deceitful,' and tpaiveGiiat, Uo appear/ 
because its appeanince does not suggest its composition. A hydroua 
sulphate of copper, in small, brown crystals in lava. 

DOIilANTTE. According to A. Dm Cloueaux, 1862. Des CI. Min., 
435. this name is attached to a specimen, apparently a zeolite, found in an 
English collection; no author or derivation is given. Probably an error 
for doranite. 

DOLOMIE. See dolomite. 

DOLOMrra. IL B. SaiM8iire, 1796. Saus. Alps, § 1929 (Dolomlr). 
after Prof. D. G. Dolomieu, who first examined it. Carbonate of cal- 
cium and magnesium, occurring massive and in white or brownish, rhom- 
bohedral crystals. 



DOMiNarrB 79 dudleytte 

DOMINGITB. P. Groih, 1889, Groth Tab., 80 (Domingit), f. the 
Domingo mine, Colo., its locality. A syu. of warrenite. 

DOMBYKITE. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Min.. 562 (Domeykit), 
after Prof. I. Domeyko, who had examined it. Arsenide of copper, of 
grayish color and metallic lustre. 

DONAOARGYRTTE. E. J. Chapman, 1848, Chap. Min., 128. 
Name said to be taken from the catalogue of the British Museum. It is 
probably f. dordi, *a reed,' and apyufjo?, 'silver,' in allusion to the 
shape of its crystals and its composition. A syu. oi freieslebenitc. 

DOPPLERTTE. W, Haidinger, 1849. K. Ak. Wien, ii. 287 (Dop- 
plerit). after Bergrath Ch. Doppler, who first brought it to notice. A 
jelly-like hydrocarbon from certain peat beds. 

DORANTTB. T. Thomson, 1858, G. and L. Min., 448, in honor of P. 
Doran. an Irish geologist. A doubtful zeolitic mineral allied to clmbasite. 

DOUOLASITB. H. PreeJit, 1880, Deut. Chem. Ges. Ber., xiii, (b). 
2837 (Douglasit), f. Douglasshall, Prussia, its locality. Hydrous chlo- 
ride of iron and potassium in small, green crystals. 

DRAGOBHTB. Error for dragon ite. 

DRAGONTTB. Pliny, 77. Pliny Hist., Bk. 87. 57 (Drarouitis), the 
fabulous stone said to be obtained from the head of the flying dragon. 
An obs. name for quartz crystals found in gravel, which have lost their 
brilliancy and angular form, and consequently their identity, and popu- 
larly thought to have had the origin indicated above. 

DRAVITB. Q. TBchermak, 1888, Tscher. Min., 472 (Dravit). f. the 
Drave dist., Carinthia, its locality. A greenish or brownish magnesian 
tourmaline. 

DRBBTTB. Variant of dreelite. 

DREBUTB. A. Ihtjrenoy, 1885, Ann. Ch. Phys., Ix, 102, in honor 
of £. de Dree. Sulphate of barium and calcium, found in small, pearly- 
white crystals, probably a var. of barite. 

DROP-STONE. A popular name for calcite in the form of stalactites. 

DRT BONE. A miners' name for smithsonitc. so called because it 
does not yield lead, though found with lead ore. 

DUOKTOWNITE. C, U. Shepard, 1859, Kept. Mt. Pisgah. 8, f. 
Ducktown, Tenn., its locality. An intimate mixture of pyrite and 
chalcodte. 

DUDaBONITB. M. F. Heddle, 1889, Min Mag., viii. 200, after P. 
Dudgeon, who discovered it. Hydrous arsenate of nickel and calcium. 

OUBLBYITB. F. A. Genth, 1873, Am. Phil. Soc. xiii. 404, f. 
Dudleyville, Ala., its locality. A hydrous mica, resulting from the 
alteiAtioa of margarite 



DXTFRENmi 80 DTSORA8ITB 

DUFRENITE. A, Brongniari, 1883, Brong. Tab., 20, in honor of 
A. Dufrenoy. Hydrous pbosphtite of iron, occurriug in dull, greenish 
nodules and fibrous masses. 

DXTFRBNOYSITB. A, Damovr, 1845. Ann. Cli. Phys., 8d, xiv, 
879, in honor of A. Dufrenoy. A sulph -arsenide of lead, occurring in 
highly modified prisms of gray colof and metallic lustre. 

Sariorite and binnite have also been so called. 

DUMASmi. A, DeUsse, 1847, Dnf. Miu., iii, 790. in honor of Prof. 
J. B. Dumas. A chlorite like mineral near ripidolite. 

DUMORTISRITE. F, Oonnard, 1881, Bull. Soc. Min., iv, 2, in 
honor of E. Dumortier, of Lyous. A silicate of aluminum, of a blue 
color, exhibiting unusual dichroism. 

DUMREIOHBRTTB. C. Dolter [1882. D5lt. Cap. V.]. 1884. Zt. 
Kryst., viii, 416 (Dumreicherit), in honor of Al. v. Dumreicher. A hy- 
drous sulphate of aluminum and magnesium. 

DUPORTHITB. J. H. Collins, 1877, Min. Mag., i, 226. f. Duporth. 
Cornwall, its locality. An asbestos-like mineral found in gray fibres in 
serpentine. 

DXJPORTITB. Variant of duporthite. 

DURANGITB. Q, J. Brush, 1869, A. J. 8., 2d, xlviii, 188. f. 
Durango, Mexico, its locality. Fluo-arseuate of aluminum and sodium, 
occurring in small, orange-red crystals. 

DURDBNITB. E. 8. Dana and H, L. WeUs, 1890, A. J. S., 8d, xl, 
80, after Henry 8. Durden, of San Francisco, from whom it was received. 
Hydrous tellurite of iron, found in greenish grains in a quartzose con- 
glomerate. 

DtTRFBLDTTTB. A, Raimondi, 1878. Min. Pcrou. 125, in honor 
of R DQrfeldt. Sulph antimonlde of lead, silver and manganese. 

DUSODHiB. Variant of dysodilc. 

DUZITE. C, DdlUr, 1874, Geol. Reichs. Verb.. 145 (Duxit), f. Dux. 
Bohemia, its locality. A dark brown resin, near walcbowite. 

DYOXAIiITZ3. Yuriani of dioxallte. 

DYRIPE. EiTor for dipyre. 

DYPLITTm. Error for dyslytite. 

DYSANALTTB. A. Knop, 1877, Zt. Kryst., i, 284 (Dysanalyt), f. 
Sva-avdXvTo^, 'hard to undo,' because difficult to analyze. Columbo- 
titanate of calcium, in black crystals, earlier mistaken for perowskite. 

DTSOLASITB. A. Connell, 1834. Ed. New Phil. Jour., xvi. 1P8, f. 
dv?, * hard,' and KXdr ' to break,* alluding to its toughness. A syn. of 
okenite. 

DTSORASrm. F, 8. Beudant, 1882, Beud Min.. ii. 618 (DiscTMe), 



BTSKOZiXTZI 81 BDBLFORSTTB 

f. dva-Kpdati, 'a bad mixture/ alluding to the antimony it contains. 
Antimonlde of silver, occurring in silver-white crystals, and massive. 

DTSEOLITB. A, Breithaupt, 1823, Breit. Char., 229 (Dyskolit), f. 
dfJaKoXoi, ' something which presents difficulties.* alluding to its insolu- 
bility and refractory character. An obs. syn. of saussurite. 

DTSLUITB. W. H. Keating, 1821, Acad. Nat. Sci. Jour., ii. 287, f. 
6vi, * hard,' and Xvetv, * to loosen,' because hard to decompose. A var. 
of gahnite, containing manganese. 

DYSLTTTTX]. C. U, S/iepard, 1846, A. J. S., 2d, ii. 880, f. dvaXvroi, 
'insoluble.' because an insoluble residue from a meteoric iron. A brown 
powder derived from meteorites, aualagous in composition to schreibersite. 

DT80DILB. L, Cordier, 1808, Jour, des M., xxiii, 275, f. dvcroidrj^, 
* bad-smelling.' A very inflammable hydrocarbon, which gives an odor 
like asafcBtida when burned. 

DTSSNTTB. F, o. Kobell, 1888, Eob. Min., 828 (Dyssnit), perhaps f. 
dtSarovi, * dull,' alluding to its lack of lustre. A black silicate of man- 
ganese, resulting from the alteration of fowlerite. 

DYSTOMB SPAR. F. Mbht, 1820, Mohs Char., 57, f. di^aro/io^, 
'hard to cut,' on account of its imperfect cleavage. An obs. syn. of 
datolite. 

DYSYNTRBBITB. C. U. Shepard, 1851, Am. Assoc., iv, 811, f. 6v%, 
'bard,' and avrrpi/Seir, Mo crush,' from the difficulty of reducing it to 
powder. A hydrous silicate of aluminum and potassium, classed under 
piui!e. 

BAGIjZISTONB. An obs. name for a var. of clay iron ore, found 
in nodules, having a loose kernel. So called because of the popular 
belief that eagles took them to their nests. 

BARTH-FLAX. An early popular name for asbestos. 

BARTH-FOAM. A popular name for aphrite. 

BARTHY OALAMTNB. An early popular name for hydrozincite. 

BARTHY OOBAIiT. A syn. of asbolite. 

BODBBSTTB. A. B, Nardenskiold, 1877, Geol. F5r. FOrh., iii. 879 
(Ekdemit), f. eKdff/io^, 'unusual.' Chloro-arsenite of lead, found in 
small, yellow masses, foliated or granular. 

BDBLFOR8ITB. A. J. Betzius, 1819, Jour. Ch. Ph., xxvii, 886 
(^delforsit), f. iEdelfors, Sweden, its locality. A var. of laumontite, 
earlier called * Red Zeolite of ^delfors.' 

Also used by F. S. BeudanU 1882, Beud. Min., ii, 216 (Edelforse). 
An impure var. of wollastonite. 



EDBLITB 82 

BDEUTB. R Kiritan, 1794, Kirw. Min., 1, 276 (iBdelite), f. 
^delfors. Sweden, its locality. An obs. name for a reddish, earthy var. 
of natrolitc. 

Also used by L, P, WalmsUdt, 1825, Berz. Jahres,, y, 217 (uEdelit). 
An ol>s. syn. of prehnite. 

BDBNITB. E, F, Oloeker, 1839, Glock. Min., 410 (Edenit), f. Eden- 
ville, N. Y., its locality. An aluminous hornblende, of white or gray 
color. 

BDINGTONITB. W. Haidinger, 1825, Ed. Jour. Sci.. iii, 816, after 
Mr. Edington, of Glasgow, who found it. Hydrous silicate of aluminum 
and barium. 

BDISONITB. W. E. Hidden, 1888, A. J. 8.. 8d, xxxvi, 272, in honor 
of Thos. A. Edison. Titanic acid, occurring in golden-brown, ortho- 
rhombic crystals. 

BDMONDSONTTB. W, Flight, 1883, Geol. Mag., 2il, x, 59. in 
honor of Head-master Geo. Edmoudson, of Queenwood Ck>llege, Hamp- 
shire. One of the varieties of meteoric iron. 

BDWARDSITB. G. U. Shejmrd, 1837. A. J. 8., xxxii. 162, in honor 
of Gov. H. W. Edwards. An obs. syn. of monazite. 

BOBRAN. A, O. Werner, 1817, Wern. Letz , 34, f. Eger, Bohemia, 
its locality. A brown var. of vesuvianite. 

BGGONITB. A, Schravf, 18T9. Zt. Kryst., iii. 852 (Eggonit), f. 
tyyoroc, 'a grandson.' as being in the third generation in the series of 
ziuc-cadmium compounds. A grayish silicate containing cadmium. 

BOYPTTAN JASPBR. A brown jasper, found in pebbles and 
small boulders in Egypt. 

BGYPTIAN PEBBLB. A syn. of Egyptian jasper. 

BHUTB. A, Breithaupt, 1832, Breil. Char , 45 (Ehlit), f. Ehl, on 
the Rhine, its locality. A var. of pseudomalachite. 

BHRBNBBRGITB. J. Aiiggerath, 1852. Nat. Ver. Bonn, ix, 878 
(Ehrenbergit), after Prof. C. G. Ehrenberg, who examined it. A soft, 
amorphous, rose-red mineral, near cimolite. 

BIOHWAUDITB. Af. Web8kj/, 1883, Ak. Ber. Sitz.. xxviil. 671 
(Eichwaldit), after J. I. Eichwald, who first found it. Borate of alumi- 
num, forming the cenintl part of certain crystals, earlier called beryl. 

BIMBUTB. Error for cimolite. 

BEBBBRGITB. J. N. Fuehs, 1818, E. Ak. MOnch. Denk., Til. 65 
(Ekebergit), after A. G. Ekeberg. who had described it. A member of 
the scapolite group, distinguished from wcrnorite onl}' by analysis. 



BEMANTTB 88 BUASITE 

ZSKMANTTB. L. J. IgeUtrom, 1865, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv.. xxii. 
607 (Ekinannit), after G. Ekmuu, proprietor of tlie mine from which it 
came. Hydrous silicate of iron and manganese, clilorite-like in appear- 
ance. 

EKMANNrm. Sec ekmanite. 

BliiBITB. L. Darapsky, 1890, Jahrb. Min.. i, 64 (Elait), f. eXaia, 
'an olive.' in allusion to its color. One of several names proposed as 
substitutes for copiapite and coquimbilc. 

EUEOLITB. M. H. KUiproth, 1809. Ges. Nat. Berl. Mag., iii. 43 
(Elsolilh), f. eXaior, *oil.' on account of its greasy lustre, and Azl9o?. 
A var. of nephclite found in coarse crystals. 

BLAOLTTE. Variant of eloeolite. 

BLASMOSB. F. 8. BeucUint, 1833, Beud. Min., ii, 539. f. eAawo5, 
'a plate of metal,' alluding to its foliated and metallic appearance. An 
obs. syn. of nagyagite; also later of altaite. 

BLASMOBINB. Variant of elasmose. 

BLASTIO BITUMBN. /. C. Delametherie, 1787, Jour, de Phys., 
zxxi, 81 (Bitume elastique). A syn. of elatcrite. 

BLATBRTTB. /. F. L. Uausmann, 1813. Haus. Min., i, 87 (Elat- 
erit). f. iXdrrffj, * a driver,' referring to its elasticity. An elastic, bitu- 
minous mineral resembling india-rubber. 

BLBATTB. C. L. Giesecke, 1832. Gicsecke Cat., 23, f. Elba, its 
locality. An obs. syn. of ilvaite. 

BLBPTRIO OALAMINB. J. Smiihson, 1803. Phil. Trans.. 12. on 
account of its electrical properties when heated. Silicate of zinc, now 
called simply calamine by many authors. 

BLBOTRUM. From jfXeKTpoy, which means amber, and also an 
alloy of gold and silver. Used by early writers in the first meaning, and 
still used in the second meaning. 

BLEONORTTB. A, Nies, 1880. Oberh. Ges., xix, 111 (Eleonorii), f. 
the Eleonore mine, near Giesscn, its locality. A syn. of beraunite. 

BLFSTORPITB. L. J. Jgelstrim, 1893. Geo!. FOr. FOrii.. xv, 472 
(Elfstorpit). f. the Elfvestorp iron works, near Sj5grufvau, Sweden, its 
locality. Hydrous arsenate of manganese. 

BLHUTARTTB. A. L. Sack (probably). 1834. Jahrb. Min., 28 
(Elhuyarit), after F. d'Elhuyer. An obs. syn. of allophane. 

BlaHUYAZTTB. Error for elhuyarite. 

BlilASITB. W, Haidinger, 1852, Geol. Reich. Jahrb., iii, 124 



ELLAGITB 84 EMERAUDINB 

(Eliasit), f. the Elias miDe, Joachimstbal, its locality. Uranium hydrate, 
very near gum mite. 

ELLAGITE. N. NardenskiOld, 1849, Nord. Atom. Ch. Min. Syst, 
142 (EUagit). according to A. E. NordenskiOld (priv. com., July 6th, 1898), 
probably deiived f. ^v, *in/ aud Xdyoov, *a hollow,* because found in a 
so-called 'giant kettle.' A ferriferous vur. of uatrolile. 

ELLONTTB. M. F, HeddU, 1884, Min. Mag., ▼, 80, f. Ellon. 
Scotland, its locality. Hydrous silicate of magnesium, containing free 
silica. 

ELPASOLITB. TF. Cross and W. F, Hillebrand, 1885. Geol. Sunr. 
U. S. Bull., iii, 275, f. El Paso Co., Colo., its locality. Fluoride of 
potassium, aluminum and sodium. 

ELPIDITB. G. Lindsirim, 1894. Geol. F6r. FOrh., xvi, 880 (Elpidit). 
f. eAff^if, -z^o?, ' hope,* because there is a reasonable expectation of finding 
other interesting minerals from the same locality. Hydrous silicate of 
zirconium and sodium. 

ELROQUTTB. C, U. Sfiepard, 1877. Shep. Cont. Min., 6, f. Elroque 
Isl., Caribbean Sea. its locality. A doubtful hydrous silicate of iron and 
aluminum, with phosphate of chromium. 

EMBOLITB. A. BreWuiupU 1849, Fogg. Ann., Ixxvii, 184 (Embo- 
lit), f. €u/36Xiov, 'an intermediate,' because intermediate between chloride 
and bromide of silver. Chlorobromide of silver, of greenish color and 
waxy lustre. 

BMBRIOHTTTB. Error fur embrithite. 

BMBRIOTTTB. Error for embrithite. 

EMBRITHITB. A. BreOhaupU 1887, Jour. Pk. Ch., x, 442 (Embrl- 
thit), f . eft/Sfj70r}i, ' heavy.' alluding to its weight. A syn. of boulan- 
gerite. 

EMBRITHRITB. Error for embrithite. 

EMBRAIiD. From a^apcry'in^, *a light green precious stone.' not 
certainly identified with the modern emerald, which is the emerald-green 
var. of beryl. 

BBflBRALD OOPPBR. A. Aikin, 1807. Aik. Diet., i, 828, from ito 
color. An obs. syn. of dioptase, probably a popular name earlier. 

BBflBRALD MALAOHTTB. A popular name for dioptase. 

BMBRALD NIOEBL. B. Silliman, Jr., 1848, A. J. S., 2d, vi. 248, 
from its color. A syn. of zaratite. 

BMBRAUDINB. J. C. Delameifune, 1797, Delam. T. T.. ii, 280. f. 
emeraude, * emerald.' An obs. syn. of dioptase. 



85 ENSTADFTB 

BMBRAUDITB. Variant of emeraudine. 
EMBRITX]. VariaDt of euiery. 

BAIBRT. From (TMrjpti, 'emery powder/ which was used by the 
SDcient lapidaries. Impure corundum, usually mixed with maguetite or 
hematite. 

EMBRTUTB. /. L. Smith, 1849, A. J., S.. 2d, vii. 285, f. emery 
and Az9o?, because occurring with emery. A syu. of nmrgarite. 

BMMONITB. T, TJiotMon, 1886, Rec. Geu. Sci., iii, 41 5, after Prof. 
E. Emmons, who first called attention to it. A var. of sirontiauite, con- 
taining calcite as an impurity. 

EMMONSITB. W, F, Hillebrand, 1885, Colo. Sci. Soc.. ii. (1), 20, in 
honor of S. F. Emmons. Tellurite of iron, found in yellowish-green, 
crystalline scales. 

Also a variant of emmonite. 

EMPHOUTB. L, J. IgeUtrom, 1888, Bull. Soc. Min., tI, 40, f. 
€M(pooX€v€ty, * to hide,' because it is difficult to see it. A syn. of 
diaspore. 

BBSPLBOTITB. A. Kenngott, 1855, Eenng. Ueb. for 1858, 125 
(Emplektit), f. e^nXeKvo^, * entwined,' because so closely associated with 
quartz. Sulphide of bismuth and copper, found in bright, tin-white 
crystals. 

BNARGITB. A. Breithaupt, 1850, Fogg. Ann., Ixxx. 888 (Enargit), 
f. evafjyff, * apparent,' referring to its perfect cleavage. Sulph-arsenide 
of copper, found in brilliant, black crystals. 

ENOBIiADITB. T. 8. Hunt, 1846, A. J. S.. 2d. ii, 80, after Encela- 
dus, one of the Titans, because it is a titanium compound. A var. of 
warwickite. found in large crystals. 

BNDELLIONB. J. L. Bournon, 1818. Bourn. Cat., 409, f. Endel- 
lion. Cornwall, its locality. An obs. syn. of bouruonite. 
BNDBIjIjIONITB. Variant of endellione. 

TB. N. U, Muhlenberg, 1885. Am. Phil. Soc, xxii. 867, 



in honor of Dr. F. M Endlich. Arseno-vanadate of lead, occurring in 
yellowish crystals. 

BNGBLHARDTITB. E. «. Hofmann, 1^58, Eoks. Min.. iii, 150 
(Engelhardit), probably in honor of Prof. M. v. Engclliardt. A syu. of 
zircon. 

BNOPHTTB. A, Schrauf, 1882, Zt. Kryst., vi, 845 (Enophit), be- 
cause found in ophite (serpentine). A chloritic var. of serpentine. 

BNSTADITB. Variant of enstatite. 



SNSTATITXI 86 

ENSTATTm. A.KenngoU, 1855, E. Ak. Wien, xvi. 3 62 (EuBtatit), 
f. evaTart;?, 'au opponeul/ because so refractory before the blowpipe. 
Silicate of uiuguesium, from whitish to olive-greeu iu color, aud with 
a pearly or bronzy lustre. 

BNYSITE. J. ILColUns, 1876, Min. Mag., i, 9, after J. S. Enys. on 
whose property it was found. A mixture of copper sulphate aud other 
minerals, found as a stalagmitic, green crust. 

EOSrrB. A. Sclira^f, 1871, Jahrb. Min.. 163 (Eosit), f. ;/f.;?, ' morn- 
ing,' from its rosy color. Vanado molybdatc of lead, occurring in minute, 
aurora-red octahedrons. 

BOSPHORITE. O. J. Brush and E, 8. Dana, 1878, A. J. 8.. 8d, 
XX. 898, f. rfGO(T(p6iio%, * dawn-bearer,' alluding to its pink color. A var. 
of childrcnite, containing much manganese. 

BPHBSITB. J. L. Smith, 1851. A. J. S., 2d, xi, 59, f. Ephesus. 
where it was found. A syn. of margaiile. 

BPIBOULANaBRITB. M. Websky, 1869. Zt. Geol., 747 (Epibou- 
langerit), f. eV/, 'upon,' and boulangerite, from its mode of occurrence. 
A sulph-uutimonide of lead, resulting from tlie decomposition of bou- 
langerite. 

BPIOHLORITB. (7. F. RammeUherg, 1849, Pogg. Ann., Ixxiii, 487 
(Epichlorit). f. eV/, 'near,' and chlorite, because it resembles chlorite. 
A fibrous mineral near chlorite. 

BPIDIDYMITB. F. FUnk, 1893, Geol. FOr. FOrh.. xy, 201 (Epi- 
didymit), f. eV/. ' near.' and didymite, because it is considered a dimor- 
phous form of eudidymite, having the same composition, but being 
orthorhombic. 

BPIDOTB. R. J. Hauy, 1801, Hatty Min.. iii. 72. f. eiciSoati, Mn- 
crease.' because the base of the prism has one side longer than the other. 
Silicate of aluminum, iron and calcium, usually found in dark green 
crystals. 

EPIDOTITB. Variant of epidote. 

BPIGENITB. F. t. Sandberger, 1869, Pogg. Ann., cxxxvi, 502 
(Epigenit), f. emxeyj}?, 'growing after,' because found grown upon other 
minerals. Sulph -arsenide of iron and copper. 

Also used by L. J. Igelstrdm, 1889, Geol. F5r. FOrh., for the mineral 
Inter called neotesite. 

BPiaLAUBITB. a U. Shepard, 1856. A. J. S., 2d, xxii, 99, so 
named because found in crystals implanted on glaubapatite. A doubtful 
compound of sodium sulphate and calcium phosphate. 

BPIMILLBRTTB. Adam, 1869. Adam Tab., 65, because asso- 
ciated with mlllerite. A syn. of moreuosite. 



87 ERIOOHALOmS 

EPIPHANITB. L. J. Igelstrom, 1868, Vet. Ak. Slock. Oefv., 29 
(Epiphauit), f. eni0aiyeiv, 'to sbiue forth/ alluding to its lustre. A 
micaceous mineral near eukamtite. 

EPIPHOSPHORITII. A. BreWiaupt, 1866, Berg. HQt., xxv, lU 
(Eplphosphorit), f. eni, 'near/ and phosphorite. A mineral not fully 
examined, but probably a var. of apatite (phosphorite). 

JBPISPHJERITXI. A, Knop[iQ8S, Oberrh. Geol. Ver., 13], 1891. Zt. 
Kryst., xviii, 668 (Episphcerit), f. eni, 'upon,' and atpaifjd, *a ball,* in 
allusion to its position and shape. An imperfectly described zeolite, 
found in white radiated balls in phonolite. 

JBPISTILBITB. G. Rose, 1826, Pogg. Ann., vi. 183 (Epistilbit), f. 
eni, 'near,' and stilbite, because near stilbite. Hydrous silicate of 
aluminum, calcium and sodium. 

BP80MITB. J. a Delameiherie, 1806, Jour, de Phys., Ixii, 860 
(Epsonite), f. Epsom, Eng., its locality. Sulphate of magnesium, as a 
mineral. 

BPSOM SALT. The popular name for sulphate of magnesium^ 
whether natural or artificial. 

EPSONITB. See epsomite. 

EROINTTE. a A. O, Napions, 1797, Nap. Min., 289, f. Sylva 
Hercynia, the ancient name for the Bohemian forests. An obs. syn. of 
harmotome. 

BRDMANNTTB. II. Esmark, 1853. Pogg. Ann., Ixxxviii. 163 (Extl. 
man nit), probably in honor of A. Erdmann. A complicated silicate of 
cerium and other bases, not fully examined. 

BREMITE. a U, ShejMird, 1887. A. J. S., xxxii, 341. f. epe/z/a, 
' solitude.' because of its occurrence in isolated crystals. An obs. syn. 
of monazite. 

BRUJTB. H. a Lewis, 1880, Acad. Nat. Sci., 292. f. epiov, * wool,' 
because of its occurrence in little fibrous tufts, and XtVoi. Found in 
cavities in quartz crystals ; composition unknown. 

BRINTTB. W. Uaidinger, 1828. Ann. Phil, 2d, iv, 154, f. Erin, be- 
cause it was supposed to have come from Ireland. A green, fibrous arsen- 
ate of copper. 

Also used by T. Thomson, [1831, Bryce Tab.]. 1883, Phil. Mag., 3d, iii, 
85. A reddish, clay-like mineral near montmorillonite, from the Giant's 
Causeway. 

BRIOOHALOITB. A. Scaechi, 1884, Nap. Ac. Rend., xxiii, 158 
(Eriocalco), f. epior, * wool/ and ;t<3rA.Ko?, ' copper,' because it is a fibrous 
copper mineraL Chloride of copper, found in wool-like tufts in lava. 



88 Bs; 

BRIiAMITB. Error for erlanite. 

BRIiAN. A, BreHhawpU 1828. Breit. Char., 208, f. Erla, Bazony, its 
locality. A silicate of aluminum, iron, calcium and magnesium, now 
considered a rock. 

BRIiANITB. Variant of erlan. 

BRSBTTTB. A. E, Nordenskiold, 1855, Nord. Fin. Min., 129 (Ers- 
byit), f. Ersby, Finland, its locality. A var. of microcline. 

BRUBBSOITB. /. D. Dana, 1850, Dana Min., 511, f. erubescere, 
' to grow red,' alluding to its change of color as it tarnishes. A syn. of 
bornite. 

BRnSIBITB. a U. Shepard, 1859, Kept. Mt. Pisgah. 8, f. tpvaifirf, 
* red blight.' because it occurs as a reddish efflorescence. A hydrous iron 
sulphate, of doubtful character. 

ERTTHRINB. See erythrite. 

ERYTHRITB. F. 8, Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 596 (Erythrine), 
f. e/jvOfjoS, 'red.' Hydrous arsenate of cobalt, occurring in crimson 
crystals aud plates. 

Also used by T. Thomson, 1843, Pbil. Mag., 3d, xxii, 188. A flesh- 
red var. of feldspar. 

BRTTHROCONITB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 59, f. epvBpoi, 

'red,' and kovhx, * powder,* because it affords a red powder. An obs. 
syn. of tciinantite. 

BRYTHROSIDERITB. A. Scacchi, 1872, Nap. Ac. Rend., 210 
(Eritrosidero), f. e/jv^poS, * red,' and aidr/po^, * iron,* alluding to its com- 
position and color. A chloiide of iron and potassium, of red color, 
closely related to kremersite. 

ERTTHROS^INCITB. A. Damour, 1880. Bull. Soc. Min., iii. 156, f. 
epvQpui, ' red,' and zinc. A red sulphide of zinc and manganese, found 
in thin plates. 

ESCHERITE. Th. Scheerer, 1855, Pogg. Ann., xcv, 507 (Escherit), 
after E. Stockar-Escher, who had made a special study of epidote. A 
syn. of epidote. 

BSCHINITB. Variant of seschynitc. 

BSCHWBaiTB. /. W. Dobfreiner, 1823, Ann. de Phys., Ixxiii, 111, 
(Eschwegit), after Baron W. L. v. Eschwege, who described it. An im- 
pure hematite from Brazil. 

BSCHTNTTE. Variant of seschynite. 

BSMARKTTB. J. F. L, Hausmann, 1818, Haus. Min., 862 



SSSONITB 89 BnCOLITB 

(Esmarkit), after Prof. J. Esmark, who discovered it. An obs. syn. of 
datolite. 

Also used by A, Brdmann, 1840, Vet. Ak. Stock., 188. A var. of 
fublunite. 

SSSONITB. R, J, Hauy, 1817, HaUy Pier., 60, f. ^aaoov. * inferior, 
becuuse it possesses in an inferior degree the characters of similar minerals. 
A syn. of cinnamon-stone. The more correctly derived form, bessoiiite, 
has been sometimes used, first by K. C. v. Leonhard, 1821, Leon. Orykt., 
438. 

STHIOPSITB. Adam, 1869. Adam. Tab., 59, f. Ethiops min- 
eral, the old name for black sulphide of mercury, an artificial com- 
pound. A doubtful black sulphide of mercury. 

BTTRINaiTB. J, Lehmann, 1874. Jahrb. Min., 278 (Ettringit). f. 
Ettriugen. Germany, its locality. A hydrous sulphate of calcium and 
aluminum, in needle-shaped crystals. 

BUOAIRITB. /. J. Berzelius, 1818, Afh. i Fis., vi. 42 (Euknirit), f. 
evKatpoi, 'opportunely,* because found soon after the discovery of 
selenium. Selenide of silver and copper, found in soft, lead-gray 
masses. 

BUOABffPTITB. Variant of cukamptite. 

BUCHLORE-MIOA. F. Molis, 1820, Mohs Char. 20, f. evx^oapo^;, 
' pale green,' and mica. An obs. syn. of chalcophyllite. 

BUOHLORTTB. C. U. Shepard, 1876, Shep. Cout. Min.. 2, f. ev, 
and chlorite. A var. of biotite resembling chlorite. 

Also used by E. Scacehit 1884. Nap. Ac. Rend., xxiii, 158 (Euclorina). 
f. evx^oapo^i 'pale green,' alluding to its color. Sulphate of copper, 
potassium and sodium, found at Vesuvius. 

BUCHIiOROSB. E. J, Chapman, 1843, Chap. Min., 35, f. evx^a^poi, 
* pale green.' An obs. syn. of chalcophyllite. 

BUOHROITB. A. Breithaupt, 1828, Breit. Char.. 266 (Euchroit). f. 
evxpota, * well-colored,* alluding to its beautiful color. Hydrous arsenate 
of copper, of a bright, emerald-green color. 

BUCHTSroBRITB. H, J. Brooke, 1823, Brooke Cryst.. 465, prob- 
ably f. €v and x^^^* ' to melt easily, ' and aiSr/fjoi, • iron,' because a very 
fusible mineral containing iron. An obs. syn. of hcdeiibergite. 

BUOLASB. R. J. ffafip, 1792, Jour, de Phys., xli, 155, f. ev and 
KXdv, ' to break well.' alluding to its very easy cleavage. Silicate of 
glncinum and aluminum, found in brilliant, transparent crystals. 

BUOOUTB. Th. Scheerer, 1847, Pogg. Ann.. Ixxii. 561 (Eukolit). f. 



finOOUTB-TITANITB 00 BnPHTI«X«ITB 

evtcoXoi, * easily satisfied/ because it contents itself with iron oxide in the 
place of zirconia. A var. of eudialyte. 

EnCOLITB-TITANrrS. Th. Scheerer, 1853, Berg. Hat., vii, 889 
(Eukolit-Titanit). A var. of titauite much resenibliug eucolite. 

BUCRASITE. 8. R. PaijkuU, 1877, Geol. FOr. Fftrh.. iil, 850 
(Euknisit), f. ev aud KfniaiS, 'well mixed/ on account of its complex 
composition. Hydrous silicate of thorium aud other bases, not far from 
thorite. 

BUORYPTITB. O. J. BruBh and E. 8. Dana, 1880, A. J. 8., 8d, xx, 
26C, f. ev and KpvnrdSf 'well concealed,' alluding to its mode of occurs 
rence. Silicate of aluminum aud lithium, occurring in albite. 

BUDIALYTB. Fr. 8trome3/er, 1819, Gfttt. Ges. Auz., 1998 (Eudi- 
alyt), f. evSmlXvTo^f 'easy to undo,' on account of its easy solubility in 
acids. A crimson or brownish-red silicate of zirconium aud sodium. 

EUDIDYMITB. W. C. Brogger, 1887, Mag. Nat., xxxi 196 (Eu. 
didymit), f. €v, 'well,' and 8i8vino%, 'twin/ because it always occurs in 
twiu crystals. A silicate of glucinum and sodium. 

EUDNOPHITB. P. C. Weibye, 1850, Pogg. Ann., Ixxix, 808 (Eud- 
nophit), f. ev, and <$i'o0a?, 'darkness,' alluding to the cloudiness of the 
mineral. Hydrous silicate of aluminum and sodium. 

BUOBNESITB. J. K. L. Zincken, 1842, Berg. HQt., i, 400 (Eugen- 
esit), f. evyevy)^, 'noble,' because it contains three noble metals, palla- 
dium, silver and gold. A var. of palladium, containing some selenium. 

EUEAMPnTB. A. Kenngott, 1855, Keung. Ueb. for 1853, 58 
(Eukamptit), f. evKamtro^, 'flexible,' which is characteristic of the min- 
eral. A hydrous biotite of black color. 

BULEBRITB. Error for culebrite. 

BULYTINB. A, Breithaupt. 1827. Pogg. Ann., ix, 275 (Eulytin), 
f. eL;Ai;ro5, 'easily dissolved,' because of its fusibility. Silicate of 
bismuth in minute, grayish or brown crystals. 

BULYTTTB. Variant of eulytine. 

EUMANITB. a U. Shepard, 1851, Am. Assoc., iv. 817, f. ev, and 
uavo?, 'very rare.' Minute crystals of a dark brown color, which are 
probably the same as brookite. 

BUNOPHTTB. Variant of eudnophite. 

BUOSBAITB. a W. O umbel, 1864, Jahrb. Min., 10 (Euosmit), f. ev, 
and 6(Tuii 'odor/ on account of its pleasant odor. A fossil resin of a 
brownish -yellow color. 

EUPHTLUTB. B aoiiman, Jr., 1849. A. J. 8., 2d, rUi, 888. f. 



BUPYROHROITB 91 FAOBLUTE 

ev, and <puXXov, *a leaf/ alluding to its foliated structure. Hydrous 
silicate of aluminum, potassium and sodium, found iu pearly-while luminoe. 

SUPTROHROITB. E. Emmons, 1838. Geol. Surv. N. Y., 252. f. 
€v, 'well/ iivp, 'fire/ and ;f/oo/a, 'color/ iu allusion to its beautiful 
phosphorescence when heated. A var. of apatite, found in sub-fibrous, 
concretionary forms. 

BURALITB. F, J, Wiik, 1869, Jahrb. Min., 857 (Euralit), f. Eum. 
Finland, its locality, and A/Oo?. A chloritic mineral near delcssite. 

SUSTNCHTTB. U. Fischer and /. Nessler [1854, Ber. Ubcr Vcrh. 
der Gesells. fQr Nat. Wiss. Freib. im Breisgau, No. 3, 83], 1855. Jahrb. 
Min., 570 (Eusynchit), f. eu, 'easy,' and auyx^^^f *^^ confound,' because 
it may easily be mistaken for pyromorphite. A var. of dcchenite 
containing zinc. 

BXTTHALITB. K M. Th, Esmark, 1874. Des CI. Min., ii, (1). p. 
xzxix, f. ev, 'well,' and BaXXoS, *a green twig/ alluding to its color. 
A var. of analcite, found in greenish nodules. 

BUXBNITS. Th. Bcheerer, 1840. Pogg. Ann., 1. 149 (Euxenit), f. 
ev^evoi, 'friendly to strangers,' because it contains so many rare ingredi- 
ents. A columbo-tantalate of yttrium, found in brilliant, black crystals. 

SUZBOUTS. A. Breithaupt, 1818, Hoflf. Min., iv, (2), 40 (Euzeo- 
lith). f. 6u, and zeolith, that is, a beautiful zeolite. An obs. syn. of 
heulandite. 

EVANSITE. D. F<yrhts, 1864, Phil. Mag., 4th, xxviii, 341, after 
Brooke Evans, who brought it from Hungary. Hydrous phosphate of 
aluminum, found in white, reniform masses. 

BVIOTOKITB. IF. FlighU 1883. Jour. Ch. Soc, xliii, 141, f. 
Evigtok (Ivigtuk), Greenland, its locality. Fluoride of calcium and 
aluminum, perhaps the same as gearksutite. 

BZANTHAI.08B. F, 8. BeudanU 1882, Beud. Min., ii, 475, f. 
i^arBelv.. *to efflore^e,' and aA?, 'salt.' A white sulphate of sodium, 
produced by the efflorescence of glauber's salt. 

BZITBLB. F. 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 615, f. eqirrfXai, 
' vaporizable,' because very easily vaporized by heat. An obs. syn. of 
valentinite. 

BXTTBLITB. Variant of exitele. 

BTB-OF-THB- WORLD. An early popular name for opal. 
BTTIiANDITB. P. Waage, 1869. Adam Tab., 31, f. Eytland. 
Norway, its locality. An obs. syn. of samarskite. 
FAOBIjLITB. See phacellite. 



03 FAUJASTTB 

FAHLBRZ. From fahl, * dun-colored/ and erz, ' ore/ The old Ger- 
man name for tetrahedrite. 

FAHLITB. Variant of fahlerz. 

FAHIi ORB. Partial translation of fahlerz, used hy early writers. 

FAHLUNITB. IF. HUinger, 1808. His. Min. Geog., 22 (Fahlunit). 
f. Fahliin. Sweden, iia locality. Hydrous silicate of aluminum and iron, 
resuliiug from the alteration of iolite. 

FAIRFIELDITB. O. J. Brush and B. 8. Dana, 1879. A. J. 8., 8d, 
xvii, 859, f. Fairfield Co., Conn., its locality. Hydrous phosphate of 
calcium, manganese and iron, found in white or yellow, foliated masses. 

FALKBNHATNITS. R, Schariser, 1890. Geol. Reich. Verh., 298 
(Falkenhaynit), in honor of Count J. Falkeubayn. A somewhat doubt- 
ful sulph-antimonide of copper, resembling galenite in appearance. 

FALSE AMETHYST. An early name for violet-colored fluorite 
when cut as a gem. Other colors of the same mineral were called false 
emerald, ruby, sapphire or topaz. 

FALSE TOPAZ. An early name for yellow transparent quartz. 
Yellow lluor was also so ciilled when cut as a gem. 

FALUNITE. Variant of fahlunile. 

FAMATINTTE. A. W. SteUner, 1873, Min. Mitth.. 242(Famatinit), 
f. Famatina Mts., Argentine Hep., its locality. A sulph-antimonide of 
copper related to euargite. 

FARQITE. if. F. Heddle, 1857. Phil. Mag., 4th, xiii, 50, f. Glen 
Farg, Scotland, its locality. A syu. of natrolile. 

FAROELTTE. M. F. Heddle, 1857, Phil. Mag., 4th, xiii, 60, f. the 
FarOe Isl., its locality. A syn. of mesolc. 

FASOIOULTTE. B, Hitchcock, 1823, A. J. S.. vi, 226. f. fasciculus, 
'a small bundle,' alluding to its fascicular structure. Tufted, fibrous 
hornblende, found in mica schist. 

FASSAITE. D. O. Doloniieu, 1811, Mem. Fassa, p. xi (Fassoite), f. 
Fassa, Piedmont, its locality. An obs. name for a zeolitic mineral not 
now identified. It was generally classed with stilbite. 

Also used by -4. O. Werner, 1817, Hoff. Min., iv. 2 (Fassait). An 
aluminous var. of pyroxene, found in deep green crystals. 

FASSOITE. See fassaite. 

FAUJASITE. A. Damour, 1842, Ann. des M., 4th, i, 895. after 
F^ujas de St. Fond, who had written on ancient volcanoes. Hydrous 
silicate of aluminum, calcium and sodium, found in colorless or white 
octahedral crystals in old lavas. 



FAUSBBITB 98 FBRROOOBALTINB 

FAUSBRrrZI. A, Breithaupt, 1^65. Berg. Httt., xxiv. 801 (Fauserit), 
in honor of Joseph Fauser, of Pesth. Sulphate of manganese and mag- 
nesiom, occurring in yellowish or reddish-white, transparent crystals. 

FATAIJTB. /. F, Qmelin, 1840, Pogg. Ann., li, 160 (Fayalit), f. 
Fayal, Azores, its locality. Silicate of iron, forming crystalline nodules; 
an iron chrysolite. 

FBATHBR-ALUM. M, H, Klafnoth, 1802. Elap. Beit., iii, 103 
(Federalaun). which refers to its appearance and composition. A syn. 

of halotrichite. 

FBATHER-ORB. From Federerz, an early German name under 
which were included fibrous stibnite and jamesonite. but now used only 
for the latter. 

FBATHBR-ZBOUTE. An erroneous translation of Faserzcolith. 
an early name for a var. of natrolite. 

FBIiDSPAR. J, O. Wallsrius, 1747, Wall. Min.. 65 (Felt-Spat). 
' field-spar. ' A syn. of orthoclasc, but now more usually used as a group 
Dame. 

FELSOBANYTB. W. Haidinger, 1852, K. Ak. Wien, xli, 183 
(Felsobanyt). f. Felsobanya, Huugary, its locality. An orthorhombic 
sulphate of aluminum, found in white or yellowish concretions. E. 8. 
Dana, 1892, Dana Min.. 971, spells it felsobnnyite. 

FBLSPAR. Variant of feldspar, used first by R. Kirwan, 1794, Kirw. 
Min., i, 817. 

FBRBBRTTB. A, Breithaupt, 1863, Jahrb. Min.. 641 (Ferbent), in 
honor of Rudolph Ferber. Tungstate of iron, found in black, granular 
masses. 

FBRaUSONITB. W. ffaidinger, 1827 (read 1825). Roy. Soc. Ed., 
X, (2). 271, in honor of Robt. Ferguson, of Raith. Columbate of iron, 
occurring in brownish-black crystals and massive. 

FBRRICALOITB. R. Kirwan, 1794. Kirw. Min., i, 110. f. ferrum 
and calx, calcis, because it was first supposed to be essentially a calx or 
oxide of iron. An obs. syn. of cerite. 

FBRRTTB. H. Vogelsang, 1872, Zt. Geol.. xxiv, 529, f. ferrum, 
'iron/ The amorphous, hydrous iron oxide, found in many rocks, 
its exact composition not known. 

FBRROOALOITB. J. D. Dana, 186b. Dana Min.. 678. f. its com- 
position. A var. of calcite, containing carbonate of iron, and turning 
brown on exposure. 

FBRROOOBALTINB. See ferrocobaltite. 



PSRROCOBALTmi 94 FBTTBOI* 

FBRROCOBALTTTB. /. D, Dana, 1854, Dana Min., 58 (Fcrro- 
cobaltine), f. its composition. A var. of cobaltite, coDtaiuing iroD. 

FSRROCOLUMBITE. C. U. Shepard, 1844, Sbep. Min., 154, f. its 

composition. An obs. sjn. of tautalite. tantnlic acid baviug been mis- 
taken for coluinbic acid. 

FERROQOSIiARITE. //. A, Wlieeler, 1891, A. J. 8., 8d, xli, 212, 
f. its composition. A var. of goslarite, containing ferrous sulphate. 

FERROILMSNITS. 11 Hermann, 1870, Jour. Pk. Cb.. 2d, ii, 118 
(Ferro-ilmenit), f. its composition, in the idea that it had been shown to 
have a diilerent tlieoreliail formula from columbite. A var. of columbiie. 

FERRONATRITE. /. B. Mackintosh, 1889, A. J. S., 8d, xxxviii, 
244, f. its composition. Hydrous sulphate of iron and sodium, found in 
stellate groups like wavellite. 

FERROSILICINE. See ferrosilicite. 

FERROSUJCITE. C. U. Shepnrd, 1859, A. J. 8., 2d, xxviii, 259 
(Ferrosiliciue), f. its composition. A supposed silicate of iron, found in 
meteorites. 

FERROSTIBIAN. L, J, Igehtrdm, 1889, Geol. Fftr. Fftrh., xi, 389, 
f. itj) composition. Hydrous antimonate of iron and manganese, found 
in black crystals in rhodonite. 

FERROTANTAUTB. T. Thomson, 1836. Rec. Gen. Sci., iv. 416, 
f. its composition. An obs. syn. of tantalite. 

FERROTELLURITB. F. A. Genth, 1877, Am. Phil. 8oc., xvii, 
119, f. its composition. An obscure mineral, found as a crystalline coat- 
ing on quartz, and containing iron and tellurium. 

FERROTITANITE. J. D. Whitney, 1849, A. J. 8., 2d, vii, 484, f. 
its composition. An obs. syn. of schorlomite. 

FBRROTUNaSTBN. JZ Tamm, 1872, Chem. News, xxvi, 18 
(Ferrotuugstene), f. its composition. A mixture of tungsten and iron, 
not fully analyzed, perhaps au artificial product. 

FERROWOLFRAMITB. A. Breithaupt, 1847, Breit. Handb.. iii, 
868 (Ferrowolframit), f. its composition. An obs. name for the var. of 
wolframite which contains the largest per cent of iron. 

Also used by A. Weisbach, 1875, Weis. Syn., 43, as a syn. of ferberite. 

FBRROZINOITB. — ^ Adam, 1869, Adam Tab.. 78, f. its compo- 
sition. An obs. syn. of franklinite. 

FETTBOL. J. K. Freiesleben, 1832, Mng. Orykt.. v. 186, f. fett, * fat; 
and bol, * bole,' alluding to its appearance. An obs. syn. of chloropal. 



FBUaASITB 05 FISCHERTTS 

FBUOASITB. Error for faujasite. 

Variant of fibrolite. 

n. Hose, 1838, Pogg. Ann., xxvii, 309 (Fibro- 
ferrit), f. flbra and ferrum, because a fibrous compound of iron. Ferric 
sulphate, found in fibrous crusts and masses. 

FIBROLITS. /. L, Bournon, 1802, Pbil. Trans.. 289, f. fibra. al- 
luding to its structure, and XiOoS, Silicate of aluminum, usually found 
in fibrous masses. 

PIOHTBUTB. /. a Brameu, 1841, Ann. Ch. Pharm., xxxvii, 804 
(Fichtelit), f. the Ficbtelgebirge, Bavaria, its locality. A mineral resin, 
occurring in white, crystalline scales on fossil pine wood. 

FIOINITB. /. /. Bernhardi [1827, WOrt. Natur., iv, 574], 1828, 
Hart. Handw5rt., 578 (Ficinit), after Prof. H. D. A. Ficlnus, its first 
analyst. A hydrous phosphate of iron and manganese, probably an alter- 
ation product. 

FIBDI.ERITB. O, vom Bath, 1887, Nied. Ges. Bonn, Sitz., 149 

(Fiedlerit), after Fiedler, Mine Director of Laurium, Greece. A 

chloride or oxy-chloride of lead, found in small, tabular crystals. 

FIBIiDITE. A. Kenngoti, 1855, Eenng. Ueb. for 1858, 126 (Fieldit), 
after F. Field, who first analyzed it. An impure var. of tetrahedrite. 

FiaURE-STONB. M, H, Klaproth, 1797, Elap. Beit., ii, 184 (Bild- 
stein), because used for making images. An obs. syn. of agalmatolite. 

FILLOWrm. Q. J. Brush and E. 8. Dana, 1879, A. J. 8., 8d, xvii, 
863, after A. N. Fillow, of Branchville, Ct. , where it was found. Phos- 
phate of manganese, iron, calcium and sodium, occurring in transparent, 
yellow or brown crystals. 

FIORITB. TF. Thompson, 1796, Chem. Ann., i, 108, f. Santa Flora, 
Italy, its locality. A var. of opal, deposited from springs as a white 
powder. 

FIRBBIiENDB. A, Breiihaupt, 1832, Breit. Char., 285 (Feuer- 
blende), f. its appearance. A syn. of pyrostilpuite. 

FIRB-MAHBLB. A popular name for lumachclle, alluding to its 
brilliant internal reflections. 

FIRB OPAL. M, if. Klaproifi, 1807, Klnp. Beit., iv, 156 (Feuer- 
Opal), f. its appearance. Avar, of opal, showing internal reflections of 
a fire- red color. 

FZ80HBRITB. JR. Hermann, 1844, Jour. Pk. Ch., xxxiii, 285, in 
honor of G. Fischer von Waldheim. A hydrous phosphate of aluminum. 
found in green veins and masses in sandstone. 



FISH-BTS 8TONB 96 FLUOR-APATITB 

FISH-STB STONE. A. Q. Werner, 1805. All. Jour. Chem., ▼, 85 
(Fiscbaugeostein), f. tbe older name, icbthyophtbalmite. An oba. syn. 
of apopbyllite. 

FLAVErm. X. Darapeky, 1890, Jabrb. Min., i, 64 (Flaveil), f. 
flavus, ' oraDge-yellow/ in allusioD to its color. One of severul names 
proposed as substitutes f6r copiapite and coquimbite. 

FLEZIBUEI SILVBR ORB. /. L. Bournon, 1817, Bourn. Cat. Roi, 
209 (Argent sulfure flexible), because flexible in thin luminse. A syn. of 
stern bergite. 

FUNETTE. A, Hamherg, 1889, Geol. F5r. F5rb., xi. 212 (Flinkit), 
in honor of Gustav Flink. A hydrous manganese arsenate, near syua- 
delphite. 

FLINT. Derivation uncertain. Perhaps f. ^A/fOo$, 'a brick.' A 
dull grayish or brownish-black variety of quartz, somewhat similar to 
chalcedony. 

FLOATSTONE. An old name for a spongy variety of opal, so 
light and porous that it will float on water. 

FLORIDITB. E, T. Cox, 1891. Am. Assoc., xxxix (for 1890), 960. 
A name suggested for the Florida phosphate rock, used as a fertilizer. 

FLOS-FERRI. J. Hill, 1748, Hill Foss., 844, f. flos. 'a flower,' and 
ferrum, alluding to its mode of occurrence. A var. of aragonite in 
coralloidul forms, often found with iron ore. 

FLUCERINE. F. 8. Beudant, 1882, Beud. Min., ii, 519, f. iU 
composition. A syn. of fluocerite. 

FLUBIiUTE. W. H, WoWiston, 1824, Ann. Phil., 2d. viii. 248. f. 
fluorine and Xffio%, A rare fluoride of aluminum, found in minute white 
crystals. 

FLnOCBRINB. /. F. L. Jlauamann, 1847, Haus. Min., 1447, f. iU 
composition. An obs. syn. of bastnftsite. 

FLUOOERITE. A. Breiihaupt, 1841. Breit. Handb., ii, 812. f. the 
older name, flucerine. Fluoride of cerium, occurring in prisms of a 
dark red or yellow color. 

FliUOCHIiORB. R, Hermann, 1850. Jour. Pk. Ch., 1. 186 (Plao- 
chlor). f. fluor and pyrochlore. A name proposed for the var. of 
pyrocblore which contains fluorine. 

FLUOR. A common syn. of fluorite. 

FLUOR-APATITB. C. F, RammeUberg, 1860, Ramm. Min. Cb.. 
858 (Fluorapatit). Apatite which contains fluorine to the exclusion of 

chlorine. 



FLUORITB 97 FOROHBRTTB 

FLnORrm. O. Agrteola, 1546, Agric, 466 (Fluores), f. fluere, 'to 
flow,' because it melts easily. Fluoride of calcium, occurriDg in crystals 
and masses of various colors. 

FLUOR SPAR. A popular name for fluorite. 

FLUOSIDBRITB. A. ScaceJih 1885, Zt. Eryst., x, 270 (Fluoslderit). 
because supposed to contain fluorine and iron.* A mineral of unknown 
composition, found in reddish crusts with nocerite. 

FI.US8TTTROCALOITE. E. F. Gloeker, 1839, Glock. Min., 664 
(^ussyttrocalcit), f. its composition. An obs. syn. of ytlrocerite. 

PLUS8YTTROOBRITB. E. F. Gloeker, 1831, Glock. Min., 956 
(Fluasyttrocerit), f. its • composition. Probably an impure var. of 
ytlrocerite. 

PLUTHHRITB. A. Weisbaeh, 1875. Weis. Syn.. 48 (Flutherit), f. 
the Fluther vein, Joachimsthal, Bohemia, its locality. A syn. of urano- 
thalite. 

FOAMINa BARTH. R. Jamewn, 1804, Jam. Min., i, 605, f 
Schaumerde, 'earth-foam.' An obs. syn. of aphrite. 

FOLaBRITB. 8, H. Emmeiu, 1892, Am. Ch. Soc. Jour., ziv, 205, 
after Com. W. M. Folger, in recognition of his achievements in the utiliza- 
tion of nickel-steel. A syn. of pentlandite. 

FOLIATBO TBIiLURIUM. F, A, Reuss, 1806, Reuss Min.. iv, 
596 (Blatter-Tellurerz), in allusion to its foliated structure. A 83m. of 
nagyagite. 

FOLIATBD ZBOUTB. /. O. WdUeriuB, 1772, Wall. Min.. i, 818 
(Blftttricher Zeolith). An obs. syn. of both stilbite and heulanditc. 

FONTAINBRIiEAU UMESTONB. An early popular name for 
the well-known crystals from Fontaincbleau, France, which have the form 
of calcite, but contain a large percentage of sand and are therefore often 
called Fontaincbleau sandstone. 

FONTAINBRLBAU 8AND8TONB. See Fontainebleau limedtone. 

FOOTETTB. O. A. Koenig, 1891, Acad. Nat. Sci. Proc, 289, in 
honor of Dr. A. E. Foote, of Philadelphia. Hydrous oxychloride of 
copper, near tallingite. 

FORBBSTTB. A. Kenngott, 1868, Eenng. Ueb. for 1862-65. 46 
(Forbesit), after D. Forbes, who first analyzed it. Hydrous arsenate of 
cobalt and nickel, resulting from the decomposition of chloanthite. 

FOROHBRTTB. 8, Aichhorn [1860, Wienerzeitung Abendblatt, 

July 11] (lorcherit), 1862. Jour. Pk. Ch., Ixxxvi, 501 (Forcherit). after 

Forcher, who discovered it. A var. of opul colored yellow by orpiinent. 



FOROHHAMMSRim 98 FRBIBBRaiTB 

FOROHHAMMERITE. M. F. Heddle, 1883, Encyc. Brit., xvi. 
415, Id honor of J. G. Forclihammer. Hydrous silicate of iron, found in 
dark green mnsscs. 

FORSSITS. O. vom RaVt, 1874, Pogg. Ann., clii. 31 (Foresii). after 
R. Forest, of Portoferajo, Elba, its discoverer. A hydrous silicate of 
aluminum and calcium, found in rrvstalllne scales. 

FORI3STBRITB. Error for forsterile. 

FORSTERrm. A. Levy, 1824, Ann. Phil. 2d, vii, 62, probably 
in honor of Prof. J. R. Forster. Silicate of magnesium, found in yellow 
or greenish crystals and rounded ermins. 

FORTIFICATION-AQATE. See ruin-agate. 

FOUQUEITE. A. tjicroix, 1889. Bull. Soc. Min., xii, 880, in honor 
of Prof. A. Fouque, of Paris. Silicate of aluminum and lime, closely 
allied to cpidote. 

FOURNBTTTB. C%. Mene, 1860, C. R., li, 468. in honor of Prof. 
J. Fournet, of Lyons. A mixtui-e of galeuite and some copper mineral, 
supposed at first to be a var. of tetrnhedrite. 

FOWIiERINE. Variant of fowlerite. 

FOWIiBRITB. C. V. Shepard, 1832, A. J. 8., xxi, 888, in honor of 
Dr. Saml. Fowler. Shepard says, 1857, Shep. Min., 414, that the name 
was given by T. Nuttall and others thirty years earlier. A flesh-red var. 
of rhodonite, containing zinc. 

FRANCEEITE. A, W. Stelzner, 1893, Jahrb. Min., ii, 114 (Francke- 
It), after C. and E. Francke, on account of their intimate connection 
with the recent revival of interest in Bolivian geology. Sulph-antimon- 
ide of tin and lead, containing a very small amount of germanium. 

FRANOOLTTE. H. J. Brooke, 1850, Phil. Mag., 3d. xxxvi, 134. f. 
Huel Franco. Devonshire, where it was found, and XiBos. A var. of 
apatite, found in stalactitic masses. 

FRANELANDITB. J. E. Reynolds, 1877. Phil. Mag.. 5th, iii. 284. 
after E. Frftnkland,*who studied organic boric compounds. A hydrous 
borate of calcium and sodium, ueiir ulexite. 

FRANELINITE. P. Berthier, 1819, Ann. des M., iv, 489, f. Frank- 
lin, N. J., its locality, and also in honor of Benjamin Franklin, after whom 
the place was named. Oxides of iron, manganese and zinc, found in 
brilliant, iron-black crystals. 

FREDRIOITE. U. I^ogren, 1880, Geol. F5r. F5rh.. v. 82 (Fred- 
ricit), f. the Fredrik Shaft. Fain mine. Sweden, where it was found. A 
var. of tennantite, containing lead and tin. 

FREIBERaiTE. A. Kenngott, 1853, Kenng. Min.. 117 (Freil)ergil). 
f. Freiberg, Saxony, ite locality. An argentiferous var. of tetrahedrite 






•< 



FRBIXSSUBBBN 99 FULLONITB 

FRBIESLSBEN. C. E. F. v, Moll, 1804, Moll Jahrb.. iii, 864, after 
J. K. Freiusleben, who flrst uoticcd it. A minenil uever fully described, 
and not now ideutidect. 

FRBIXSSIiEBENITB. W. Haidinger, 1845. Haid. Hnndb.. 569 
(Freiealebenil) after J. K. Freiesleben, who bad earlier named it Schilf- 
Glaserz. tiulpb-antimonide of lead and silver, crystallizing in striated 
prisms. 

FRXINOH OHAIiK. A popular name for talc, when it is soft 
cnougb to be used as chalk. 

FRBNZBLITS. E. S. Dana, 1875, Dana Min., App. ii. 22, after A. 
Frenzel, who had analyzed it. A syn. of guanajuatite. 

FRETAUTE. ff. Eamark, 1878, Bull. Soc Miu. . i, 33, f. Freya. a 
{Scandinavian goddess, and Xido?, A hydrous silicate of thorium and 
cerium, of a brown color and resinous lusti*e, found in Norway. 

FRIEDEIirrXI. E, Berirand, 1876. C. U.. Ixxxii, 1167, in honor of 
Ch. Friedel. A rose-red hydrous silicate of manganese. 

PRIBSBITB. a Vrba, 1878, Zt. Kryst., ii. 153 (Frieseit), after 
F. M. V. Friese, from whom Vrba received it. A var. of sternbergite, 
occuning in tabular, brown crystals. 

FRiarorrE. a, d'AcMardi, 1881, Soc. Tosc. Atti, 171, f. the Frigido 
▼alley, Apuan Alps, its locality. A var. of tetrahedrite containing 
Dicl^el. 

FRI8BITB. Error for frieseite. 

FRTTZSOHEITB. A. Breithaupt, 1865,^ Berg. HUt., xxiv. 303 
(Fritzscheit), in honor of Prof. C. J. Fritzsche. A red uranium mineral, 
occurring in four-sided tabular crystals resembling autunite. 

FRUaARDmi. N. Nordenskiold, 1820, Nord. Bidrag., i. 80 
(Frugardit). f. Fnigard, Finland, its locality. A magnesian var. of 
▼esuvianite. 

FUOHBRTTB. A, Leymerie, 1867, Ley. Min., ii, 840, f. Fouclieres, 
France, its locality. An earthy mixture of phosphate and peroxide of 
iron , of an ochre-yellow color. 

FUOJ^SITE. a E, Schafhdutl, 1842. Ann. Ch. Pharm.. xliv. 40 
(Fuchsit), in honor of Dr. J. N. Fuchs. A var. of muscovite containing 
4-hromiunL 

FUOrPE. Error for fuscite. 

FUIiliBRS' BARTH. An early name for clay of various kinds, 
usaally kaolin, employed by fullers to cleanse their cloth from grease. 

FUIiZiONITB. Probably named after Mr. Fullon, brother-in-law of 
Mr. Armstrong who found it. A syn. of onegite. 



• . - 



' •# . I 



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• • • - 



FUNKmi 100 aAIiBNOOBRATTTB 

FUNKITB. A. Dufrenoy, 1847. Duf. Min., iii, 761 (no derivaUon 
given). An obs. syn. of coccolite. 

FUSOITB. J, O, Lem [1796, Lenz Handb.], ISOl, Sebum. Min., 
104 (Fuscit), f. fiiscus, 'tawny,* in allusion to its yellowish-brown color. 
An obs. syn. of wenierite. 

QABBRONITB. C, F. Schumacher, 1801, Sebum. Min.. 28 (Onb- 
bronit), named from the rock gabbro. wbicb it greatly resembles. A 
syn. of sea polite. 

OABRONITS. Error for gabbronite. 

QADOLINITZ]. M, 11. KlaproUi, 1802. Klap. Beit., iii. 52 (Gado- 
Unit), after J. Gadolin, the discoverer of yttrium. Silieate of yttrium, 
oecurriug in black crystals, and also massive. 

a^BHARDITXI. A, Dufrenoy, 1847. Duf. Min.. iii. 761 (no deri- 
vation given). An obs. syn. of fuchsite. 

QAHNm]. C. E. F. V. Moll, 1807. Moll Jahrb. Efem.. iii. 7S 
(Gabnit). after J. G. Gabn. its discoverer. Oxide of sine and aluminum, 
found in dark-green octabedral crystals. 

Also used by Lobo da Silveira, 1810, Afh. i Fis.. iii. 276 (Gahnit). 
An obs. syn. of vesuvianite. 

QALAOTITB. W. Haidinger, 1854, E. Ak. Wien. xii, 290 (Galaktit), 
(from a label in the E. E. Hof. Min. Eabiuet), f. ydka, yakaKro^^ 
* milk.' referring to its color. An obs. name for natrolite. 

Used earlier by C, U. 8/tepard, 1832, Shcp. Min.. 244, for a mineral 
not now identified, but probably the same as the one noticed by Haidioger. 

QAIiADSITS. \ 

OALADSTTm. V Errors for galaktite. 

GALADTITB. ) 

GALAPEETTTS. A, BreiViaupU 1882. Breit. Char.. 99 (Galapek- 
tit). f. rtkM<r, ' milk,' and nrfKroS, 'congealed.' referring to its appearance. 
A bard, cream-colored var. of balloysite. 

QAIiBNA. See galenite. 

OAIiSNITE. From galena. ' lead ore,' tbe nbme used by Pliny^ 
77. Bk. xxxiii. 81. Lead sulphide, occurring in brilliant, cubical crystals^ 
and massive. 

aALBNOBISBAUTITB. JZ ^ogren, 1878, Geol. FOr. FOrli.. iv, 
109 (Galenobismutit), f. yixXj'ivrf, * lead,' and bismuth, alluding to its com- 
position. Sulphide of lead and bismuth, occurring in brilliant, metallic, 
tin-white masses. 

QAIiBNOCBRATITB. E. F, Qlocher, 1847, Glock. Syn., 248 (Ga- 
lenoceratit), f. yctXijvr^, 'lead.' and /cep^S, -aro5. 'a horn.' An oba. 
syn. of phosgenite. which is often called horu-Iead. 



GAIXXOINITE 101 OASTAIjDmi 

aAlilJCINITB. Variant of gallizinite. 

QAIiUTZINrrS. «/; O. Lem, 1801, Oall. Rec.. 269, in honor of 
D. du Galiitzin. An obs. syn. of rutile. 

aALUZINrm. F. S. BeudanU 1824, Bend. Min., 446, f. J. G. 
Wallerius' earlier form, Giilizensten, 'stone from Gallicia.' 1747, Wall. 
Miu., 157. An obs. syu. of goslarite. 

aAMSIGRADITS. A. Breithaupt, 1861, Berg. HQt., xx, 51 (Gam 
sigradit), f. Gamsigrad, Servia, its locality. A velvet-black var of 
amphibole, containing manganese. 

GANOBCAUTB. A, E, NarcUnskiold, 1876, Geol. F5r. FOrh., iii, 
121 (Gkinomalit), f. yccvoo/ia, * lustre,' and XiBoi, Silicate of lead and 
manganese, with splendent lustre. 

Also as an error for ganomatite. 

QANOMATITB. A, Breithaupt, 1882, Breit. Char., 106 (Gano. 
matit), f. xdyao/ia, 'brilliance,' alluding to its lustre. An impure iron 
sinter, also called chenocoprolite. 

aANOPHTUJTB. A. Hamberg, 1800, Geol. FOr. FOrh.. zii, 586, 
f. ydvoS, * lustre,' and ipuXXov, 'a leaf,' alluding to the high lustre of its 
cleavage laminte. Hydrous silicate of manganese and aluminum, found 
in short, brown crystals. 

GAPTTB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 65, f. the Gap mine, Pa., 

its locality. A syn. of morenosite. 

OARBTITB. W. Semmons, 1884, Min. Mag., v, p. xzvi, in honor 
of John Garby, a personal friend. A syn. of enargite. 

QARNBT. Ad early name, f. granatum, 'a pomegranate,' the seeds 
of which it was thought to resemble. A silicate of aluminum with other 
bases, the name now including several sub-species, one of which is a well- 
known gem. 

QARNBT BliBNDB. F. Mohs, 1820, Mohs Char., 92 (Granat- 
Blende), alluding to the resemblance of its crystals to garnet. An obs. 
syn. of sphalerite, commonly called blende. 

OARNBTITB. Variant of garnet. 

QARNXBRITB. W. B. Clarke, 1874, Sidney Morning Herald, Sept. 
80th, after Jules Gamier, its discoverer. A hydrous magnesium silicate 
impregnated with nickel ; perhaps a var. of genthite. 

GARNSDORFTTB. H. J. Brooks and W. H, Miller, 1852. B. and 
M. Min. , 544, f. Garnsdorff, Thuriugia, its locality. A syn. of pissopha- 
nite. 

aA8TAU)ITB. J, Struver, 1875, Accad. Line, 2d, ii, 888. in honor 
of Prof. B. Gkutaldi. A silicate of aluminum, iron, sodium and mague- 
tium. closely related to glaucophane. 



OAT-LUSSmi 102 aBOMTRIOFTB 

QAY-LUSSITE. /. B, BoussinffauU, 1826, Ann. Cb. Phys., xxxi. 
270, in honor of Prof. L. J. Gay-Lussac. The double carbonate of cal- 
cium and sodium, found in wbite or yellowish crystals in saline de- 
posits. 

GBARHSUnTE. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 130, f. r'/. * earth,' 
and nrksutite, which it resembles in composition, while it bus an earthy 
aspect. Hydrous fluoride of calcium and sodium, lookinj^ like clay. 

GBDANITS. 0. Helm, 1878, Nat. Ges. Duuz. Scbrift., iv, (8), 214 
(Gedanit). f. Gedunum. the old Latin name for Danzig, nenr which place 
it was found. A fossil resin resembling amber, but not containing 
succinic acid. 

GBDRTTS. A. Dvfrenoy, 1836, Ann. des M., 8<1, x, 582, f. Gedres. 
France, its locality. A mineral similar to anthophyllite in optical prop- 
erties, and therefore classed with it, though differing in composition. 

QEHLENITB. /. N, Fuc?is, 1815, Jour. Ch. Ph., xv, 877 (Gehlenlt), 
in honor o' Dr. A. F. Gehlen. A silicate of aluminum and calcium, 
occurring usually in short, square, prismatic crystals, of grayish-green to 
brown color. 

GSIERITE. A. Breithaupt, 1866, Berg. HUt., xxv, 167 (Geierit), f. 
Geyer, Saxony, its locality. A syn. of lOlingite. 

GETKTTHJTE. A. Dick, 1893 (x^d 1892), Min. Mag., x, 145» in 
honor of Sir Archibald Geikie, and XiBo%, Titanate of magnesium, 
found in pebbles. 

GBNTHTTB. /. D. Dana. 1867. A. J. S., 2d, xliv. 256, after Prof. 
F. A. Gcnth, who first described it. Hydrous silicate of nickel and 
magnesium, found as an apple-green incrustation, and in amorphous masses. 

GBOCERBLIiITE. J, D, Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 748, f. Geocerin- 
sfture, its earlier name, and XiBoi, An acid hydrocarbon, separated 
from brown coal by alcohol. 

GEOOBRITE. J, D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 738, f. Geocerain of 
Z. Bruckner, 1852, Jour. Pk. Ch., Ivii, 14, f. yTf, 'earth,' and tCTfpdi, 
'wax.' A wax-like hydrocarbon, separated from brown coal in white, 
foliated masses. 

GEOCRONITB. L. F, Smnberg, 1889. Berz. Jahrb., xx, 208 
(Geokronit), f. ypf, 'earth,' and tc/jovo?, * Saturn,* the alchemistic names 
of antimony and lead. An orthorhombic sulphide of lead and antimony, 
dark gray in color, and crumbling easily in the fingers. 

GEOMTRICITB. L. Bruckner, 1852. Jour. Pk. Ch., Ivii, 10 (Geo- 
myricin), f. y^, * earth,- and myrica, the name of the species of tree sup- 
posed to have afforded the wax. One of the wax-like hydrocarbons 
obtained from brown coal. 



aURHARDTITX] 103 aiNILSTTB 

aBRHARDTrm. H, L. Wells and 8. L. Penfield, 1885, A. J. S.. 
8d, XXX, 50, after Prof. C. F. Gerhardt, who first studied the correspond- 
ing artificial salt. Basic nitrate of copper, occurriug in small, dark 
green crystals. 

GBRMARmi. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 5, probably in honor 

of Prof. E. F. Gerraar. A syn. of hypersthene. 

aURSDORFFITX]. A. Lowe, 1845, Haid. Handb.. 561 (Gersdorfi^t), 
after the Hofrath von Gtersdorff, from whom the mineral was received. 
Sulph- arsenide of nickel and iron. 

OBTERTTB. Variant of geierite. Sec also geyserite. 

QBTSBRITB. /. C. Delametherie, 1812, Delam. Min., ii. 21 (Geyerit). 
f. Geyser, Iceland, its locality. A var. of opal, of concretionary char- 
acter, deposited from geysers. 

aiBBSITB. J, Tarrey, 1822, Med. Phys. Jour., i, 68, in honor of 
Cu\. George Gibbs. Hydrate of aluminum, found in stalactitic forms 
and incrustations. 

OIBSTTB. Error for gibbsite. 

aiBSONITE. A. Dufrenoy, 1847. Duf. Min.. iii, 761. The name 
applied to a mineral of a pale reddish color, and resembling prehnite. No 
derivation or analysis given ; perhaps an error for gibbsite. 

aiBSBCKITB. T. Allan, 1813, Ann. Phil., ii, 390. after Sir Charles 
Giesecke, who brought it from Greenland. A var. of pinite, thought to 
be a pseud omorph after nephelite. 

OIOANTHOLTTB. Variant of gigantolite. 

aiaANTOIiITE. P. A, V, Bomdorf, 1833. Glock. Jahres.. i. 148 
(Gigantolith), f. yiy^x^, -avroi, 'giant,' alluding to the great size of 
some of its crystals, and Xi^o^i. A greenish-gray mineral, occurriug in 
six- or twelve-sided prisms, pscudomorphous after iolite. 

aiLBBRTTTB. T. Thomson, 1835, Shep. Min., i. 228. in honor of 
Davies Gilbert, Pres. of the Royal Society. A silky, micaceous mineral, 
closely allied to kaolinite. 

aXXiLBBAOKITB. N. Nordenskidld, 1849, Nord. Atom. Ch. Min. 
Syst., 96 (Gillebftckit), f. Gjellebttk, Norway, its locality. A var. of 
wollastonite. resembling tremolite. 

aniUNaiTB. W, nislnger, 1826, W6hl. His., 102 (Gillingit), f. the 
Gillinge mine, Sweden, its locality. Hydrous silicate of iron, found in 
amorphous black masses. 

OIIiSONITB. A local and trade name, after S. H. Gilson, the owner 
of the deposit. The first name applied to the asphalt-like mineral now 
known as uintahite. 

aiNIItSITB. a F. BammeUberg, 1875, Ramm. Min. Chem., ii. 704, 



OIOBUKTITJU 104 aZiAUBAFATITB 

f. the Ginils Alps, Switzerland, its locality. A doubtful silicate of 
calcium aud iron, found in masses of a grayish-yellow color. 

aiOBERTTTE. F, 8. Beudant, 1824, Beud. Min., 410, after Prof. 
G. A. Giobert, who had examined it. A syn. of magnesite. 

OIPSITII. Error for gibbsite. 

QIRASOL. From girare, 'to turn,' and sol, 'the sun,' because it 
gives brilliant reflections when moved in sunlight. A bluish-white var. 
of opal, which gives red reflections in a bright light. 

OISECEmi. Error for gieseckite. 

aiSMONDINE. Bee gismondite. 

aiSMONDITE. K. C. v. Leoritiard, 1817, Tasch. Min., ii, 168 
(Gismondin), after Prof. C. G. Gismondi, who first described it. Hydrous 
silicate of aluminum and calcium, found in lava. 

OIUFPITB. /. Kusehel 1877, Jahrb. Min., 926 (Giufflt), f. the Giuf 
valle}', Switzerland, its locality. A name suggested to replace milarite, as 
its locality is Giuf, and not Milar. 

GroFITB. Variant of giufflte. 

OJELLEBEEITI!. Yuriant of gillebOckite. 

GLAQERITI!. A. Breithaupt, 1841, Breit. Handb., ii, 857 (Glagerit). 
f. yXayefjo^, * full of milk,' alluding to its color. A cream-white var. 
of halloysite. 

GLANCE-BLENDI]. F. Mohs, 1820, Mobs Char., 92 (Glanz-Blende), 
f. its lustre. An obs. syn. of nlabanditc. mangtmese-blende. 

aLANCB-COAL. A, G. Werner, 1789. Berg. Jour., i. 880 (Glanz- 
kohle), 'shining coal.' An obs. syn. of anthracite, the name alluding 
to its lustre. 

GLANCE-OOBAIiT. Variant of cobalt-glance. 

GliANCE-COPPBR. Variant of copper-glance. 

GLANCE-SPAR. E. II. G. v. Dechen, 1861. Geog. FOhr., 154 
(Glanzspath), f. its appearance. A mineral similar to andalusite in 
appearance, but of different cleavage. 

GLASBACHTTE. Adam, 1869. Adam Tab.. 52. f. Glasbach, 

Thuringia. its locality. A doubtful selenide of lead. 

GLASERTTE. /. F. L. Ilnuamann, 1847, Hans. Handb., ii. 1187 
(Glazerit), after Christoph Glaser. the early name for the salt having been 
*sal polycbrestum Glaseri.' A syn. of aphthitalite. 

GLASURTTE. A. Knop [1888, Oberrh. Geol. Ver.. 18], 1891. Zt. 
Kryst., xviii. 668 (Glasurit), f. glasur, 'enamel,' alluding to its appearance. 
A brownish-yellow, hydrous silicate of aluminum and iron, occurring as a 
glazed coating in certain cavities in trap. 

GLAUDAPATTTE. C. U. Shepard, 1856. A. J. S., 2d. xxii. 98, t 



OLAUBBRXTB 105 QLOBOSTTB 

glauber salt, and apatite, as it was thought to contain the coustituents of 
both. A mixture, not a simple mineral. 

aZiAUBERrri!. a. Brongniart, 1808, Jour, des M., xxiii, 5, f. 
glauber salt, because sulphate of sodium is one of its constituents. Sul- 
phate of calcium aud sodium, found iu white, gray or brick-red crystals. 

OLAUBBR SALT. Named after J. R. Glauber, who first made it 
artificially, about the middle of the 17th century. Native sulphate of 
sodium, now called mirabilite. 

OLAXJOODOT. A. BreWiaupi and K, F, Plaitner, 1840, Pogg. Ann., 
Ixvii, 127 (Glaukodot), f. ^A^rvK-Js, 'greenish-blue/ for 'blue.' and Sorijp, 
'a giver,' because used in the manufacture of smalt. Sulph -arsenide of 
cobalt and iron, occurring in tin-white octahedrons. 

OLAXJOOUTB. G, Fischer von Waldheim, 1810, John Unt., ii, 82 
(Glaukolith), f. yXavKoi, 'greenish- blue,' in allusion to its color, and 
XBoi. A massive var. of wernerite, of greenish or bluish color. 

aZ«AUCONITB. Oh. Keferstein, 1828, Deutsch. Geogu. Dargest., v, 
510 (Glaukonit), f. yXavKdi, 'greenish-blue,' alluding to its color. Hy- 
drous silicate of iron, potassium and other bases, found iu olive-green, 
earthy masses. 

aLAUCOPHANZ]. J. F. L. Uausmann, 1845, GOtt. Ges. Anz., 125 
(Glaukophan), f. yXavKdi, and (PaiyeaOat, Mo appear blue or gray.' 
A mineral quite near amphibole in form and composition. 

GLAUCOPYRITI]. F v. Sandberger, 1870, Jour. Pk. Ch., 2d, i, 
280 (Glaukopyrit), f. xXavKoi 'gray,' and pyrite, because a gray pyrite. 
A mineral near leucopyrite. 

GLAU008IDBRITB. E. F. Olocker, 1831, Glock. Min., 857 
(Glaukosiderit), f. yXiXVKoS, and <ri5r/fjo9, that is, 'blue iron.' An 
oba. sjm. of vivianite, blue iron ore. 

GLBSSmi. 0. Helm, 1881. Nat. Ges. Danz. Schrift., v, (1-2), 291 
(Glessit), f. glessum, 'amber,* with which it occurs. A fossil resin, 
found with amber on the shores of the Baltic. 

QUMMER. The German name for mica, often used in other 
languages. 

GUNEmi. H. V. Romanofeki, 1847, Min. Ges. St. Pet. Verb., 244 
(Glinkit), in honor of Gen. Glinka, Gk)vernor of the Ural Mines. A pale 
green var. of chrysolite. 

QIjIST. Formerly a popular name for mica, from its glistening 
appearance. 

OLOBOSmi. A. Breithaupt, 1865, Berg. Hat., xxiv, 821 (Globosit), 
f. globus, ' a globe,' from its shape. A fluo-phosphate of iron, found in 
•mall, globular concretions. 



GLOCEBRITI! 106 GOSLARITB 

GLOCEBRm!. C. F. Naumann, 1855, Naum. Min., 254 (Glock- 
erit), after E. F. Glocker, who first described it. Ferric sulphate, of an 
ochre-yellow or brown color, and resinous lustre. 

GLORIEITI]. Error for gliukite. 

OLOSSBCOLITB. G. U. Shepard, 1857, Shep. Min. Supp., p. iii, 
f. xXdoaaa, 'the tongue,* and KoXXar, 'to glue,' because it adheres 
strongly to the tongue. A white, earthy var. of halloysite. 

GliOTTAIilTB. T. Thomson, 1836, Thorn. Min., i, 328, f. Glotta, 
the ancient name of the river Clyde, near which it was found. An obs. 
syn. of edingtonite. 

aiiUCINITB. W. E. Hidden, 1884, A. J. 8., 8d, xxvii, 138, f. its 
composition. A syn. of herderite. 

GMELINITB. D. Brewster, 1825, Ed. Jour. Sci.. ii, 262, in honor 
of Prof. C. A. Gmelin. Hydrous silicate of aluminum, calcium and 
sodium, occurring in colorless, j^ellow or reddish crystals. 

GOKUMITB. T. TJiomson, 1838 (read 1827), Ann. Lj'C. N. Y., iii. 
61, f. GOkum, Fiulund, its locality. An obs. syn. of vesuviauite. 

GOIiD. The native metal as a mineral, usually called native gold. 

GOLD- AMALGAM. R. Schneider, 1848, Jour. Pk. Ch., xliii, 317 
(Goldamalgam). The native amalgam of gold and mercury. 

GOLD-BERTL. An early name for chrysoberyl. 

GOLD-OPAL. E. F. Oloeker, 1847, Qlock. Syn., 131. An obs. 
name for yellow or golden opal. 

GONGTLITB. A. F. Thoreld, 1852, Soc. Sci. Fenn., iii, 825. f. 
yoyyvXoi, 'round,' in allusion to the shapes in which it occurs. A 
yellowish mineral near pinite. 

GONSOGOLITB. 1878, Groth Min. Samm., 258 (Gonsogolith), from 
a label in the collection. According to Dr. F. GrUnling (priv. com.» 
June 15, 1895), probably f. Conzocoli (Canzocoli), near Predazzo, Tyrol, 
its locality. A syn. of pectolite. 

GOOSBBBRRT-GARNBT. The popular name of grossular. 

GOOSB-DUNG ORB. From QanskOtigerz. An early name for 
an impure iron -sinter containing silver, so ca l.d in allusion to its appear- 
ance. Later called chenocoprolite. 

GORDAITB. A. Frenzel, 1890, Min. Mitth., xi, 218 (Gordait), f. 
the Sierra Gorda, Chili, where it occurs. A syn. of ferronatrite. 

GORLANDITB. H. J. Brooke, 1844, Alger Phil., 549, f. Huel 
Gorland, Cornwall, where it was found. An obs. syn. of mimetite. 

GOSHENITB. C. U. 8/iepard, 1844, Shep. Min., i, 143, f. Goshen, 
Mass., its locality. A colorless or white var. of beryl. 

GOSLARTTE. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 490 (Qoslarit), f. 



OOTHTTE 107 ORAPHmTE 

Goslar, in the Harz, its locality. Sulphate of zinc, from the decompo- 
sition of sphalerite. 

GOTHTTB. J, O, Lem, 1806, Lenz Tab., 46 (GOthit). in honor of 
G5the, the celebrated poet. Hydrate of iron, with about ten per cent 
of water, found in scales and acicular crystals. 

aOTTHARDITI]. See gotthardtite. 

GfrOTTHARDTITB. C. F. Rammelsberg, 1847, Ramm. Berz., 229 
(Qotthardtit), f. St. Gotthard, Switzerland, its locality. An obs. syn. of 
dufrenoysite. 

aOYAZITE. A, Damour, 1884, Bull. Soc. Min., vii, 204, f. Goyaz, 
Brazil, its locality. Phosphate of aluminum and calcium, found in 
small, yellowish grains. 

GRAHAMITI!. H. Wurtz, 1865, Kept. W. Virg., 16, after J. A. 
and J. L. Graham, the owners of the mine where it was found. A bitu- 
minous compound of several hydrocarbons, similar to asphaltum. 

aRAMBNITB. A, Krantz, 1857, Jahrb. Min., 395 (Gramenit), f. 
gramena, 'grass,' alluding to its color. A var. of chloropal of a grass- 
green color. 

GRAMMATITE. R. /. Haity, 1801, HaUy Min., iii, 162, f. 
ypanpLTf, -aro^, *a line,' alluding to a line in the direction of its longer 
axis sometimes seen on its crystals. A syn. of tremolite. 

GRABffMITE. D, L. O. Karsten, 1802. Klap. Beit., iii, 290, f. 
ypa/iMVt * * line,* alluding to its fibrous appearance. An obs. syn. of 
wollastonite. 

GRANAT. The earlier form of garnet. 

GRANATTTE. Variant of grenatite. 

GRANGESITE. Variant of grengesite. 

GRANULINA. A. Scacclii, 1882, Nap. Ac. Rend., xxi, 176, f. its 
granular form. A form of silica, probably identical with tridymite. 

GRAPB-STONB. A name sometimes used for botryolite, of which 
it is a translation. 

GRAPHIC GOLD. 7. v. Bom, 1790, Born Cat. Foss., ii, 467 
(Aurum graphicum). A syn. of graphic tellurium. 

GRAPHIC TBLLURIUM. A. Aikin, 1814, Aik. Min., 70, from* 
the arrangement of its crystals like written characters. A syn. of 
sylvanite, telluride of gold and silver. 

GRAPEOTE. A. O. Werner, 1789, Berg. Jour., i, 880 (Graphit), f. 
yf}d(p€iv, *to write,* because used for pencils. One of the forms of 
native carbon, found in scales or metal like masses, and popularly called 
black-lead. 

aRAPHITTTE. W. Luzi, 1893, Deut. Ch. Ges. Ber., xxvi, (a), 890 



GRAPHITOID 108 ORBBM BOOA 

(Graphitit), f. graphite. A fonii of graphite, which does not give the 
so-called nitnc-acid reaction. 

GRAPHITOID. A. Salter, 1885, Zt. Geol., xxxvii, 441, because of 
its similarity to graphite. A yar. of graphite, which will bum in the 
Bunsen flame. 

Used earlier by 0. U. Shepard, 1867, A. J. S., 2d, xliii, 28, as the 
Dame for the carbon found in meteorites. 

GRASTTTE. J. B. Pearae, 1864. A. J. 8., 2d, xxxvii, 224, f. 
Xpolari?, * grass,' in allusion to its color. A syn. of ripidolite. 

GRAUUTB. E. F. Qheker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 300 (Graulit), f. 
Graul, Saxony, its locality. A syn. of tecticite. 

GRAY ANTIMONY. B. Jameson, 1805, Jam. Min., ii, 417, f. the 
earlier name, Grauspiesglaserz. A syn. of stibnite, and sometimes also 
of Jameson ite. 

GRAY COBALT. An early popular name for smaltite, alluding to 
its color. 

GRAY COPPER. An early name for tetrahedrite. 

GRAY MANGANESE. The earliest name for pyrolusite, and also 
sometimes used for manganite. 

GRAY SILVER. Silver-bearing tetrahedrite was often so called; 
also a syu. of selbite. 

GREEN DIALLAGE. B. J. Haiiy, 1801, Hatty Min., iii, 90 
(Diallage verte). Thin foliated pyroxene and amphibole were so called 
when green in color. 

GREEN EARTH. The popular name for both glauconite and 
celedonite, alluding to tbeir color. 

GREEN FELDSPAR. A syn. of amazon stone. 

GREEN IRON ORE. An early name for dufrenite. 

GREENLANDITE. M. H. Klaproth, 1809, Tasch. Min., Iii, 198 
<Gr5nlandit), f. Greenland, its locality. An obs. name for precious 
garnet. 

Also used by A. Breithaupt, 1858, Berg. Hut., xvii, 61 (Green landit). 
An obs. syn. of columbite, the name based on supposed difference in 
crystallization from normal columbite. 

GREEN LEAD ORE. /. G. Wallenus, 1747, Wall. Min., 296 
{GrOn Blyspat), alluding to its usual color. An early name for pyro- 
morphite. 

GREEN MALACHTTB. A popular name for malachite, to dis- 
tinguish it from blue malachite, which is azurite. 

GREEN MICA. L v. Born, 1772, Bom Lith., i, 42 (Mloa vifidJa), 
alluding to its structure and color. A syn. of torbemite. 



aRSBNOOBITE 109 QROSSULAR 

aRSBNOCETTE. T, Thomson, 1840, Ed. Phil. Jour., xxviii, 890, 
in honor of Lord Greenock. Sulphide of cadmium, found in crystals 
and amorphous incrustations of a bright yellow color. 

GRBJBNOUGHITE. Variant of greeuovite. 

QREENOVITJB. A. Dufrerwy, 1840. Ann. des M., 3d. xvii, 529, in 
honor of G. B Greenough. A var. of titanite, colored red by manganese. 

GRBJBN SAND OF PBRU. An early popular syn. of atacamite, 
because found there in the form of sand. 

GREBN VITRIOL. Native sulphate of iron was so called, as well 
as the artificial. A syn. of melunterite. 

GRBGORITJB. T. Allan, 1819, Allan Min. Nomen., 46, after Rev. 
Wm. Gregor, its discoverer. An obs. syn. of menaccanite. 

GRBNATITE. H. B. Saussure, 1796, Saus. Alps, vii, § 1900, f. 
grenat. alluding to its resemblance to garnet. An obs. syn. of staurolite. 

Also used by L. J, M. Daubenton, 1799, Daub. Tab., 8. An obs. 
syn. of leucite. 

GRBNGBSITE. TF. Hisinger, 1831, Erz-u. Gestein, 50 (Grangesit). 
f. Grftngesberg, Sweden, its locality. A var. of chlorite, occurring in 
radiated groups of hexagonal crystals. 

GRENZELITE. Error for grengesite. 

GRIPHTTE. W. P. Headden, 1891, A. J. 8., 3d, xli, 415, f. yfTKpo^, 
*■ an enigma,' because of its unusual and somewhat enigmatical composition. 
Phosphate of aluminum, manganese, iron, calcium and sodium, found in 
dark brown, reniform masses. 

GRIQUALANDITB. Q. O. Hepburn, 1887, Chem. News, Iv, 240, f. 
Griqualand, So. Africa, its locality. Silica more or less impregnated 
with yellow oxide of iron, altered from crocidolite. 

GROCHAUTTE. M. Wehsky, 1873, Zt. Geol., xxv, 395 (Grochauit), 
f. Grochau, Silesia, its locality. A chlorite-like mineral, occurring in 
small, tabular, hexagonal crystals in serpentine. 

GRODDEOEITE. A. Arzruni, 1883. Zt. Kryst., viii, 343 (Grod- 
deckit), in honor of Dr. A. von Groddeck. A var. of gmelinite, in 
which iron and magnesium replace part of the aluminum and calcium. 

GROPPITJB. L, F. Svanberg, 1846, Vet. Ak. Stock., iii, 14 (Groppit), 
f. Gropptorp, Sweden, its locality. Hydrous silicate of aluminum and 
other bases, found in cleavable masses of a red color. 

GROROIIilTE. P. Berthiei\ 1832, Ann. Ch. Phys., li, 19. f. Groroi, 
France, its locality, and Az'do?. A var. of bog manganese, occurring in 
bard, globular masses. 

GROROITE. Error for groroilite. 

GROSSUZiAR. A. G. Werner, 1811, Hoff. Min., i, 479, f. Ribes 



OROSSULARITE 110 aUEJARITB 

grossularium, * the goofieberry/ alluding to its color. A pale green var. 
of garnet, often called gooseberry- garnet. 

GROSSUIiARITB. Variant of grossular. 

aROTHTTJB. J. D. Dana, 1867, A. J. S., 2d, xliv, 258, after Prof. 
P. Groth, who first described it. A mineral similar to titanite, but 
diHering somewhat in composition and cleavage. 

GRUNAUITB. J, Nicol, 1849, Nicol Min., 458. f. Grttnau. Prussia, 
its locality. Sulphide of nickel and bismuth, of a silver-gray color. 

GRUNBRITE. A, Kenngoii, 1858, Kcnng. Min., 69 (GrQnerit), 
after E. L. GrQner, who first described it. A var. of amphibole, of a 
silky brown color, containing much iron. 

GUADAIiCAZARITJB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 59 (Guadal- 

cazite), f. Guadalcazar, Mexico, its locality. Changed by T, Petersen, 
1872, Min. Milth., 69, to the more correct form. Sulphide of mercury, 
near metacimiabante, but containing a little zinc. 

GUADALCAZITJB. See guadalcazarite.^ 

GUANAJUATITB. V. Fernandez [1873, La Repub.. July 18]. 1877, 
A. J. S., 3d, xiii. 319, f. Guanajuato, Mexico, its locality. Selenide of 
bismuth, found in minute, gray, metallic-looking needles. 

GUANAPITB. a U. 8/iepard, 1870. Rural Car., i, 470, f. Guanape 
IbI., its locality. Sulphate of potassium and ammonium, occurring in 
irregular balls, looking like red rock salt, and found in guano. 

A. Raimondi, 1878, Min. Perou. 30, has applied the name guafiapUe, 
to the mineral earlier called oxnmmite. 

GUANITE. E. F. TeechemacJier, 1846, Phil. Mag.. 3d, xxvlii, 546, 
f. guano, in which it was found. An obs. syn. of struvite. 

GUANOVULITB. F. Wibel, 1874, Deut. Ch. Ges. Ber., vii, (a), 89» 
(Guanovulit), f. guano, ovum, and Az'Oo?, because found in birds' eggs in 
guano. Hydrous sulphate of potassium and ammonium. 

GUANOXAIilTB. G. U. Shepard, 1870, A. J. S., 2d, 1, 273, f. ite 
composition and place of occurrence. A doubtful compound of sulphate 
of potassium and oxalate of ammonium, called a pseudomorph after birds' 
eggs. 

GUARINITE. O. OuUcardi, 1857, Nap. Ac. Rend. Mem., ii, 408, 
in honor of Prof. G. Guarini. Silicate of calcium and titanium, found 
in small, yellowish crystals at Mt. Soniuiu. 

GUATACANITB. F. Field, 1859, A. J. S.. 2d. xxvii, 63, f. Guaya- 
cana, Chili, its locality. An obs. syn. of enargite. 

GUATAQUUiLITB. Variant of guyaquillite. 

aUEJARITE. E. Oumenge, 1879, Bull. Soc. Min., ii, 201, f. Quejar, 



GUBRITB 111 GTROLITB 

Spain, its locality. Sulph-antimoDide of copper, occurring in ortbo- 
rhombic crystals of a steel -gray color. 

OUBRITB. Error for geicnte. 

GUrrERMANNITE. W. F. HilUbrand. 1885, Geol. Siirv. U. S. 
Bull., 20, 105, after Frank Guiterman, its discoverer. Sulpb antimonide 
of lead, of a bluish -gray color. 

aUBIBBLLITE!. F. v. Kobell, 1870. K. Ak. Ml\ncb., i, 294 (GQm. 
beliit), after C. W. GQmbell, who analyzed it. A hydrous silicule of 
aluminum, near pyrophyllite. 

QUM LBAD. A syn. of plumboresinite, of which it is a translation. 

QUBIMrrE. A. Breithaupi, 1882, Breit. Char., 99 (Gumiiiit). f. 
gammi, ' gum.' An obs. name for a gum-like var. of balloysite. 

Also used by J. 2>. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 179, for hydrate of 
uranium, found in reddish- yellow masses, looking like gum. 

aUNNISONTTE. F. W, Clarke and N, W. Perry. 1882. Am. Chem. 
Jour., !▼» 140, f. Gunnison, Colo, its locality. A massive miueral of 
deep purple color, probably an altered fluorite. 

GURHOFIAN. 2>. X. O, Karsten, 1807. Ges. Nat. Berl. Mag., i, 
357, f. Gurhof, Austria, its locality. A rar. of dolomite, containing 
more than the normal amount of calcium. 

GURHOFITE. Variant of gurhoflan. 

GURHOIjITE!. Error for gurolite. 

GUROIiITB. See gyrolite. 

GUTAOANITE. Error for guayacanite. 

aUTAQXnUilTE. J. F. W. Johnston, 1838. Phfl. Mag., 8d, xiii, 
829, f. Guyaquill, its locality. An oxygenated hydrocarbon of a pale 
yellow color, now considered a mixture. 

GTBANTTB. T, Thormon, 1843, Phil. Mag.. 8d, xxii. 191, f. rv^v6<;, 
'naked,' in allusion to its locality. Bare Hills, Md. A syn. of dewey- 
Hte. 

GYPSITB. Variant of gypsum. 

GTP8UM. An old name, f. yvi/fo?, 'plaster.' Hydrous sulphate 
of calcium, a soft mineral of various colors, made into plaster of Paris by 
burning. 

GYRASOLB. Error for girasol. 

GYRTTB. /. 0. Ullmann, 1814, Ullm. Tab., 826 (Gyrit), f. yvfjo?, 
' a ring .' in allusion to the rounded streaks on its surface of fracture. An 
obs. syn. of siderite. 

GYROUTB. T. Anderson, 1851, Phil. Mag., 4th, i. 111 (Gurolite), f. 
XtJpo?. 'round/ alludiug to its form, and XiVo^, Hydrous silicate of 
lime, fottBd in ndiated concretions. 



HAARCIALITB 113 HAIR-ZEOIiITB 

HAARCIALITE. A. Dufrenoy, 1847, Duf. Min., iii, 768. An 
error for baarzeolith. Bee hair-zeolite. 

HADDAMITI!. G, U. Sltepard, 1877, Shep. Cont. Min., 8, f. 
Haddam, Ct., its locality. A miueral of which the characters have not 
been fully determined, but closely related to microlite. 

HiBMAFIBRITJB. See hemafibrite. 

HiEMATITI]. See hematite. 

HJEMATOOONTTB. /. F. L. Hausmann, 1847, Haus. Min., !i. 
1804 (Hamatokonit). f. aljiia, 'blood,* and Kovia, 'powder,* because it 
gives a red streak. A var. of calcite, colored blood-red by oxide of 
iron. 

HiBMATOIiITE. See hematolite. 

HiBMATOSTIBIITE. See hematostibiite. 

HiBMOSTIBIITE. Variant of hematostibiite. 

EUEM08TILBITE. Error for haemostibiite. 

HAFNUFJORDITI!. J. O. ForchJiammer, 1848, Berz. Irsb.. 191, f. 
Hafnefiord, Iceland, its locality. Recently shown to be merely colorless 
labradorite. 

HAGBMANNITB. C, U. Shepard, 1866, A. J. S.. 2d, xlii, 246, 
after Dr. G. Hagemann, who first called attention to it. A fluoride 
similar to thomsenolite, but yellow to brown in color. 

HAIDINGERITB. B. Turner, 1827, Ed. Jour. Sci., vi, 817, in 
honor of W. Haidinger. Hydrous arsenate of calcium, found in minute, 
white crystals, forming crusts and druses. 

The same name was given by P. Berthier, 1827, Ann. Ch. Phys., 
XXXV, 851, to the mineral later called berthierite, which see. 

HAINITE. /. Bluminch, 1893, Min. Mitth., xiii, 472 (Hainit), f. the 
Hohe Hain Mts., Bohemia, where it was found. A silicate containing 
calcium, sodium, titanium and zirconium. 

HAIR-PTRITE8. A. O. Werner, 1789, Berg. Jour., i, 383 (Haar- 
kies), alluding to the capillary form of its crystals. A syn. of millerite. 

This name has also been applied to marcasite, when in capillary 
crystals. 

HAIR-SALT. A, G. Werner, 1789, Berg. Jour., i. 879 (Haarsalz), 
so called because it occurs in capillary crystals. An early name for 
alunogen, perhaps not original with Werner. 

HAIR-STONE. An early name for quartz containing capillary 
crystals of rutile, actinolite or other similar minerals. 

HAIR-ZEOLITE. K. G. v. LeonMrd, 1809, Leon. Top. Min., ill, 
813 (Haarzeolith). A syn. of fibrous zeolite, which may be either natro- 
lite, scolecite or mesolite. 



118 

HALirZI. E, F. Olocker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 290 (Halites), f. aX^, 
'salt.' Rock salt, or commoa salt as a mineral. 

HALLITE. J. C. Delametlierie, 1806, Jour, de Phys., Ixii, 858, f. 
Halle, Prussia, its locality. An obs. syn. of aluminite. 

Also used by A. R, Leeds, 1871, Jour. Frank. Inst., Ixii, 70, after Mr. 
John Hall, its discoverer. An altered mica, of green or yellow color, a 
member of the vermiculite group. 

HALLOTLITJB. Error for halloysite. 

HAIXOYSITB. P. Berthier, 1826, Ann. Ch. Phys., xxxii, 332, after 
Baron Omalius d'Halloy, a Belgian geologist, who first noticed it. A 
massive, clay-like mineral, essentially silicate of aluminum, found in sev- 
eral colors and varieties. 

HAIiLOTTB. Error for halloysite. 

HAI.OCHAI1ZITJB. A, Breitliaupt, 1841, Breit. Handb., ii, 165 
(Halochalzit), f. a As, 'salt,' and chalcites, 'copper ore.' An obs. syn. 
of atacamite, or native copper chloride. 

HAIiOTRIOHINZS. Variant of halotrichite. 

HALOTRIOrarrB. E. F. Qlocker, 1839, Glock. Min., 691 (Halo- 
trichit), f. the Latin form, halotrichum, which in turn is from the older 
German name, Haarsalz. Actually made up from aXi, 'salt,' and dpz'^, 
rpiKo?. * hair.' Iron alum, occurring in yellowish-white, fibrous masses. 

J. F. L. Hauemann has used the same name, 1847, Haus. Min., ii, 
1174, as a syn. of alunogen. 

HAMARTITJB. A. E. Nordemkiold, 1868, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., 
XXV, 399 (Hamartit), f. dpidpTia, * an error,' alluding to the earlier mistake 
in its analysis. A syn. of bastnftsite. 

HAMBERGITE. W, C. Brogger, 1890, Zt. Kryst. , xvi, 65 (Ham- 
bergit). after A. Hamberg, its discoverer. Hydrous borate of glucinum, 
occurring in colorless or white, orthorhombic crystals. 

HAMBLITI!. T. S. Hunt, 1886, Hunt Phys., 194, in honor of Rev. 
T. 8. Hamel, of Quebec. A doubtful silicate of aluminum and iron, 
separated from limestone by acid. 

HAMUNTTE. W. E, Hidden and 5. L, Penfleld, 1890, A. J. S., 8d, 
Yxxix, 511, after Dr. A. C. Hamlin, who has shown much interest in the 
minerals of Maine, where it was found. A fluo-phosphate of aluminum^ 
or glucinum, or both, not yet fully examined. 

HAMPSHIRIN. See hampshirite. 

HAMPSHnUTII. R. Hermann, 1849, Jour. Pk. Ch., xlvi, 235 
(Hampshii'it), f. Hampshire Co., Mass., where the specimens were found. 
A name given to certain steatite pseudomorphs, having the form of 
quartz, and first described by CTiesier Dewey, 1822, A. J. S., iv, 274. 



HANKSITE 114 

0, U. Shepard calls it ' Hampshirin, a var. of sepiolite,' 1876, Shep. Cat. 
Min., 3. 

HANESITE. W. E. Hidden, 1885. A. J. 8., 8d. xxx, 188, after 
Prof. Henry G. Hanks, State Mineralogist of California, in which state it 
was found. Sulphate and carbonate of sodium, found in short, hexag- 
onal prisms of white or yellowish color. 

HANNATrrB. O. wni Bath, 1878. Ber. Nied. Ges.. 11 (Hanuayit), 
in honor of J. B. Hannay, of Manchester, £ng. !Namcd at the request of 
Prof. Mclvor, of Melbourne, who discovered it. Hydrous phosphate of 
magnesium and ammonium, found in slender, yellowish crystals in guauo. 

HAPIiOME. See aplome. 

HAPLOTTPITE. E, 8. Dana, 1892, Dana Min., 217. modified from 
A. Breit/iaupVs name, 1880, Breit. Uib., 65. Hnplotypes £isen-Erz. which 
in turn is probably made up from dnXooi, and rtjitoi, *a single type.' 
An obs. name of titaniferous hematite. 

HARD FAHLUNITJB. W. Hisinger, 1815, Afli. i Fis., iy, 842 
(Harteu Fahlunit). The term was at first applied to what was con- 
sidered a hard yar. of fahlunite, but the name was retained after the 
mineral was proved to be iolite. An obs. syn. of iolite. 

HARD SPAR. This name was at first applied both to conrndum 
and andalusite. A. O. Werner, 1805, Jam. Min., ii, 544 (Hartspnth), 
confined it to andalusite, of which it is now an obs. syn. 

HAREISE. F. 8. Bevdant, 1882, Beud. Min., ii, 400, f. Haarkies, 
'hair pyrites.' An obs. syn. of millerite. 

HARA^ARTTTE. Error for hamartite. 

HARMOPHANE. A, Leymerie, 1857, Ley. Min.. ii, 118. taken 
from R. J. Hauy'$ name, corindon harmophaue, 1809. Hntly Tab., 80, f. 
dp^oS, 'a joint,' and (pai'yeaOat, 'to appear,' because it is a kind of 
conmdum where the natural joints (cleavage planes) are very apparent. 
An obs. syn. of corundum. 

HARMOTOMH. R. J. Hauy, 1801. HaQy Min., iii, 186, derivation 
not given, but the meaning is, 'that which divides itself at its Joints, 
referring to the fact that the pyramid made by its prismatic planes in 
turning divides parallel to a plane passed through its terminal edges; and 
the word is probably derived from dpjtiSs, 'a joint,' and refivctr, 'to 
cut.' Hydrous silicate of aluminum and barium, found usually in com- 
plicated twin crystals. 

HARRXNOTONm]. T. Thomson [1831. Bryce Tab.], 1888, Phil. 
Mag., 8d, iii, 85, after Mr. Harrington, of Dublin, a personal friend. 
An amorphous, chalk-like var. of mesolite. 

HARRISITB. a U, Shepard, 1855, Rept. Cant. Mine, 9, after the 



HARSTiaiTB 115 HAUTEFEUILLTTE 

Harris brothers, owners of llie mine. A var. of chnlcocite, having the 
cleavage of galenite, and pseudomorphous after it. 

HARSTiaiTB. O, Flink, 1886. Vet. Ak. Stock. Bihung.. xii. (2). 59 
(Harsligit), f. the Harstig mine, Sweden, its locality. Silicate of man- 
ganese and calcium, found in small, colorless, prismatic crystals. 

HARTINE. A. Schrotter, 1843. Pogg. Ann., lix. 45 (Hartin), f. 
the Oberhart, Austria, its locality. A resin derived from brown coal, 
identical with xyloretinite. 

HARTTTB. W, Haidinger, 1841, Pogg. Ann., liv. 261 (Hartil). f. 
the Oberhart. Austria, its locality. A hydrocarbon, from a kind of pine 
found in brown coal, similar to fichtelite. 

HARTMANNITE. E. J. Chapman. 1848. Chap. Min., 145. proba- 
bly in honor of Carl F. A. Hartmann, the German mineralogist. An 
obs. syn. of breithauptite. 

HARZCIALrm. Error for harzeolite. which is A. Ditfrenoy*» form, 
1859, Duf. Min., iv, 149. of haarzeolith, *bair zeolite.' 

HARZEOLITE!. See harzcialite. 

HATCHETINE. See hntchcttite. 

HATOHBTTTTB. J. J. Conybeare, 1821, Ann. Phil., 2d, i, 136 
(Hatchetine). after C. Hatchett, an English chemist who had analyzed 
similar minerals. Changed to hatchettitc by J. Z>. Dana, 1868, Dana 
Min., 731. A yellowish-white, wax-like hydrocarbon, somewhat siriilar 
to paraffin. 

HATOHBTTOLITB. J. L. Smith, 1877, A. J. S.. 8d. xv. 365. after 
C. Hatchett. the discoverer of columbium. and Az9o?. A tantalo- 
oolumbate of uranium, of yellow-brown color and resinous lustre. 

HAUCHBOORNITB. R. Scheibe, 1892 (for 1891). Jahrb. Geol. 
Landesant.. i,91 (Hauchecornit). in honor of Dr. W. Hauchecorn. Sul- 
phide of nickel and bismuth, of a light bronze color. 

HAUBRTTB. W. Haidinger, 1846. Haid. Ber.. ii, 2 (Hauerit). in 
hoQor of Joseph Ritter v. Haucr. vice-president of the society before 
which the account of it was road, and of his son. Franz Ritter v. Hauer. 
who had assisted in its determination. Sulphide of manganese, found in 
octahedral crystals of a brownish or black color. 

HAUOHTONITB. M. F. HeddU, 18T8. Min. Mag , ii. 183. in honor 
of Dr. Samuel Haughton. of Dublin. A var. of biotite in which iron 
replaces much of the magnesium. 

HAUSBCANNITB. W. Haidinger, 1831 (read 1827). Roy. Soc. Ed.. 
zi, 138, after Prof. J. F. L. Hausmann, who had examined it. Proto- 
sesquioxide of manganese, found in brownish-black, tetragonal crystals. 

HAUTBFBXnUilTB. X. Michel, 1893, Bull. Soc. Min., xvi. 38, in 



HAihrNB 116 HSDaEHOGfr-STONB 

honor of Prof. P. Hautefeuille. Hydrous phosphate of calcium and 
magnesium. 

HAUTNE. See haUynite. 

HAUTNITE. T. C. Brunn-Neergard, 1807. Jour, des M. . xxi, 365 
(Hatlyne), in honor of the Abb6 Rene Just Hatly. Silicate of aluminum, 
calcium and sodium, found in bluish crystals or masses, in rocks of igneous 
origin. 

HAYDENTTE. P. Clemeland, 1822, Cleav. Min., 478, after Dr. H. 
H. Hayden, its discoverer. A yellowish var. of chabazite, from near 
Baltimore, Md. 

HATESINE. F. Alger, 1844. Alger Phil.. 318, after Dr. A. A. 
Hayes, who first examined it. A hydrous borate of calcium, or of 
calcium and sodium, found in globular, fibrous masses. 

HATESITE. Variant of hayesine. 

ELATSENITE. Variant of hayesine. 

HAYTORITE. C, Tripe. 1827, Phil. Mag., 2d, i, 39, f. Hay Tor» 
Devonshire, its locality. Quartz, pseudomorphous after datolite. 

HEAVY SPAR. A. 6. Werner, 1774, Wern. Kenn. Fobs., 27S 
(Schweren Spath), in allusion to its weight. A syn. of baiite. 

HEBETINE. A, Breithaupt, 1882, Breit. Char.. 130 (Hebetin), 
perhaps f. i}Pr}xi^<i, 'youthful,' (No derivation given.) An obs. sjm. of 
willemile. 

HEBRONTTE. F. i). Kobell, 1872, K. Ak. Mttnch./284 (Hebronit), 
f. Hebron, Me., its locality. A var. of amblygonite, containing little 
sodium. 

HECATOLITE. /. (7. DeUtmetherU, 1797. Delam. T. T., ii, 300 
(Hecatolite), f. "EKatTf, *Luna,' *lhe moon,* and Ai6o?. An obs. syn. 
of moonstone. 

HEOTORTTE. 8. H. Cox, 1882, N. Z. Inst. Trans. [ xv, 409. in honor 
of Dr. James Hector. An alteration product of pyroxene not fully- 
examined, found in radiating groups. 

HEDDUTE. R. P. Greg, 1855, Ed. Phil. Jour., 2d, i, 365, after M. 
Forster Heddle, its analyst. An artificial oxalate of potassium, at first 
supposed to be a native mineral. 

HEDENBERGITE. J. J. BeruHus, 1819, Berz. Nouv. Syst., 206 
(Hedenbergit), after Ludwig Hedenberg. a co-worker in mineralogy, who 
first analyzed and described it. A black, crystalline var. of pyroxene^ 
essentially a silicate of iron and calcium. 

HEDGEHOQ»8TONB. From Stachelschweinstein. A popular 
name for quartz crystals containing needles of gDthite or some other iron 
oxide. 



117 HSIiVITB 

A. BreitJiaupt, 1880, Jour. Ch. Ph., Ix, 810 (Hedy- 
phan), f. Tf8v'(p(xy7f^f 'beautifully bright/ alluding to its adamantine 
lustre. A colorless var. of mimetite, containing calcium. 

HBDTPHANITE. Variant of hedyphane. 

HSGANITE. Error for hDgauite. 

HEINTZITJB. 0. Lmdecke [1889, Zt Nat. Halle, Ixii, 854], 1890, Zt. 
Kryst.. xviii, 481 (Heiutzit), after Prof. Wilhelm H. Heintze, of Halle, 
wbo had examined other borates from the same locality. A hydrous 
borate of magnesium and potassium, found in small, white, monocliuic 
crystals. 

HZSIiDBURGITJB. 0, Luedecke [1879. Zt. Nat. Halle, iv, 291], 
1880, Zt. Kryst., iv, 544 (Heldburgit), f. Heldburg, near Coburg, Germany, 
its locality. A yellow mineral resembling guariuite, not yet analyzed. 

HELJBNITE. A, NawratU, 1888, Dingier J., ccxlviii, 518 (Helenit), 
f. the Helena Shaft, Ropa, Gallicia, where it was found. A yellow 
mineral wax, near ozocerite. 

HSIiEROCIilN. Error for heteroclin. 

HBLIOLTTB. J. C. Delametherie, 1797, Delam. T. T., ii, 200. f. 
^Azo^, ' the sun,' and XzBoi. An obs. name for sunstone. 

HELIOPHYLIilTE. G. Flink, 1888, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., xlv, 
574 (Heliophyllit), f. ffXioi, 'the sun,' and <pvXXoy, 'a leaf,' alluding to 
its color and structure. A foliated var. of ecdemite. 

HELIOTROPE. From ^Azo^, 'the sun,' and rpineiv, 'to turn,' 
because according to Pliny, 77, Pliny Hist., Bk. 87, 60, it gives a red 
reflection when put in water in the face of the sun (Dana). A green 
chalcedony with small spots of red jasper, having a fancied resemblance 
to drops of blood, hence often called bloodstone. Pliny's heliotropium 
was plasma veined with much red jasper. 

HELLEFIilNTE. A. Cronstedt, 1758, Crons. Min., 57 (Halleflinte), 
f. halle, ' a rock,' and flinte, * flint ; ' a translation of the earlier Latin 
name petrosilex. A compact rock, now generally called felsite. 

HELMINTHE. G. H. 0. Volger, 1854, Volg. Ent. Min.. 142, f. 
eXuiviy 'tvBoi, 'a worm,' referring to its structure. A var. of chlorite^ 
occurring in slender, worm-like aggregations. 

HEIiVETAN. R. T. Simmler [1862, Simm. Petrog., 9], 1868, Kenng. 
Ueb. for 1862-65, 185, f. Helvetia, because found in Switzerland. A 
gray, micaceous mineral from the Alps, never fully described. 

HEIiVIN. See helvite. 

HEIiVITE. A, G, Werner, 1817, Wem. Letz., 29 (Helvin), f. 
7/Ato?, 'the sun,' in allusion to its yellow color. A honey-yellow to green- 
ish silicate of gluciuum and manganese, formerly called tetrahedral garnet. 



HSMAFIBRITB 118 HEPATITI! 

HEMAFIBRITB. L. J, Igelsirom, 1884, Geol. F6r. Fork., vii, 210 
<Aimafibrit), f. aijua, * blood,' and fibra, 'fibre,' alludiug to its color and 
structure. A hydrous arsenate of manganese, found in blood-red spheres 
with a fibrous structure. 

HSMATTTS. From o/V^rirT/S, 'bloodstone,' from the red color of 
its powder. Anhydrous sesquioxide of iron, one of the most valuable 
of the iron ores. 

HEMATOCONITS. See hsematoconite. 

HBMATOLITB. L. J. Igelstrom, 1884, Geol. Fftr. FOrh., vii, 210 
(Aimatolit), f. aiudroeti, * blood-red,' from its color, and XiQo?. Hy- 
drous arsen-antimouate of manganese, found in small, blood-red crystals. 

HBMATOSTIBnTB. L. J. Igelstrom, 1885, Bull. Soc. Min., viii, 
143 (HsBmatostibiite), f. aiua, 'blood,' and stibium, 'antimony,* because 
of its color and composition. A var. of manganostibiite. blood-red in 
thin splinters. 

HEMICHALOITB. F. v. Kobell, 1864, Eob. Geschicht.. 600 (Hemi- 
chalcit), f. T/yt/i", ' half,' and ;fa/l/<'o5, 'copper,' so called because it contains 
half as much copper as wittichite, which it resembles. An obs. syn. of 
emplectite. 

HBBIIMORPHITB. A, Kenngoit, 1853, Eenng. Min., 67 (Hemi- 
morphit), f. the hemimorphic character of some of its crystals. An 
obs. syn. of calamine, silicate of zinc. 

HBMIOPAIi. ff. H, A, Francke, 1890, Francke Min. Norn., 81. 
A substitute for the old German name Halbopal. 

HBNEBIilTB. E. J, Chapman, 1843, Chap. Min., 121, probably in 
honor of Johann F. Henckel. An obs. syn. of argentite. 

HBNRYITB. F. M. Bndlich, 1874, E. M. Jour., xviii. 138. in honor 
of Prof. Joseph Henry. A mixture of altaite and pyrite, at first con- 
sidered a distinct mineral. 

HBNWOODITB. J. H. Collins, 1876, Min. Mag., i, 11, in honor of 
Wm. Jory Hen wood, F.R.S. A hydrous phosphate of copper and alu- 
minum, resembling turquoise. 

HBPATIO PYRITBS. R. Kirwan, 1796, Kirw. Min., ii, 83. f. 
hepaticus, ' of the liver,' alluding to its color, a translation of Leberkies 
of ^. G. Werner, 1791, Wern. Pabst., 139. A var. of pyrite of a brown 
or dull color. 

HBPATIN. A, Breithaupt, 1847, Breit. Handb.. iii, 891, f. the 
earlier form, Hepatin-Erz, 'liver-ore,' 1832, Breit. Char., 224. An 
amorphous mixture of limonite and a copper ore, of a liver-brown 
color. 

HBPATITB. B, L. Q. Earaten, 1800. Karst. Tab., 75 (Hepatit), f. 



HEPATOPYRITB 119 HESSITB 

the older form, lapis hepaticus. So named because it gives out a fetid 
odor (like that of hepar sulphur) when struck. A fetid var. of barite. 

HEPATOPYRITIS. Syn. of hepatic pyrites. 

HERAOIiEAN STONE. An early name for loadstone. 

HERBEOKITS. A. Ihcfrenoy, 1847, Duf. Mln., ill, 562, f. Herbeck, 
Bohemia, its locality. Agate or jasper, impregnated with iron hydrate; 
a rock rather than a mineral. 

HERCINITE. Error for hercynite. 

HBROYNITB. F. X. M. Zippe [1839, Min. BOh.], 1847, Glock Syn., 
118 (Hercynit), f. Silva Hercynia, the Latin name of the Bohemian Forest, 
where it was found. Aluminate of iron, found in black, octahedral 
crystals. 

Also an obs. syn. of harmotome, 1817, Zap. Lex., ii, 60. 

HBRDERITB. W. Haidinger, 1828, Phil. Mag., 2d, iv, 1, in honor 
of Baron Siegmund A.' W. v. Herder. A fluo-phosphate of glucinum 
and calcium, found in brilliant, transparent crystals. 

HERMANNITE. A, Kenngott, 1853, Kenng. Min., 71 (Hermannit), 
after Dr. R. Hermann, who had described it under the name mangan- 
amphibole. An obs. syn. of rhodonite. 

HERMANNOIilTB. G. U. Shepard, 1876, A. J. S., 3d, xi, 140 
(published first, 1875, in a Popular Guide to the Museum of Amherst 
College, p. 71), in honor of Dr. R. Hermann, of Moscow, and XiBoS. A 
mineral from Haddam, Ct., probably identical with columbite. 

HBRMESITB. A, BreitTiaupt, 1866, Berg. Hot., xxv, 182 (Herme- 
sit), f. ^Epuff^, 'Mercury.' A var. of mercurial tetrahedrite. 

HBRRENGRUNDITB. A. Brezina, 1879, Zt. Kryst., iii, 359 
(Herrengrundit), f. Herrengrund, Hungary, its locality. A hydrous 
sulphate of copper and calcium, occurring in spherical groups of small, 
green crystals. 

HBRRBRITE. A. M, del Rio, 1830, A. J. S., xviii, 193, after 
C. Herrera, its first analyst. A supposed carbonate of tellurium and 
nickel, but proved by F. A, Oenth, 1855, Acad. Nat. Sci., vii, 232, to be 
smithsonite, carbonate of zinc. 

HBRSOHBUTB. A. Levy, 1825, Ann. Phil, 2d, x, 262, in honor 
of Sir John Herschel. A hydrous silicate of aluminum, calcium and 
sodium, now considered a var. of chabazite. 

HBRVEIiBCA. Error for hverlera. 

HBSSBNBEROITE. A. Kenngott, 1863, E. Ak. Mtlnch. Ber., ii, 
280 (Hessenbergit), in honor of Friedrich Hessenberg. A silicate of 
undetermined composition, occurring on crystals of eisenrose. 

HBSSITB. /. Frobeh 1843, FrOb. Grund., 49 (Hessit), after Germain 



HSSSONim 130 

H. Hess, who had examiDed it. Telluride of silver, occurrlDg in gray, 
sectile masses. 

HESSONTTB. See essonite. 

HSTiEROLITE. O, B. Moore, 1877, A. J. 8., 8d, xiv. 428, f. 
SraipoSt 'a companion,' because found with chalcophanite, and XiOoi, 
No analysis has been given, but it contains zinc and manganese, and is 
called a zinc hausmannite. 

HETAIRITB. F. Zirkel, 1881, Naum. Min., 371. A variant of 
hetserolite. 

HETBP08ITII. See heterosite. 

HBTSROCUNE. A. Bretthaupt, 1840. Pogg. Ann., xlix. 204 
(Heteroklin), f. erepoKXivifi, 'unequal,' because, being hemihedral, its 
crystals have a different inclination from those of holohedral manganese 
minerals. A syn. of marceline. 

HETBROGBNITB. A. Frenzel, 1872, Jour. Pk. Ch., 2d, v, 404 
(Heterogenit), f. ezepoyeyi^i, 'of another kind,' referring to its difference 
in composition from certain minerals which it otherwise resembles. A 
hydrous oxide of cobalt, resulting from the decomposition of smaltite. 

HBTBROMBRITB. R. Hermann, 1846 (for 1845-46), Min. Ges. 
St. Pet. Ver., 205 (Heteromerit), because thought to be heteromerous with 
vesuvianite. A var. of vesuvianite, occurring in small, green crystals. 

HBTBROMBSITB. Error for heteromerite. 

HBTEROMORPHITB. C. F. RammeUberg, 1849, Pogg. Ann., 
Ixxvii, 240 (Heteromorphit), f. erepoS, 'another,' and juopipj}, 'form,' 
because its other name, ' feather-ore,' is not always applicable. A syn. 
of jamesonite. 

HBTBROSITB. F. Alluaud, 1826, Ann. Sci. Nat., viii, 846, f. 
erepo?, 'another,* probably because it is a second manganese mineral from 
the same locality. By an error in first publication it was spelled heteposite, 
1825, Ann. Ch. Pharm., xxx, 294. Avar, of triphyllite, found in bluish- 
gray, cleavable masses. 

HBUBAOHITB. F. v. Sandberger [1876, K. Ak. Mlinch., 288], 
1877, Zt. Kryst., i, 415 (Heubachit), f. Heubachthal, Baden, its locality. 
A hydrous oxide of cobalt and nickel, occurring in thin, soot-like incrus- 
tations; perhaps a mixture. 

HBULANDITB. ff. J. Brooke, 1822, Ed. Phil. Jour., vi, 112, in 
honor of Henry Heuland. Hydrated silicate of aluminum and calcium, 
found in crystals of various colors, with pearly lustre. 

BBXAGONTTB. E. Goldsmith, 1876, Acad. Nat. Sci. Proc, 160, f. 
the apparent hexagonal shape of its crystals. A var. of amphibole, 
resembling tremolite, but pink in color. 



121 HITOHOOOSrra 

HBYDSNBEROITXI. Error for hedenbergite. 

HIBBSRTITE. M. F, Heddle, 1878, Min. Mag., ii. 25, after Samuel 
Hibbert, who examined minerals from the island of Unst. its locality. A 
hydrous carbonate of calcium and magnesium, of lemon-yellow color; 
probably a mixture. 

HIDDSNTTE. J, L, Smith, 1881, A. J. 8., 8d, xxi, 128, in honor of 
Wm. E. Hidden. A var. of spodumene, found in transparent, emerald- 
green crystals. 

HIELMITE. A, B, Nordemkiold, 1860, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., 
xvii, 84 (Hjelmit), in honor of P. J. Hjelm. A black stanno-tantalate 
of iron and other bases. 

HII3RATITS. A. Cossa [1882, Ace. Line. Trans., vi, 141], 1882. 
Bull. Soc. Min., v, 61, f. Hiera, the ancient name of Vulcano, one of the 
Lipari Isl. A fluo-silicate of potassium, found in the f umaroles of 
Vulcano. 

HIGHGATE RESIN. T. Tkonuton, 1818, Ann. PhU., ii. 9, f. High- 
gate Hill, London, its locality. A syn. of copalite. 

HILLANGSITE. L. J. Igelstrom, 1884, Bull. Soc. Min., vii, 232, f. 
the Hillang mine, Delarne, Sweden, its locality. A syn. of danne- 
morite. 

HINTZEITB. L. Milch, 1890, Zt. Kryst., xviii, 478 (Hintzeit), in 
honor of Prof. C. H. Hintze. A syn. of heinlzite. 

HIORTDAHLITE. W. C, Brogger [1889, Mag. Nat., xxxi, 232], 
1890, Zt. Kryst., xvi, 367 (Hiortdablit). in honor of Prof. Th. Hiortdahl, 
of Christiania. A silico-tluo-zirconate of calcium and sodium, found in 
yellow, triclinic crystals. 

HIROINB. See hircite. 

HraomS. H. Piddingion [1853, Arch. Pharm., Ixxiv, 818], 1855, 
Eenng. Ueb. for 1853, 134 (Hircine), f. hircus, *a goat,* because it emits a 
strong, animal odor when burned. An amorphous, yellowish-brown 
hydrocarbon from Burmah. 

HISINGBRITE. /. /. Berzeliua, 1828, Pogg. Ann., xiii, 505 (Hisin- 
gerit), in honor of Wilhelm Hisiuger. A hydrous silicate of iron, of 
uncertain composition. 

Used earlier by Berzelius, 1815, Afh: i Pis., iv 96. Hisinger would 
not accept the name and changed it to gillingite, of which it is now an 
obs. syn. 

HISLOPTTB. 8, Hdughton, 1859, Phil. Mag., 4th, xvii, 16, after the 
Rev. Stephen Hislop, from whom it was received. A var. of calcite, 
colored greenish by glauconite. 

HTTOHOOOKITB. C, U. Shepard, 1856, Rept. Cant. Mine, 11, in 



HJELMITE 123 HOMIUTB 

honor of Dr. Edward Hitchcock, of Amherst College. A var. of 
plumbogumraite. 

HJEIiMITE. See hielmite. 

HCEGANITE. Error for hOgauite. 

HdSPFNBRITB. D. de Galliizen, 1801, Gall. Rec, 123. probably 
after J. G. A. Ha?pfuer, to whom its discovery was attributed. An obs. 
mime for tremolite. 

HdSRNBSITB. W. Haidinger [1859, Geol. Reich. Verb., xi, 41], 
1800, Keiiug. Ueb. for 1859, 17 (HOrnesil), in honor of Dr. M. H5rne8. 
Hydrous arsenate of magnesium, occurring in snow-white, foliated masses. 

HCEVBLITB. H. Oirard, 1863, Jahrb. Min., 568 (Hcevelit). in 
honor of Berghauptmann von Hoevel. A syn. of sylvite. 

HOFMANNTTB. E. BecM [1878, Ace. Line. Trans., ii, 135], 1879, 
Zt. Kryst., iii, 429, in honor of Prof. A. W. Hofmann. An oxygenated 
hydrocarbon, occurring in colorless, rhombic crystals. 

HOGAUITE. Error for hOgauite. 

HOGAUITB. C. J. 8elb, [1803, Ges. Nat. Berl. N. Schrift., iv, 395], 
1810, Kliip. Beit., v, 44, f. Hogau, Wllrtemberg, its locality. An obs. 
syn. of natrolite. 

HOG^TOOTH SPAR. Like dog-tooth spar, a popular name for 
calcite, occurring in acute scalenohedrons. 

HOHMANNITB. A. Frenzel, 1888, Min. Mitth., ix, 397 (Hohmann- 
it), after Tb. Hohmann, its discoverer. A var. of amarantite, resulting 
from slight iiUeration. 

HOLLOW SPAR. A. G. Werner, 1804, Ludw. Min., 210 (Hohl- 
spath). because the dark parts of the crystals were thought to have been 
hollow and filled up with slate. An obs. syn. of chiastolite. 

HOLMBSITB. See holmite. 

HOLMITE. E. D. Clarke, 1817, Ann. Phil., x, 71, after Mr. Holme, 
of Cambridge, its first analyst. A siliceous carbonate of lime from an 
unknown locality, found among paving-stones. 

In 1836, T. Thomson gave the name holmite, Rec. Gen. Sci., iii, 335, 
in honor of Dr. A. F. Holmes, of Montreal, to a mineral which proved to 
be identical with clintonite. Changed in 1837, Dana Min. , 266, to holmes- 
ite, both forms having since been used. 

HOMIOHLIN. A. BreitliaupU 1858, Berg. Hat., xvii, 385, f. ouix^tf^ 
'dimness,' because its freshly broken surface tarnishes on exposure. 
Sulphide of iron and copper, perhaps resulting from the alteration of 
copper pyrites. 

HOMILTTE. 8. R. Paijkull, 1876, Geol. POr. F6rh., iii, 229 
(Homilit), f. opLiXeiv, 'to occur together,' because it occurs with melt- 



HONSYSTONB 123 HOUILIiITB 

phauite and erdmannite. Boro-silicate of iron and calcium, found in 
dark brown or black, mouocllnic crystals. 

HONBYSTONB. A. Q. Werner, 1789, Berg. Jour., i, 380 (Houig- 
steiu), in allusion to its honey -yellow color. A syu. of mellite. 

HOPBITB. D. Brewster, 1824 (read 1823), Koy. Soc. Ed. Trans., 
X, 107, in honor of Dr. Thomas C. Hope. A phosphate of zinc which 
has not been analyzed. 

HORBACHITB. A. Enop, 1873, Jahrb. Min., 623 (Horbachit), f. 
Horbach, Baden, its locality. A sulphide of iron and nickel, near 
pyrrhotite. 

HORNBLBNDB. An old German name for any dark-colored, 
prismatic crystals found with metallic ores, but contaiuiug no valuable 
metal, blende meaning a deceiver. Now confiued to dark-colored varie- 
ties of amphibole. 

HORN-IiBAD. From Hornblei, a popular name for certain lead 
minerals of horny appearance. B. L. G, Karsten, 1800, Karst. Tab., 
78, applied it to the mineral now known as phosgenite. 

HORN-MBROURY. P. Woulfe, 1776, Phil. Trans., Ixvi, 618, f. its 
appearance. An early name for native calomel. 

HORN-QUICKSIIiVBR. Syn. of horn-mercury. 

HORN-SILVBR. J, Q. Wallenus, 1747, Wall. Min., 310 (Horn- 
silfver), because a silver ore of horny appearance. A syn. of cerargyrite. 

HORNSTONB. From Hornstein, from its horny appearance. A 
popular name for a var. of quartz resembling flint, but more brittle. 

HORSB-FIiBSH ORB. The name used by Cornish miners for 
bornite, on account of its purplish-red color. 

HORSFORDITB. T, H, N(yrUm and A. Laist, 1888, Am. Ch. Jour., 
X, 60, in honor of Prof. E. N. Horsford, of Cambridge. A copper 
antimonide, resembling silver in color and lustre, but tarnishing easily. 

HORTONITE. A, Dufrenoy, 1859, Duf. Min., iv, 424, probably in 
honor of Dr. William Horton. A steatitic pseudomorph of pyroxene, 
from Orange Co., N. Y. 

HORTONOUTB. O. J. Brush, 1869, A. J. S., 2d, xlvlii, 17, after 
Silas K. Horton, who first called attention to it, and XtQo?. A silicate of 
iron and magnesium, near chrysolite. 

HOUOHITB. C, U, Sfiepardy 1851, Am. Assoc, iv, 314, in honor of 
Dr. Franklin B. Hough. A var. of hydrotalcite, derived from the alter- 
ation of spinel. 

HOUILLITB. X. /. M. Baubenton [1799, Daub. Tab., 29], 1801, 
HaQy Min., iii, 218, f. houille, 'coal.' One of the several names that 
have been suggested for anthracite. 



HOVBZililTB 124 HUMITB 

HOVBIjUTB. Yariaut of hoevelite. 

HOVITB. /. n. and Q. OladsUme, 1863, Phil. Mag., 4th, zxiii, 466, 
f. Hove, near Brighton, Eng., its locality. A native carbonate of alumi- 
num and calcium, a soft eartby substance, probably a mixture. 

HOWARDITB. C. U, S/tepard, 1848, A. J. 8. , 2d, vi, 258, in honor 
of Luke Howard, an English meteorologist. A silicate of iron and 
magut'sium, found in certain meteorites. 

HOWUTE. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 598, after Prof. H. How. 
of Nova Scotia, who first examined it, and XiBoi, Hydro-boro-silicate 
of calcium, occurring in white nodules imbedded in gypsum. 

HUANTAJAYITB. A. liaimandi, [1878, Ann. 8oc. Lima, No. 6], 
1878, Min. Perou. 64, f. Huantajaya, Peru, its locality. A var. of 
halite (sodium chloride), containing one twentieth part of silver chloride. 

HUASOOLITB. /. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min.. 42, f. Huasco, Chili, 
it8 locality, and X^oi, A var. of galeuite. containing some zinc sulphide. 

HUBNERITB. B. ilT. Biotte, [1865, Reese River Reveille], 1865, Berg. 
Htlt., xxiv,'870, in honor of Hattenmeister Adolph HQbner, of Freiberg, 
Saxony. Tungstate of manganese, found in reddish-brown, bladed 
crystals. 

HUDSONITE. L. C. Beck, 1842, Beck Min., 405, f. the Hudson 
River, near which it was first found. A black var. of pyroxene, con- 
taining much iron. 

HULIilTE. E. Z Hardman, 1878, Roy. Ir. Ac. Proc., iii, 116, after 
Prof. Edward Hull, who examined it. A velvet-black, amorphous, 
hydrous silicate, near delessite. 

HUMBOLDTILITE. T. Monticelli and N. Covelli, 1825, Mont. 
Oov., 377 (Umboldilite), in honor of Buron von Humboldt, and A.zl9oS. 
A var. of melilite, often found in large crystals. 

HUMBOLDTINE. M. de Biviro, 1821, Ann. Cli. Phys., xviii, 210, 
in honor of Baron von Humboldt. Hydrous oxalate of iron, found 
usually in capillary, yellow crystals. 

HUMBOLDTITE. A. Levy. 1823. Ann. Phil., 2d. v, 134, in honor 
of Buron von Humboldt. An obs. syn. of datolite. 

Also used as a variant of humboldtine. 

HUMINITE. O, Ekman, 1868, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., xxv, 146 
{Huminit), f. its humus-like character. A hydrocarbon from Sweden, 
resembling coal. 

HUMITB. J. L, Bournon, [1813, Bourn. Cat.], 1814, Allan Min. 
Nomen., 45, in honor of Sir Abraham Hume, of London. A lluo-silicate 
of mnguesiuui long considered a var. of chondrodite, but now made a 
distinct species on crystal lographic grounds. 



HUMOFBRRXTB 125 HYALITB 



C. U. Shepard, 1876. 8hep. Cat. Min., 8, proba- 
bly f. bumus and femim. An undescribed eartby ochre. 

HUNTBRrm. 8. HaughUm, 1859, Phil. Mag., 4th. xvii. 16, after 
the Rev. Robert Hunter, from whom it was received. A var. of cimoiite, 
from India. 

HUNTIUm. H. WurU, 1879, £. M. Jour., xxvii, 55, in honor of 
Dr. T. Bterry Hunt, and XtQoi. An arsenide of silver of uncertain com- 
position, found with other silver minerals at Silver Islet, Ontario. 

HURBAUUTB. F. Alluaud, 1825, Ann. Ch. Phys., xxx, 802. f. 
Bureaux. France, its locality, and Ax'OoS. Hydrous phosphate of manga- 
nese, found in small, reddish, prismatic crystals. 

HUBONITE. T, Thomson, 1886, Thom. Min., i. 884, f. Lake Huron, 
near which it was found. A yellowish-green feldspar, closely related to 
anorthite. 

HUTTBNBBRGITZI. A. Breithaupt, 1888, McKay Inaug., 48 
(HQttenbergit), f. Huttenberg, Carintbia, its locality. The name appears 
on a label in the Freiberg collection, in Breithaapt's handwriting. A 
▼ar. of lOlliugite. 

HUTSSBNITB. /. D. Dana, 1868. Dana Min.. 799, after A. Hayssen, 
who first described it. A var. of boracite, containing some iron, at first 
called iron boracite. 

HVBRLBRA. J. O. Forchhammer, 1844, Berz. Jahres., xxiii, 268, 
f. Hver, 'hot spring.* and lera, 'clay,' because it is a clay from Iceland, 
the land of hot springs. A white or reddish clay, separated from certaiu 
earths of Iceland by means of acid. 

HVBRSAIjT. J. O, Forchhaminer, 1844, Berz. Jahres., xxiii, 265. 
A local name, f. Hver, 'hot spring,' and salt, because it is a salt from Ice- 
land, the land of hot springs. A var. of halotrichite. 

HTAOINTH. A popular name for reddish zircon used as a gem. 
The hyacinth, TccKtvOo?, of the ancients was not this stone, but one of 
blue or purple color, perhaps the modern sapphire. Other minerals, nota- 
bly garnet and vesuvianitc, have also been called hyacinth. 

HTAOINTHINB. /. C. Delametherie, 1792, Delnm. Sciag., i. 268, 
in allusion to its color. An obs. name for vesuviauite. It had been 
called hyacinte du Vesuve by Borne de L'hle, 1783, De L. Cryst., ii, 291. 
As it was found in the rocks from other volcanoes. Delametherie con- 
sidered the name inappropriate. 

HTAOINTHOIDB. J, C. Delainetherie, 1795, Delam. T. T., iii, 463, 
f. its resemblance in color to hyacinth (zircon). An obs. name for 
cinnamon-stone. 

A. Q, Werner, 1794, Kirw. Min., i, 297, f. uaAoc, 



HYALOMELAN 126 HYDROBORAOITEI 

'glass,' which it resembles. A colorless var. of opal, occurring in 
globular concretions. 

The name hyalite, meaning glass stone, has also been used as a syn. of 
axinite, 1797, Klap. Beit., ii, 118 (Glasstein oder Hyalit). 

HYALOMELAN. J, F, X. Ilausmann, 1847, Hans. Min., 1, 545, f. 
vdXoi and jLteXd?, -(xvo?, 'black glass,* which it resembles. A syn, of 
tachylyte. 

HYALOPHANE. W. 8. v. Waltershausen, 1855, Pogg. Ann., xciv, 
134 (Hyaloplian), probably f. uaAoS, 'glass,' and (paivecrBai, 'to appear,' 
alluding to its transparency. A barium feldspar, found in transparent 
crystals similar to adularia. 

HYALOSIDERXTE. F. A. WalcJiner, 1833, Jour. Ch. Ph., xxxix, 
65 (Hyalosiderit), f. vaAo5, 'glass,' and aidr/po?, * iron,' from its appear- 
ance and composition. A very ferruginous var. of chiysolite, occurring 
in large, glassy crystals. 

HYALOTEKITE. A. E. Ntrrdemkidld, 1877, Geol. F5r. F5rh., iii, 
382 (Hyalotekit), f. vdXo<^ and Tr/Keiy, * to melt to glass,' because it fuses 
easily to a clear glass. A boro-silicate of lead, barium and calcium, 
found in coarsely crystalline masses. 

HYBLITE. W. 8. v. Walierahausen, 1853, Walt. Vul., 228 (Hyblit), 
f. Mt. Hybla, Sicily, its locality. One of the hypothetical varieties of 
palagonite. 

HYDRARGIIiLITE. ff. Davy, 1805, Phil. Trans., 162, f. vdoop, 
'water,' and ocfjyiXXx)?, *clay,' alluding to its composition. A syn. of 
wavellite. 

Also suggested by P. Cleaveland, 1822, Cleav. Min., 224, as a suitable 
name for the mineral that had just heen named gibbsite. Retained by 
G, Rose, 1839, Pogg. Ann., xlviii, 564, for the crystallized var. of gibb- 
Bite. 

HYDRARGYRITE. B. Bertravd, 1872, Ann. des M., 7th, 1, 412, f. 
hydrargyrum, ' mercury.' A very doubtful oxide of mercury, resulting 
from the decomposition of amalgam. 

Hydrargyrite is sometimes seen as an error for hydrargillite. 

HYDROAPATITE. A. Damour, 1856, Ann. des M., 5th, x, 65, 1 
its composition. A milk-white var. of apatite, resembling chalcedony 
and containing some water. 

HYDROBIOTITE. JT. C. Lewis, 1880, Acad. Nat. Sci. Proc, 319. 
A hyd rated var. of biotite. 

HYDROBORAOITE. G. H. Hess, 1834, Pogg. Ann., xxxi, 49 
(Hydroboracit), f. its composition. A hydrous borate of calcium and 
magnesium, greatly resembling gypsum. 



H7DROBOROOALOITB 127 HYDROOYANTTB 

HYDROBOROOALOITS. J, F. L. Eausmann, 1847, Haus. Min., 
li, 1429 (Hydroborocalcit), f. its composition. A syn. of hayesiue. 

HYDROBUCHOLZTTE. J. D. Dana, 1850, Dana Min., 296, f. T, 
Thomson* 8 earlier name, hydrous bucholzite, 1836, Tbom. Min., i, 287, so 
called because it resembles bucholzite, but contains water. An uncertain 
alteration product, of greenish-blue color. 

HYDROCALCITE. J. D. Dana, 1850, Dana Min., 212, alluding to 
its composition. A syn. of hydroconite. 

Also used by K. KosmanUy 1892, Zt. Geol., xliv, 155. A hydrous 
carbonate of calcium, found in fine needles in rock-milk. 

HYDROCASTORITE. Orattarola, [1876, Com. Geol. Boll., 823], 
1877, Zt. Kryst., i, 87. A hydrous silicate of aluminum and calcium, 
found coating crystals of castoiite, and resulting from its decomposition. 

HYDROCERITE. E, F. Blocker, 1881, Glock. Min., 956 (Hydro- 
cerit), f. its supposed composition, lanthanum being mistaken for cerium. 
An obs. syn. of lauthanite. 

Also used by the same author, 1847, Glock. Sjrn., 247. An obs. syn. 
of bastnSsite. 

HYDROOERUSSITE. A. E. Nordenskiold, 1877, Geol. F6r. F6rh., 
iii, 881 (Hydrocerussit), f . its composition. A hydrous carbonate of lead, 
occuriiug as a white, crystalline coating on native lead. 

HYDROOHLORE. R, Hermann, 1850, Jour. Pk. Ch., 1, 186 (Hy- 
drochlor), adapted from vdoof), 'water,* and pyrochlore, because avar. of 
pyrochlore containing a small amount of water. 

HYDROCINTTE. T, A. Beadwin, 1867, Read. Ind. Supp., ii (Hy- 
drocinit). Probably an error for hydrozincite, as it is said to be hy- 
drous oxide of zinc. 

HYDROOLINTONITB. F, W. Clarke and E. A. Schneider, 1890, 
A. J. S., 8d, xl, 452. A name used to show the relation of certain 
minerals to the clintouite group, but not applied to a definite mineml. 

HYDROOONTTE. J. F. L. Hausmann, 1847, Haus. Min., ii, 1405 
(Hydrokouit), f. vSooft, 'water,' and Kovia, Mime,' alluding to its compo- 
sition. A hydrous carbonate of calcium of recent formation, found 
under water, incrusting wood. 

HYDROOUPRITE. F, A. Oenth, 1875, A. J. S., 8d. xl, 452, f. 
vdoop, * water,* and cuprum, 'copper.' Hydrous oxide of copper, found 
as a soft, amorphous, orange- red coating, on magnetite. 

HYDROOYANITE. A. Scacchi, 1878 (read 1870), Nap. Ac. Atti, v, 
26 (Idrociano), f. vSoop, 'water,' and KvavoSf 'blue,' because when ex- 
posed to moist air its crystals absorb water and tura blue. Anhydrous 
sulphate of copper, occurring at Vesuvius. 



HTDRODOLOMITE 128 HTDROMANaANOOALOTTB 

HYDRODOLOMITE. J. D. Dana. 1850, Dana Min., 213, f. vSoop, 
* water/ aud dolomile. A hydrous carbonate of calcium and mag- 
nesium. 

HYDROFSRRITE. E, J Chapman, 1848, Chap. Min., 83, f. 
vdoop, 'water/ and ferrum. An obs. syn. of limunite. 

HYDROFITE. See bydrophite. 

HYDROFLUOOSRITE. R Hermann, 1855, Soc. Nat. Mosc. Nouv. 
Mem., X, 61 (Hydrofluocerit), f. A. Dufrenoy*8 e&rWer name, cerium hydro- 
Huate, 1845, Duf. Min., 11, 882, f. its composition. An obs. syn. of 
baslnSlsite. 

HYDROFLUORXTE. A. Scacehi, 1872, Nap. Ac. Rend.. 211 (Idro- 
fluore), f. its composition. Hydrofluoric acid gas, observed after certain 
eruptions of Vesuvius. 

HYDROFRANKLINTTE. W. J. Rapper, 1882, Dana Min., App. 
iii, 61, f. vdoop, ' water,' and frankliniie, because a hydrous mineral other- 
wise similar to frankliuite. A syn. of chalcophanite. 

HYDROaiOBERTTTE. A. Scacchi, 1885 Nap. Ac. Rend., xxiv, 310, 
f. vSoop, * water,' and giobertite (magnesite). A hydrous carbonate of 
magnesium of a light gray color, found in compact spheres in porphyry. 

HYDROHALITIS. J. F. L. ffausmann, 1847. Haus. Min., ii, 1458 
(Hydrohalit), f. vdoop, * water,* and 6?A5, 'salt,* because supposed to be a 
hydrous var. of common salt. 

HYDROHEMATTTS. A. Breithaupt, 1847. Breit. Handb., iii. 845 
(Hydrohaematit), f. vSgo/j, • water,' and hematite. An obs. syn. of 
turgite. 

HYDROILMENTTE. C. W. Blomstrand 1878, Blom. Titan., 4 
(flydroilmenit), f. vScop, * water,' and ilmenite. A partially decom- 
posed var. of ilmenite. containing a little water. 

HYDROIiANTHANTTE. E, F. Glocker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 248 
(Hydrolanthanit), f. vdoop, 'water,' and lanthanite, referring to its com- 
position. A.n obs. syn. of lanthanite. 

HYDROLANTHITE. Error for hydrolanthanite. 

HYDROLITE. E. de Dree, 1811, Dr^e Cat., 18, f. vdoop, 'water,* 
because it contains it, and Az'Qo?. An obs. syn. of gmelinite. 

HYDROMAGNESITE. H. O. Trolle Waehtmeister, 1827, Vet. Ak. 
Stock., 18 (Talkjordshydrat), f. its composition. Hydrous carbonate of 
magnesium, found in white, silky crystals or earthy crusts. 

HYDROMAONOOALCITE. C, F. Rimmelsherg, 1849, Jahrb. Ch. 
Ph. Min., 779 (Hydromagnocalcit), f. its composition. An obs. syn. of 
hydrodolomite. 

HYDROMANOANOOALOITE. K, F. A, Hartmann, 1850, Hart 



HTDROMnSOOVITB 129 HYDRORUTILE 

Min. Nacht., 299 (Hydromangauocalcit). A syn. of hydromagnocalcite^ 
probably from a confusion between magnesium and manganese. 

HYDROMUSOOVITS. A, Johfisione, 1889, Geol. Soc. Lond. Q. J., 
xlv, 863. A general name for the various hydro-micas derived from 
muscovite. 

HYDRONEPHEUTS. F, W. Clarke, 1886. A. J. S.. 3d, xxxi, 265. 
f. vdoofj, 'water,* and nephelite. Hydrous silicate of aluminum and 
sodium, resulting from the decomposition of nephelite. 

HYDRONICOITS. C. U, Shepard, 1877, Shep. Cont. Min.. 6, f. its 
composition. A name suggested for certain ''films of an apple-green 
color in case they prove to be hydrate of nickel." 

HYDRONICKELMAGNSSITS. C, U, Shepard, 1848, A. J. 8., 
2d, vi, 250, f. its composition. A suggested name for pennite. 

HYDROPHANS. From vSaop, 'water,' and (paiye<T$ai, 'to 
appear,' because it becomes translucent when immersed in water. A 
var. of opal. 

HYDROPHTTiTTB. J. F, L. Hausmann, 1813, Haus. Min., iii, 
857 (Hydrophilit), f. vdoop and <f>iXo^, 'lover of water,' because of its 
hydroscopic property. A name for calcium chloride. 

EnrDROPHITIS. L. F. Soanberg, 1839, Vet. Ak. Stock, 186 (Hydro- 
phit), f. vdoopy 'water,' and ophite, 'serpentine,' because a serpentinous 
mineral containing much water. A greenish-black mineral, near dewey- 
lite in composition, but containing considerable iron. 

HYDROPHYLUTE. Error for hydrophilite. 

HYDROPITE. E. F. Germar, 1819, Jour. Ch. Ph., xxvi, 115 
(Hydropil), probably f. vSpo-Ttoto?, 'watery,' because it contains water. 
An impure var. of rhodonite. 

HYDROPLUMBITE. M. F. HeddU, 1889, Min. Mag., viii, 203, 
f. its composition. An uncertain mineral, occurring in minute, white 
scales, supposed to be hydrate of lead. 

HTTDROPYRITB. A. Breithaupt, 1874, Frenz. Min. Lex., 201 
(Hydro pyrit), f. its earlier name Wasserkies, G, Agricola, 1546, Agric, 
488 (Wasserkis), which is perhaps a corruption of Weisserkis, * white iron 
pyrites.* Now used for a var. of marcasite said to contain water. 

HYDRORHODONITE. N. Engstrom, 1875, Geol. F5r. F5rh., il, 
469 (Hydro rhodon it), f. its composition. A reddish-brown mineral with 
the composition of rhodonite, but containing one molecule of water. 

HYDRORUTILS. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 28, because a 

mineral containing water, but otherwise similar In composition to rutile. 
Said to be hydrous titanic acid, but neither desciiption nor analysis is 
given. 



HTDROSAMARSEITB 130 HYDROZINOmS 

HYDROSAMARSEITE. A. E. Nordenskiold, 1891, Vet. Ak. Stock. 
Bill., xvii, (2), No. 1, 8 (Hydrosamarskit). A var. of samarskite con- 
taining water. 

HYDROSIDERrrS. E, F. Glocker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 59 (Hydro- 
siderit), f. vSaop, 'water,' and cridrfpo^, 'iron,' alluding to its composition. 
An obs. syn. of liDionite. 

HYDROSUilOITS. W, 8. v. WalUrahausen, 1853, Walt. Vul., 305, 
f . its composition. A hydrous silicate of calcium and magnesium, found 
as an amorphous crust. 

Tlie name hydrosilicite was also used by J, C. F, Kuh, 1827, Ed, New 
Phil. Jour., iii, 385, for a white, amorphous substance which proved to be 
cerolite. 

HYDROSTSATTTE. /. B. Dana, 1850, Dana Min., 252, so called 
because it is a var. of steatite, containing an unusual amount of water. 

HYDROTALO. L. A. Necker, 1835, Neck. Min., ii, 422, f. v5(»p, 
'water,' and talc, because it has the characteristics of anhydrous talc, 
and also those which show the presence of water. An obs. syn. of 
penuinite. 

HYDROTALOITE. Q. Hochstetter, 1842, Jour. Pk. Ch., xxvii, 377 
(Hydrotalkit), f. vdoof), 'water.' and talc, because it resembles talc in 
appearance, but contains much more water. A hydrate of aluminum 
and magnesium, found in pearly-white laminae. 

HYDROTEPHROrrS. L. J, Igelstrdm, 1805, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv.. 
xxii. 605 (Hydrotefroit), f. its composition. A var. of tephroite contain- 
ing some water, probably the result of alteration. 

HYDROTITANITE. G, A, Koenig, 1876, Acad. Nat Sci. Proc, 82, 
so called because it contains titanic acid and water. An altered form of 
dysanalyte, from Arkansas. 

HYDROTTTE. Error for hydrolite. 

HYDROUS ANTHOPHYLLITE. T. ThofMon, 1881, A. J. 8., xix, 
860, f. its resemblance in composition to anthophylllte, except that it con- 
tains water. An alteration product of tremolite, found in fibrous masses. 

HYDROUS lOLITE. T. Thomson, 1836, Thom. Min., i, 278, 
because similar to iolite, but hydrous. One of the many names which 
have been given to the alteration products of iolite resulting from the 
taking up of water. 

HYDROUS MUSOOVTTE. See hydromuscovite. 

HYDROUS PYRITES. See hydropyrite. 

HYDROZINCITE. A, Kenngott, 1858, Kenng. Min., 27 (Hydro- 
zinkit), f . its composition. Hydrous carbonate of zinc, occurring usually 
in chalk-like masses and incrustations. 



HTOROPEOLITE 131 HYSTATITB 



H, Laspeyres, 1873, Min. Mitth., 147 (Hygro- 
philit), f. vypov, * moisture,* and 0/1 o5, 'a lover,' because very bygro- 
flcopic. A bydrous silicate belonging to tbe pinile group, found in 
gi-eeuish scales. 

HYPARGYRITB. E. F. Olocker, 1839. Glock. Min., 280, adapted 
from A. Breithaupfs name, Hypargyronblende, 1832. Breit. Cbar., 286, f. 
vJtOf * less,' and afjyvftoS, ' silver,' because it contains less silver tban some 
otber silver ores. A syn. of miargyrite. 

HYPERSTHSNE. R. J, Hauy, 1806, Lucas Tab., 274, probably f. 
t;;r6p,and (tB4vo^, 'strong above otbers,' indicating that it possesses certain 
qualities in a very high degree, because it is superior in lustre and hardness 
to amphibole, with which it had been confounded. Silicate of iron and 
magnesium, of the pyroxene group, often exhibiting the peculiar metallic 
lustre called schiller. 

HYPOCHLORITE. G. ScMler, 1332, Jour. Ch. Ph., Ixvi, 41 
{Hypochlorit), f. vnox^oopoi, 'greenish -yellow,* alluding to its color. 
A mineral of green color, containing silica, aluminum, bismuth, iron and 
phosphoric acid. 

HYPOSOLBRITB. A. BreiiJiaupt, 1830, Jour. Ch. Ph., Ix, 327 
(Hyposklerit), f. V7t6, * less,* and crKXr^ftoi, * hard,' because it is * half- 
hard,' or less hard than any other feldspar. A blackish green var. of 
albite, not quite so hard as ordinary albite. 

HYPOSTATITB. Probably an error for hystatite. 

HYPOSTILBTTE. F, 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 119, f. 
vnOf 'under,* and stilbite, because it contains less silica than ordinary 
stilbite. A var. of stilbite low in silica. 

HYPOTYPHITB. A, BreithaupU 1874, Jahrb. Min., 667 (Hypo- 
typhit), f. v'KOTv(peiv, 'to smoulder,' because it glows a long time after 
being heated. A name suggested for native arsenic. 

HYPOXANTHTTB. T. H. Rawney, 1855, Ed. New Phil. Jour., ii, 
808, f. vito^avBoi, 'yellowish- brown,* A brownish-yellow clay, proba- 
bly only an impure yellow ochre. 

HYSTATIQUB. ff. W. Bristow, 1861, Brist. Gloss., 187, f. Hysta- 
tisches Karbon-Spath, 1832, Breit. Char., 66, perhaps f. t^orraro?, 'lowest,* 
because it has the lowest rhombohedron of any of the minerals included 
under Karbon-Bpath. The word should have no place among the 
names of mineralogy. 

HYSTATITB. R «. Kobell, 1838. Kob. Min., 818 (Hystatit), f. 
Hystatisches Eisen-Erz, 1830, Breit. Uib., 64, probably f. vardroi, 'low- 
eat,* perhaps because its rhombohedron is lower than that of other similar 
minerals. A var. of menaccanite. 



IBERITB 183 laNATIBFFITB 



L, F. Svanherg, 1844, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., i, 219- 
(Iberit). f. Iberia, the ancient name of Spain, because it was found there. 
An altered iolite, near gigantolite. 

Also used by A, SchlegelmUch, 1810, Acad. St. Pet. Mem., ii, 821, f. 
Iberia, the ancient name of Georgia, because found there. An obscure 
zeoUtic mineral, never fully described. 

lOELAND AGATE. A popular name for obsidian from Iceland. 

ICELAND SPAR. A popular name for transparent calcite used 
for polarizing light, found to j^erfection in Iceland. 

ICE SPAR. A, G. Werner, 1809, Moll Efeni., v, 126 (Eisspath, f. its 
appearance. Glassy oithoclase, first found in the lava of Vesuvius. 

lOHTHYOPHTHALME. See iclithyophthalmite. 

lOHTHYOPHTHALMITE. B. J. d'Andrada, 1800, All. Jour. 
Chem., iv, 8*3 (Ichthyophthalme). f. /;fOJ5, 'a fish,' and 6<pQaXju6s, 'aa 
eye,' alluding to its appearance. A syn. of a]M)phyl]ite. 

IDOORASE. B. J. Hauy, 1796, Jour, des M., v, 260, perhaps f. 
itSoS, 'form,* and KpaaiS, 'a mixture,* because the forms of this sub- 
stance are, in a way, mixtures of others. A syn. of vesuvianite. 

IDRAZITE. A. Sehrauf, 1891, Geol. Reich., xli, 879 (Idrazit), f. 
Idrla, Austria, its locality. A mixture of sulphates, not a simple 
mineral. 

IDRIALINE. See idrialite. 

IDRIALITE. /. Dumas, 1832, Ann. Ch. Phys., 1, 198 (Idrinline), f. 
Idria, Austria, its locality, and Xi^o?. A hydrocarbon found in hepatia 
cinnabar and separated from it by turpentine. 

IDRIATINE. Error for idrialine. 

lEKNTTE. 8. Meunier, 1898, Meun. Pers Met., 40, f. Hassi I§kna, 
Algeria, where it was found. A var of meteoric iron. 

IGELSTROMITE. M. F. Heddle, 1878. Mln. Mag., ii, 108, after 
L. J. IgelstrOm, its discoverer. A syn. of pyroaurite. 

Also used by M. Weibull, 1883, Geol. F6r. F6rh., vi, 500 (IgelstrSmit). 
A var. of knebellte. 

IGLESIASITE. /. /. N. Ruot, 1841, Huot Min., i, 658, f. Iglesias^ 
Sardinia, its locality. A var. of cerussite containing zinc. 

IGIilTE. See igloite. 

IGLOITE. J. Esmark, 1799, Berg. Jour., ii, 100 (Iglit), f. Iglo,^ 
Transylvania, its locality. An obs. syn. of aragonite. 

IGNATIEPFITE. K, K. Flug, [1887, Min. Ges. St. Pet. Verb., 
xxiii, 116], 1887, Zt. Kryst., xiii, 806 (Ignatiewit), after Count N. P. 
Ignatiew, who sent it for analysis. An impure sulphate of aluminum 
and potassium. 



IHLEITB 133 INDIVISIBLB QUARTZ 



A, Schravf, 1877, Jabrb. Miu., 252 (Ibleit), in honor of 
Mine Director Ihle. A hydrous iron sulphate, occurring as a yellow 
e£3orescence on graphite. 

HWAARTTE. Error for ivaarite. 

ILDBFONSITB. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 548 (Ildefon- 
sit), f . Ildefonso, Spain, its locality. A var. of tantalite somewhat harder 
than usual. 

BLBSITB. A. F. Wunsch, [1881, Mining Index. Leadyille, Colo., 
Kov. 5], 1881, Am. Cb. Jour., iii, 420, after Dr. M. W. lies, who first an- 
alyzed it. A hydrous sulphate of manganese, zinc and iron, resulting 
from the decomposition of pyrite and sphalerite. 

ILLUDBRITB. JT. C. v. Leonhard (ascribing the name to the min- 
eral dealers of Vienna), [1806, Leon. Sys. Tab., iv, note 34], 1807, Tasch. 
Min., i, 290 (lUuderit). No derivation suggested. An obs. syn. of zoisite. 

ILMBNITB. A. T. Kupffer, 1827, Arch. Ges. Nat., x, 1 (Ilmenit), f. 
the Ilmen Mts., where it was found. Oxide of iron and titanium, found 
in brilliant, black crystals and in many varieties. 

Also used by H. J. Brooke, 1831, Phil. Mag., x, 187, for the mineral 
afterwards called mengite. 

ILMBNORUnLB. N. J. v. Kokscharow, 1854-57, Koks. Min., ii, 
352. A black var. of rutile from the Ilmen Mts., Russia. 

ILSBMANNITB. H. Hofer, 1871, Jabrb. Min., 566 (Ilsemannit). in 
honor of Mining Commissioner J. C. Ilsemann. An uncertain molyb- 
date of molybdenum, found in deep blue crystals in barite. 

ILVATTB. H. Steffens, 1811, Steff. Orykt., i, 356 (Ilvait), f. Ilva, the 
old name of the island of Elba, where it was found. A black, crystal- 
line silicate of iron and calcium, called also lievrite. 

INDIANATTB. E. F, Cox, 1874, Geol. Surv. Ind., 15, f. Indiana, the 
state in which it was found. A white, porcelain clay, occurring in beds 
several feet in thickness. 

INDIANTTB. J, L. Boumon, [1813. Bourn. Cat.], 1814, Allan Min. 
Nomen., 18, f India, because found there. A var. of anorthite which 
occurs as the gangue of corundum in India. 

INDIOOIilTB. B. J. d^Andrada, 1800, Jour, de Phys., li, 243, f. 
indicum, * indigo,' alluding to its color, and Az19o?. Varieties of tourma- 
line of blue or bluish-black color. 

INDiaO COPPER. A, Breithaupi, 1817, Hoff. Min., iv, (2), 178 
(Kupferindig), alluding to its color. A syn. of covellite. 

INDIGOLITE. Variant of indicolite. 

INDIVISIBLZ2 QUARTZ. R, Jameson, tS20, Jam, Min., i, 283. 
An obs. syn. of opal, so named because it has no cleavage. 



INBSITB 134 IRIDIUM 

INESITE. A, Schneider, 1887, Zt. Geol., xxxix,829 (Inesit), f. xve^, 

* flesh-fibre,* because fouud id fibrous masses of flesh-red color. Hydrous 
silicate of maDgauese and calcium, fouud iu rose-red or flesh-red, fibrous 
masses. 

INFLAMMABLB CINNABAR. A miners' name (Quicksilber- 
Branderz) for the impure mixture of clay, ciunabar, pyrites and gypsum, 
with idrialite; called also hepatic cinnabar. 

INOIilTB. D. (le GalliUen, 1801, Gall. Rec, 135, f . T?, iy6<i, ' muscle/ 
alluding to its fibrous structure, and Az6oS. An obs. syn. of calc- 
sinter. 

lOOHROITB. K. Pipping, 1863, Nord. Fin. Min., 176 (Jochroit). f. 
i'ov, * the vi61et/ and xP^^^y * color,' because it is violet-colored in thin 
splinters. An obscure silicate containing vanadium. 

lODARQYRITE. A. Leymerie, 1859, Ley. Mm., ii, 386, f. iode, 

* iodine,' and apyvpoi, * silver,' because an iodide of silver. A syn. of 
iodyrite. 

lODOHROMATE. A. DieUte, 1891, Zt. Eryst, xix, 449 (Jodchro- 
mate), alluding to its composition. See dietzeite. 

IODIC MERCURY. Syn. of coccinite. 

IODIC SILVER. Syn. of iodyrite. 

lODITE. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 506 (lodit), f. it« com- 
position. A syn. of iodyrite. 

lODOBROMITE. A, f>. Lasaulx, 1878. Jahrb. Min.. 619 (lodobro- 
mit), f. its composition. Chloro-bromo-iodide of silver, found in yellow 
or greenish, octahedral crystals. 

lODOLITE. C. U. Shepard, 1846, A. J. S., 2d, ii, 380, i,too8rf<;, 
'violet,' from its violet-blue color, and AzOo?. The name was soon 
dropped by the author. An alkaline sulphide, thought to have been 
detected in the Bishopville meteorite. 

IODYRITE. J. D. Dana, 1854) Dana Min., 95, f. the earlier name 
iodite, with a syllable added giving it a termination like that of argyrite, 
the original name being one used in chemistry. Native iodide of silver, 
generally of a yellow color. 

lOQUNEITE. Error for jogynaite. 

lOLITE. A, O. Werner, 1807. Tasch. Min., i, 266 (Jolith), f. ibv, 

* violet,' in allusion to its dark blue color, and XiBo?. Silicate of alumi- 
num, iron and magnesium, found in short, orthorhombic crystals, or in 
granular masses. 

lONITE. S. Purnell, 1878, A. J. S., 3d, xvi, 153, f. lona valley, 
Cal., its locality. A brownish-yellow hydrocarbon, found in lignite. 
IRIDIUM. S. Tennant, 1804, Phil. Trans., 411, f. Iris, -idis, in allu- 



IRIDIUM-OSMINB 135 IRON-SINTER 

sion to the beautiful color of its compounds. The native metal, usually 
called native iridium. 

Iridosmine was also formerly called native iridium. 

IRIDIUM-OSMINE. Variant of iridosmine. 

IRIDOSMINE. A, Breithaupt, 1827, Ed. Phil. Jour., iii, 273 (Iridos- 
min), called earlier by K. C. v, Leonhard, 1821, Leon. Orkyt., 173, Osniium- 
Iridium, f. its composition. A native alloy of iridium and osmium, oc- 
curring usually in flattened grains. 

IRIS. A popular name for transparent rock crystals when they 
exhibit the colors of the rainbow. 

IRITE. i?. Hermann, 1841, Jour. Pk. Ch., xxiii, 276 (Irit), because 
it contains iridium. Proved to be a mixture of iridosmine, cbromite and 
other minerals. 

IRON. The metal found as a mineral, usually called native iron. 

IRON-ALUM, a F. Eammelsberg, 1838, Pogg. Ann., xliii, 401 
(Eisen-oxydul-alaun), f. its composition. A syn. of halotrichite. 

IRON-APATITE. J. JV. FucJis, 1839, Jour. Pk. Ch., xviii, 499 
(Eisenapatit), f. its composition and resemblance to apatite. An obs. 
syn. of zwieselite. 

IRON-BORAOITE. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 596, f. Eisen- 
stassfurtit of A. Huyssen, 1865, Jahrb. Min., 329. A name given to 
stassfurtite (boracite), which contains a little iron as an impurity. Called 
also huysseuite. 

IRON-CHRYSOLITE. A syn. of fayalite. 

IRON-FROTH. B, Jameson, 1805, Jam. Min., ii, 285. Jameson's 
translation of the old name, Eisenrahm. An obs. name for micaceous 
hematite. 

IRON-GLANOE. R. Jameson^ 1805, Jam. Min., ii, 276, f. the older 
form, Eisenglanz, which alludes to its appearance. A syn. of the var. 
of hematite commonly called specular iron. 

IRON-MIOA. R Jameson, 1805, Jam. Min., ii, 282, f. the old form. 
Eisenglimmer, which alludes to its appearance. An obs. name for 
micaceous hematite. 

IRON-PYRITES. Prom Eisenkies. See pyrite. 

IRON-RUTILE. E. F. Ohcker, 1839, Glock. Min., 371 (Eisenrutil), 
because a var. of rutile containing much iron. An obs. syn. of nigrine. 

IRON-SOHEFFERITE. See urbanite. 

IRON-SINTER. A. O. Wernei\ 1816, Hoff. Min., iii, (2), 302 (Eisen- 
sinter), f. its appearance and composition. A syn. of pitticite. 

Also used by G, F, Rammelsberg, 1845, Ramm. Min. Ch. Supp., ii, 46. 
An amorphous var. of scorodite. 



IRON-SPAR 186 

IRON-SPAR. J, F, L, Harmnann, 1818, Haus. Min., iii, 952 
(Eisenspatb), f. the earlier name, Spatheisenstein, because it is a spar con- 
taining iron. An obs. syn. of siderite. 

IRON-SPINEL. A syn. of bercynite. 

'IRON- VITRIOL. From Vitriolum f erri, an old name wbich Included 
various members of the copperas group. 

ISABELLITB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 4, f. its color. A 

syn. of lichterite, which sometimes is of an isabella-yellow color. 

ISOHELITB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 62, f. Ischl, Austria, 

its locality. A syn. of polyhalite. 

ISERINB. See iserite. 

ISERrrS. A. Q. Werner, [1797, Reuss B5h., ii, 248], 1803, Reuss 
Min., iv, (2), 598 (Iseriu), f. Iserwiese, Bohemia, its locality. A var. of 
ilmenite, found as a black, crystalline sand. 

ISINGLASS. An early popular name for mica. 

ISOOLASITB. F, «. Sandherger, 1870, Jour. Pk. Ch., ii, 125 (Iso- 
klas), f. iVroS, * equal,* and kXoco-i?, 'fracture,' because it cleaves about as 
easily as selenite. Hydrous phosphiite of calcium, found in minute, 
snow-white crystals. 

ISOPHANE. E. F. Olocker, 1839, Glock. Min., 353 (Isophan), f. 
A. BreithaupVs early name, 1830, Breit. Uib., 64, Isophanes Eisen-Erz, 
probably f. i(To-(f>dvU, 'appearing like,' because closely resembling 
franklinite. A doubtful mineral, near franklinite, both its composition 
and locality being unknown. 

ISOPYRS. W. Haidinger, 1827, Ed. Phil. Jour., iii, 263, f. icro^, 
Mike,' and itvp, 'fire,' because its appearance is not changed by heat. 
An impure opal, long considered a distinct mineral. 

ITTNBRITB. J. F. Omelin, 1822. Jour. Ch. Ph , xxxvi, 85 (Ittnerit), 
in honor of Prof. F. von Ittner, wlio discovered it. An alteration prod- 
uct from hftllyuile, containing much water. 

IVAARITE. S. Kutorga. 1850-51, Min. Ges. St. Pet , 327 (Iwaarit), 
f. Ivaara, Finland, its locality. A black mineral very near schorlomite. 
sohorloniite. 

IViaXITB. T. D. Rand, 1868. Acad. Nat. Sci. Proc, 142, f. 
Ivigtuk, Greenland, its locality. A greenish -yellow, micaceous mineral, 
near gilbertite. 

IWAARITE. See ivaarite. 

IZIOLITS. A. E, NordensMold, 1857, Pogg. Ann., ci, 632 (Ixiolit)^ 
f. Ixion, probably because of the well-understood connection betweeli 
Ixion and Tantalus, and Az6o?. A mineral near tantalite, but separated 
from it on account of a difference in its crystalline form. F, J, WUk, 
1891, Jarhb. Min., ii. 253. uses the form Ixionolite. 



IXOLTTB 187 JARROWTTE 

IXOLTTE. W, Hatdinger, 1842, Fogg, Ann., Ivi, 345 (Ixolyt). f. 
£^6?, *a sticky substance.' and Xveiv, *to dissolve,' because although it 
softens at 76°, it will stretch out into threads at 100°. A soft, red hydro- 
carbon, resembling hartlte. 

IZIONOUTE. See ixiolite. 

JACINTH. An early form of hyacinth. 

JAOESONITX!. J. D, Wiitney, 1847, Jour. Nat. Hist, v, 487, in 
honor of Dr. Chas. T. Jackson. A syn. of prehnite. 

JAOOBSITE. A, Damour, 1869, C. R., Ixix, 168, f. Jakobsberg, 
Sweden, its locality. An iron-manganese spinel, occurring in brilliant, 
black, octahedral crystals. 

JADE. Said to be from piedra de yjada, ' stone of the side,' because 
used as a remedy for kidney troubles. A general name for various min- 
•erals which from their hardness have been used for utensils and ornaments. 
It properly includes nephrite and jadeiteonly. 

JADEITE. A. Damour, 1863, C. R., Ivi, 865, f. jade, but limiting the 
name to one of the substances formerly included under it. A silicate of 
sodium and aluminum ; a soda spodumine. It is the hardest and most 
highly prized variety of jade. 

JAIPURITE. F. R. Mallet, [1880. Geol. Surv. Ind. Rec, xiv, 190], 
1887, Min. Ind., 16, f. Jaipur, its locality. From other spellings of the 
name of this place it has been called syepoorite, J, Nicol, 1849, Nicol Min., 
458, and jeypoorite, W. A. Boss, 1873, Roy. Soc, xxi., 292. Said to be 
sulphide of cobalt, occurring massive, of a steel gray color, but its existence 
is questioned by Mallet, who had failed to find it. 

JALPAITE. A. Breithaupt, 1858, Berg. HUt., xvii, 85 (Jalpait), f. 
Jalpa, Mexico, its locality. A var. of argentite containing copper. 

JAMESONITE. W. Eaidinger, 1825, Haid. Mobs, i, 451, after 
Prof. R. Jameson, who had described it. Sulph-antimonide of lead, 
usually occurring in fibrous masses and often called feather ore. 

JANOLITE. Error for yanolite. 

JAROIONITE. Error for targionite. 

JARGON. The old form of zircon, still used by jewelers for color- 
less and smoky varieties. 

JARQOON. Variant of jargon. 

JAROSITE. A. Breithaupt, 1852, Berg. Httt., vi, 68 (Jarosit), f. Bar- 
ranco Jaroso, Spain, its locality. Ferric sulphate, containing potassium 
and sodium, found in yellow, fibrous mT-sses. 

JARROWITE. G. A. Lehour, 1888, Brit. Assoc. Rept. for 1887, f. 
Jarrow-on-the-Tyne, its locality. A syn. of thinolite. 



JASP-AGATB 138 JBYPOORITS 

JASP-AOATB. Pliny, 77, Pliny Hist., Bk. 37, 139 (Jaspachates). 
One of Pliny's varieties of agate, without descriptioD. 

JASPER. From laaitiS, a precious stone of the ancients. An 
opaque var. of quartz, found in many colors. 

JASP-ONYZ. An old name for clouded jasper. 

JASP.OPAL. D. L. G. Karaten, 1808, Karst. Tab., 26. Variant 
of opal-jasper. 

JBAT. Variant of jet. 

JBFFERISITB. Q. J. Brush, 1866, A. J. S., 2d, xli, 248, after W. 
W. Jefferis, its discoverer. A hydrous silicate of aluminum, iron and mag- 
nesium, found in foliated crystals, like mica, and which exfoliates in a 
remarkable manner when heated. 

JEFFERSONITE. TF. U. Keating and L. Vanuxen, 1822, Acad. 
Nat. Sci. Jour., ii, 194, in honor of Mr. Jefferson, probably President 
Jefferson. A greenish-black var. of pyroxene, containing some zinc. 

JBFREINOFFITB. See jevreinovite. 

JELLELITB. Error for jelletite. 

JELLESITE. Error for jelletite. 

JELLETITE. J. Apjohn, 1853, Geol. Soc. Dubl., v, 119, after the 
Rev. J. H. Jellet, who aided in its examination. A greenish sub- var. of 
garnet from Switzerland. 

JENITE. See yenite. 

JENKINSITE. a U. Sliepard, 1852, A. J. S., 2d, xiii, 392, after 
John Jenkins, from whom it was obtained. A var. of hydrophite, occur- 
ring as a fibrous incrustation on iron ore. 

JENZSOHITE. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 201, after G. Jenzsch, 
who first described it. A name for some varieties of opal which have 
the specific gravity of quartz, but are soluble in caustic potash. 

JEREMEIEVITE. A, Damour, 1883, Bull. Soc. Min., vi, 20 
(Jeremeiwite), after P. von Jeremeiv. who first brought it to notice. 
Borate of aluminum and iron, forming the outside of colorless, transparent, 
hexagonal prisms, the inside of which is eichwaldite. 

JET. From yayarys, * stone of Payai,' because found there. A 
very compact var. of mineral coal, often used as an ornamental stone. 

JEVREINOVITE. iV. Nordenskidld, 1853, Koks. Min., i, lift 
(Jewreinowit), in honor of Col. P. v. Jevreinov. A var. of vesuvian- 
ite, containing little magnesia. 

JEWELUTE. 8. Meunier, 1893, Meun. Pers Met., 37, f. Jewell 
Hill, N. C, where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 

JEWREINOWITE. See jevreinovite. 

JEYPOORITE. See jaipurite. 



JOGYNATTE 139 JULIANTTB 

JOGYNAITB. N. Nordenskiold, 1849, Nord. Atom. Cb. Min. 
Syst., 104 (Jogynait),J. ioi, 'poison,' aud yvv?), 'woman,' because a 
poisonous matrix, ' gifteges Mutlergestein.' A decomposition product 
of arsenop3'rite. resembling earthy scorodite. 

JOHANNITB. W, Ilaidinger, [1830, B5h. Ges. Abh.], 1837, Phil. 
Min., 271, in honor of the Archduke Johann, of Austria. Uranium 
sulphate containing some copper, found in green druses. 

JOHNTTB. G. Fiaclier v. WaldTieim, [1806, Soc. Nat. Mosc. Mem., 
i, 149], 1816, Fisch. Turq., 35 (Johnite), in honor of Prof. J. F. John, of 
Berlin. A syn. of turquoise. 

JOHNSTONITB. W. ffaidinger. 1845. Haid. Handb., 666, after 
Prof. J. F. W. Johnston, who had analyzed it. A var. of galenite 
containing an excess of sulphur, called earlier supersulphuretted lead. 

Also used by E. J, Chapman, 1843, Chap. Min., 42. An obs. syn. of 
vanadinite. 

JOHNSTRUPITB. W. G. Brogger, 1890, Zt. Kryst., xvi, (2), 74 
(Johnstrupit), in honor of Prof. Fr. Johnstrup, of Copenhagen. A very 
complicated silicate of calcium, sodium and the cerium metals, found in 
brownish-green, prismatic crystals. 

JOLITB. Often used for iolite. 

JOLLITB. Variant of jollyte. 

JOLLYLITB. Error for jollyte. 

JOLLYTE. F. V. Kohell, 1865, K. Ak. Mtlnch., i, 168 (Jollyt), in 
honor of Prof. P. G. Jolly, of Munich. Hydrous silicate of aluminum, 
iron and magnesium, occurring in compact, amorphous, dark brown 
masses. 

JORDANTTB. Q. wmBaih, [1864, Nied. Ges. Bonn, xxi, 34], 1864, 
Pogg. Ann., cxxii, 387 (Jordanit), after Dr. Jordan, of Saarbrucken, from 
whom it was received. A sulph-antimonide of lead, occurring in twin 
crystals. 

JOSEITB. A. KenngotU 1853, Kenng. Min., 121 (JosCit), f. San 
Jose, Brazil, its locality. Telluride of bismuth, found in grayish-black, 
laminated masses. 

JOSBPHINTTB. TT. H, Melville, 1892, A. J. S., 3d, xliii, 509, f. 
Josephine Co., Ore., its locality. A nickel iron, perhaps of meteoric 
origin, found in placer deposits. 

JOSSAITB. A. BreiViaupt, 1858, Berg Hat.,xvii, 54 (Jossait), after 
Major- General von Jossa, from whom the specimen was obtained. An 
obscure mineral, found in small, orange-yellow crystals, consisting of 
chromate of lead and zinc. 

JULIANTTB. M. Websky, 1871, Zt. Geol., xxiii, 486 (Julianit), f. the 



JUNOKERim 140 EALEMAGNBSITB 

Friedrich-Julian mine, Rudelstadt, Silesia, its locality. A syn. of 
teoDantite. 

JUNOEBRirS. A. Bufrenoy, 1834, Ann. Ch. Pbys.. Ivi, 198, in 

honor of Juncker, director of the mine where it was found. An 

obs. syn. of siderite. 

JURINITB. F, J. SoreU [1822], 1868, Dana Min., 164, probably in 
honor of L. Jurine. An obs. syn. of brookite. 

EABAIT£. a U. Shepard, 1867. A. J. S , 2d, xliii, 1?8, f. Knba, 
Hungary, its locality. A name given to the petroleum found in a mete- 
orite. 

KABRSUTITB. J. Loremen, [1884, Medd. GrOnl., vii, 27], 1885, 
Zt. Kryst., xi, 318, f. Kaersut, North Greenland, its locality. A black 
amphibole, containing a large amount of titanium. 

EAINITB. a F. Zincken, 1865, Berg. HUt., xxiv, 79 (Kainit), f. 
Kaivo^, 'recent,* alluding to its recent formation. Hydrous chloro- 
sulphate of magnesium and potassium, found in large quantities at 
fltassfurt, Prussia. 

EAINOSITB. See cenosite. 

EAEOOHLORB. A. Breithaupt, 1832. Breit. Char., 240 (Kakochlor), 
perhaps f. kcxku?, ' bad,' and chlor, because it is a manganese mineral not 
^ood for making chlorine. A syn. of asbolite, earthy cobalt. 

EAEOZENB. See cacoxenite. 

SALIBORITB. W. Feit, 1889, Chem. Zeit., xiii, 1188, f. kalium 
and boron, alluding to its composition. A syn. of heintzite. 

EALIOINE. F. Pisani, 1865. C. R., Ix, 918. f. kalium, 'potassium/ 
because it contains it. A native acid potassium carbonate, of recent 
formation. 

SALINITE. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 652, f. kalium, 'potas- 
sium.' Native potash alum, found as an efflorescence or crust, of white 
or yellowish color. 

EALIOPHILITX!. B. Mierisch, 1886. Min. Mitth.. viii. 160 (Kali- 
ophilit), f. kalium, and (piXoS, *a friend,' because it contains so much 
potash. Silicate of aluminum and potassium, found in bundles of 
fascicular crystals and in fine threads. 

EALIPHITI!. Ivanov, 1844, Ann. du Jour, des Mines de Russie 

for 1841, 338. Derivation not given. A mixture of limonite, oxide 
of manganese, silicate of zinc and lime. 

EALEOANORINITS. J. Lemberg, 1876. Zt. Geol., xxviii. 582, f. 
its composition. A var. of cancrinite in which lime replaces the soda. 

SAIiEHARMOTOME. See lime-harmotome. 

EALEMAGNESITE. /. F. L. Hausmann, 1847. Haus. Min., iii. 



EAI.EMALAOHITE 141 EARELINTTE 

1404 (Kalkmagnesit), alluding to its supposed composition. A syn. of 
hydrodolomite. 

EAIiEMALAOHmi. See lime-malachite. 

EALETRIPLmi. EiTor for talktriplite. 

KALEWAVELLITS. See lime-wavellite. 

EALLILITXI. H. Laspeyres, 1891. Zt. Kryst., xix, 12 (Kallilith), f. 
KixXXi' (in composition), 'beautiful,* and A/So?, because it comes from 
Sch5nstein-on-tbe-Sieg, Germany. Sulphide of bismuth and nickel, near 
ullmannite. 

EALUSZITS. J. Eumpf, 1872, Min. Mittb., 117 (Kaluszit). f. 
Kalusz, Gallicia, its locality. An obs. syn. of syngeuite. 

EAMAOrrE. K. V. Eeichenbach, 1861, Pogg. Ann., cxiv, 99 (Kam- 
acit), f. KaiLta^,-aKos, *a pole,' from the shape of its crystals. A var. 
of meteoric iron, earlier called Balkeneisen. 

EAMAREZTTE. K, Busz, 1895, Jabrb. Min., i. 111 (Kamarezit), f. 
Kamareza, Attica, its locality. Hydrous sulpbate of copper, resem- 
bling brochantite, but containing more water. 

EAMMERERITE. N. Nordenakiold, 1842 (read 1841), Soc. Sci. 
Penn., i, 483 (Kammererit), in honor of Dr. A. A. Kammerer, of St. Pe- 
tersburg. A var. of peuninite, occurring iu rL-dilisli, crystalline scales, 
often with chromic iron. 

EANEITX!. W. Haidtnger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 559 (Kaneit), after 
R. J. Kane, who first described it. A doubtful arsenide of manganese, 
of grayish-white color. 

EAOLIN. An old name for porcelain-clay, said to be a corruption of 
Eauling, the Chinese name of the original locality. 

EAOLINITXI. 8. W. Johnson, 1867, A. J. S., 2d, xliii, 351, f. kaolin, 
the earlier form. Porcelain clay, found in masses of minute crystalline 
scales, and including several varieties. 

KAPNIOITB. A, KenngotU 1856, Kenng. Ueb. for 1855, 19 (Kapni- 
cit), f. Kapnik, Hungary, its locality. An obs. syn. of wavellite. 

EAPNIEITE. J. J. N. Huoi, 1841, Huot Min., i, 239, f. Kapnik, 
Hungary, its locality. An obs. syn. of rhodonite. 

EAPNTTXI. See capnite. 

EARAMSINITE. N. Noi'denskidld, 1860, Ramm. Min. Ch., 776 
(Karamsinit), in bonor of Col. Karamsin, Mine Director at Nischne Tagilsk, 
Ural. An obscure mineral supposed to be from Finland, containing 
silica, lime, potassa, copper and other bases. 

KARARFVEITE. F. Radominski, 1874, C. R., Ixxviii, 764 (Korarf- 
veite), f. KS-rarfet, Sweden, its locality An impure var. of monazite. 

EARBLINITB. R, Hermann, 1858, Jour. Pk. Ch., Ixxv, 448 (Kare- 



KARSTENTTB 142 EBNTROLTTB 

linit), after Karelin, its discoverer. A doubtful suboxide of bismuth, 

of a lead-gray color. 

KARSTBNITB. J, F. L. Hausmann, 1813, Haus. Min., lii, 880 (Kar- 
stenit), iu honor of Dr. D. L. G. Karsteu. An obs. syn. of anhydrite. 

KAR8TIN. J. Noggerath, [1812, Moll Neue Jahrb., ii, (3), 379], 1814, 
Ullm. Tab., 459, in honor of Dr. D. L. G. Karsten. An obs. syn. of 
ottrelite. 

KARSUTITE. Variaot of kaersutite. 

SARYOOERITE. See curyocerite. 

SASTOR. See castorite. 

EAUAnTE. E. Goldsmith, 1894, Acad. Nat. Sci. Proc, 105, f. Kauai, 
Sandwich Isl., where it was found. Hydrous sulphate of aluminum and 
potassium, found in a crater and lookiug like chalk. 

KBATINGINB. G. U. JShepard, 1876, Shep. Cout. Min., 1, iu honor 
of Prof. W. 11. Kealiiig, who was one of the first to examine the minerals 
of Franklin Furnace, N. J. A syn. of fowlerite. 

EBATINGITB. Variant of keatingine. 

EEFFBEILITE. Q. Fischer v, Waldlieim, 1806, Soc. Nat. Mosc. 
Mem., i, 63 (Keffekilith), probably f. Keffekill, the old name of meer- 
schaum. A gray, clay-like mineral from the Crimea, probably a mixture. 

EEFFEKUiL. U. Kirwan, 1784, Kirw. Min., 59, said to mean the 
earth of Keffe or Kaffe, the town of the Crimea from which it was shipped. 
The old name for meerschaum. 

KEHOBITE. W. P. Headden, 1893, A. J. S., 3d, xlvi. 22, after 
Henry Kehoe, who first observed it. Hydrous phosphate of aluminum 
and zinc, amorphous, and white iu color. 

KBILHAUITB. A. Erdmanii, 1844, Vet. Ak. Stock., 361 (Keilhauit), 
in honor of Prof. B. M. Keilhau, of Norway. A titan o-silicate of cal- 
cium and other metals, including the yttrium metals. 

KEITYOITB. Error for kielyoite. 

KBLYPHITB. A. Schrauf, 1879, Geol. Reich. Verb., 244 (Kelyphit). 
f. Ke\v(po<5, *a nutshell,' because it forms the outer covering of a nucleus 
of pyrope. An uncertain alteration product. 

KENDALLITB. 8. Meunier, 1898, Meun. Pers Met., 67, f. Ken- 
dall, Tex., where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 

KBNNOOTTITB. W. Haidinger, 1857, K. Ak. Wien, xxii. 23ft 
(Kenngottit), after Prof. G. A. Kenugott, who first described it. A syn. 
of miargyrite. 

KBNTROLITB. A. Damaur and G. vom Rath, 1880, Zt. Kryst., v, 
33 (Kentrolith), f. Kivrpov, *a sharp point,' on account of the prickly 
appearance of an aggregation of its crystals, and AiSoJ. Silicate of lead 



KERAMITS 143 EIDNBY-STONB 

and mungauese, found in small, prismatic crystals, often in shcaf-like 
Aggregations. 

EERAMITE. T, 8, Hunt, 1886, Hunt Pbys., 371, f. Ke/jdjuo^, 
* potters' clay.' A clay resulting from the decay of scapolite, sometimes 
retaining the form of the original crystal. 

EERAMOHALrrS. See ceramohalite. 

EERAPHYLIilTE. H. Steffens, 1811, Steff. Orykt., i, 303 (Keraphyl- 
lit), f. Kepas, • horn,* and (puXXor, * a leaf,' because of its nearness to horn- 
blende and its foliated structure. An obs. syn. of carinthine. 

EERATOPHYLLITE. Variant of keraphyllite. 

EERARGYRITE. See cerargyrite. 

KBRATB. W. Eaidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 506 (Kerat), f. 
icdpai, -aro?, 'horn.' An obs syn. of cerargyrite, hom-silver. 

EERATTTB. J. C. Delametherie, 1806, Jour, de Phys., Ixu, 349 
(Keratit), f. Kepa^, -aro?, * horn.' An obs. syn. of hornstone. 

EERMES. See kermesite. 

EERMESITE. F, 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 617 (Kermis), f. 
kermes, the old chemical name for the artificial substance. The present 
form was given by E, J, Chapman, 1843, Chap. Min., 61. Oxy-sulphide 
of antimony, occurring usually in cherry-red, capillary crystals. 

EERMESOMX!. Variant of kermesite. 

EEROLITE. See cerolite. 

EERRITE. F, A, Oenth, 1873, Am. Phil. Soc., xiii, 896, in honor 
of Prof. W. C. Kerr, State Geologist of North Carolina. A greenish- 
yellow mineral from North Carolina, occurring in fine scales, apparently 
resulting from the decomposition of chlonte. 

EERSTENTTE. TT. Eaidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 560 (Kerstenit) 
after Prof. Carl M. Kersten, who first described it. Smaltite or speis- 
kobalt supposed to contain bismuth, and therefore called by Eersten 
Wismuthkobaltkies. 

Also used by J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 669. Selenate of lead, 
found in small spheres and botiyoidal masses of a sulphur-yellow color, 
never fully examined. 

EIBDELOPHANE. F. v. Kohell, 1832, Jour. Ch. Ph., Ixiv, 245 
(Kibdelophan), f. KifiSy/Xoi, 'deceiving,' and (pcxtveaBai, 'to appear, 
because of its very close resemblance to ilmenite. The var. of ilmenite 
which contains the largest proportion of titanic acid. 

EIDNEY-ORE. An early name for hematite when found in renlform 
shapes. 

EIDNEY-STONE. A popular translation of lapis nephriticus. See 
nephrite. 



KmSELAIiUBftlNrrX! 144 KLAFROTHTTB 

EXESSLAliUMINITX!. Groningen and A. Oppel, [1851, Wllrt. 

Nat. Jabres., 189], ia02. Jabres. Cb. Ph. Mio.. 8»3 (Kiesel Aliimiuit), f. 
its composition. A mixture of allopbaue and aluminiie, later called 
sulfatullopban. 

KIESBRmi. E, Beiehardt, 1861, Berg. HQt., xx, 39 (Kieserit), in 
honor of D. G. Kieser, President of the Jenu Academy. Hydrous 
magnesium sulphate, usually found in fine, granular, white masses. 

KIZ2TTOGITX!. Error for kietyoite. 

KIBTYOITB. A. E. Nordenskiold, 1863, Xord. Fin. Min.. 154 
(Kielyoit), f. Kietyo. Finland, its locality. A bluish green var. of 
apatite. 

EUiBRKCKENITB. J. Ajffolin, 1840. Roy. Ir. Ac. Proc.. i. 472, f. 
Kilbricken lend mine. County Clare, Ireland, its locality. Sulph-anti- 
monide of lead, of a lead-gray color and metallic lustre. 

EUiLINITB. T/108, Taylor. 1818 (read 1817), Roy. Ir. Ac. Trans., 
xiii, 4, f. Killiuey Bay, Ireland, its locality. An alteration product of 
spodumine, in which the structure of the original crystal is preserved. 

EUiMAOOOITX!. C. R. C. Tielibarne, 1885, Soc. Dub. Proc. Iv, 
300, f. Kilmacoo district, Ireland, its locality. A fine-grained mixture 
of galenite and sphalerite, locally called blue-stone. 

EIMITOTANTAIJTX!. J. J, Berzeliua, 1828, Pogg. Ann., Ixxxvii. 
27 (Kimito-Tantalit), f. its locality, Kimito, Finland. A var. of tanta- 
lite now classed under ixiolite. 

EIRGHISITE. Treutler, 1820, Zt. Nat. Heil., i, 177 (Kirgisit), 

f. the Kirghese steppes, Siberia, its locality. An obs. syn. of dioptase. 

KIRWANITS. T, Thomson, [1831. Bryce Tab.], 1833, Phil. Mag., 
3(1, iii, 85, in honor of R. Kirwan, the Irish mineralogist. A fibrous, 
chlorite-like mineral, resulting from the alteration of amphibole. 

KISCHTIMITX!. G. J. Brush, 1863, A. J. S., 2d, xxxv, 427, f. 
Kischtim Parisit of Th, Korovaeff, 1862 (read 1861), Acad. St. Pet. Bull., 
iv. 401, because it is a mineral resembling parisite. from the district of 
Kyschtymsk, Ural. A tiuo-curbonate of the cerium metals, closely 
resembling parisite. 

KISCHTIM-PARISITB. See kischtimite. 

EJHRULFINE. F. v. Kohell 1873, Jour. Pk. Ch., vii, 272 (Kjerul- 
fin), in honor of Prof. T. H. Kjerulf, of Norway. A var. of wagnerite, 
occurring in large crystals and cleavable masses. 

ELAPROTHINE. Variant of klaprothite (de Dree). 

ELAPROTHITX!. E. de Dree, 1811, Dree Cat., 20, in honor of 
Prof. M. H. Klaproth. An obs. syn. of lazulite. 

See also klaprotholite. 



KLAPROTHOUTE 145 EOSNIQITXI 

^LAPROTHOLITB. G. J, Brush, 1872, Dana Min., App. i, 8, 
altered from klaprothite of T. Petersen and F, v, Sandbejger, 1868, Jahrb. 
Min., 415, on account of its earlier use. Sulphide of bismuth and 
copper, found in orthorhombic crystals of steel-gray color. 

ELEMENTITE. G. Tschermak, 1891, K. Ak. Wien, c, (1), 40 
(Klementit), after Dr. C. Klement, of Brussels, who analyzed it. A 
chlorite-like mineral, found in dark, olive-green scales in quartz veins. 

KLIPSTBINITB. F, v. Kohell, 1866, Jour. Pk. Ch., xcvii, 180 
(Klipsteiuit), after Prof. August von Klipstein, of Giesseu, its discoverer. 
A hydrous silicate of manganese and iron, and of dark brown color and re- 
sulting from the alteration of rhodonite. 

KNAUFFITB. Plarier, [1849, Arch. Wiss. Kund., viii, 135], 

1852, Kenng. Ueb. for 1844r-49, 61 (Knaufflt), after Knauff, owner of 

furnaces where it was found. An obs. syn. of volborthite. 

ENBBEIiITB. J. W. Dobereiner, 1817, Jour. Ch. Ph., xxi, 49 
(Knebelit), in honor of Major von Enebel. Hydrous silicate of iron and 
manganese, of a red-brown or black color. 

ENOPITB. P.J. HolmquisU 1894, Geol. F5r. F5rh., xvi, 73 (Knopit), 
in honor of Prof. A. Knop. Titanite of calcium, near perofskite, but 
containing cerium. 

ENOZVIIiUTB. G, F, Becker, 1889, Geol. Surv. U. S. Men., 13, 
343, f. Knoxville, Cal., its locality. Hydrous sulphate of chromium, 
iron and aluminum, of a greenish-jfellow color. 

EOBBLLITB. J. Setterherg, 1839, Vet. Ak. Stock., 188 (Kobellit), 
in honor of Prof. Franz von Eobell. Sulph-antimonide of bismuth and 
lead, occurring in radiated masses of a lead-gray color. 

EOBOLDINB. F. 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 417, f. kobold. 
* cobalt,' from its composition. An obs. syn. of linnaeite. 

EOOHBLITB. M. Websky, 1868, Zt. Geol., xx, 250 (Kochelit), f. 
Kochelwiese, Silesia, its locality. A complex col um bate, near fergusonite. 

EaSFLAOHTTB. C. Ddlt&i\ [1878, Mitt. d. Naturw. Ver. f. Steier- 
mark], 1880, Jahrb. Min., ii, 152 (KOflachit), f. K5flach, Styria, its locality. 
A dark brown resin extracted from brown coal. 

Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 71, after Prof. F. 



W. Koehler, who first analyzed it. An obs. syn. of onofrite. 

EaSLBINGITB. A. Breithaupt, 1865, Berg. Hftt., xxiv, 398, in 
honor of K5lbing, of Herrnhut. A syn. of senigmatite. 

ECBNiaiNB. See koenigite. 

ECBNiaiTB. A, Levy, 1826, Ann. Phil., xi, 194(K5nigine), in honor 
of Carl E5nig, curator of the mineral collections of the Bdtish Museum. 
An obs. syn. of brochantite. 



EGBNLEINITX! 146 KOREIITB 

EaSNL£INITE. E. Kraus, 1838. Fogg. Ann., xliii, 141 (KSnleinit), 
after Supt. Eoenlein, its discoverer. A reddish-brown liydrocarbon, 
found in the brown coal of Uznacb, Switzerland. 

ECENIilNITXI. Yuriuut of koenleinite. 

EQSNLITE. Variant of koenleinite. 

KCETTIGITB. J.B. Dana, 1850, Dana Min., 487. after O. K5ttig, 
who first described it. Hydrous arsenate of zinc, cobalt and nickel, 
found in red incrustations with a silky lustre. 

EOFLAOHITE. See koeflachite. 

SOHLERITE. See koeblerite. 

EOIREIITE Seekoreite. 

EOIREITE. Variant of koreite. 

EOESOHAROFFITE. N. Nordenskidld, 1857, Soc. Nat. Mose. 
Bull., XXX, 216 (Kokscharowit), in honor of N. J. von Eokscharov. A 
var. of edenite, from the neighborhood of Lake Baikal, Siberia. 

EdLBINGITE. See koelbingite. 

EOIiLOPHAN. See collophanite. 

KOLOSORUKITB. A. Weisbaeh, 1875, Weis. Syn., 42 (Kolosorukit), 
f. Kolosoruk, Bohemia, its locality. A var. of jarosite, containing less 
than the normal amount of iron. 

KONOSBERQITB. F, Pisani, 1872, C. R., Ixxv, 1274, f. Kongs- 
berg. Norway, its locality. The var. of amalgam containing the largest 
percentage of silver. 

EONIGINB. See koenigite. 

EONIGITB. Variant of koenigite. 

EONILITB. J. McCvllough, 1821, Quar. Jour., xi, 219, f. kovi^, 
* powder,' and Ai0o?. Silica in the form of powder, found in cavities 
within zeolites. At first called conite, but changed on account of the 
earlier use of that name. 

EONINCEITB. Q. Cesaro, 1884, Soc. Geol. Belg. Mem., xi. 247, in 
honor of Prof. L. G. de Koninck, of Li^ge. Hydrous phosphate of 
iron, occurring in small, globular forms made up of radiating needles. 

EONLEINITB. See koenleinite. 

EONLITB. Variant of koenlite. 

EOODILITE. A. Bufrenoy, 1847, Duf. Min , iii, 766. Derivation 
not given. An impure var. of thomsonite. 

EOPPITB. A, Knop, 1875, Jahrb. Min., 67 (Koppit), in honor of 
Prof. Hermann Eopp. Columbate of calcium, sodium and the cerium 
metals, found in transparent, brown crystals. 

EORARFVBITB. See k§,rarfveite. 

SORBIITB. Variant of koreite. 



HOREVrH 147 EREMSRSITX! 

KOREITB. J. a Delamethene, 1795, Delam. T. T., iii. 465 (Koireiite), 
f. Xoif)€ioS, * of a swine,' because it feels greasy. An obs. syn. of agal- 
matolite. 

KORITE. W. 8. V. Waltershausen, 1853, Walt. Vul., 219 (Korit), f. 
Kopa, the Attic name of Persephone. One of the hypothetical varieties 
of palagonite from Sicily, now considered a rock rather than a mineral. 

KORNEIilTB. /. A. Krenner, [1888, F51d. Koz.]. 1893, Dana Min., 
:9o7 (Kornelit). A hydrous ferric sulphate. 

EORNERUFIN. J. Lm-emen, [1884. Medd. Gr5nl., vii, 19], 1885, 
Zt. Kryst., xi, 315, in honor of A. N. Koruerup, a Danish geologist. A 
silicate of aluminum and magnesium, somewhat like sillimanite, found in 
plasmatic aggregates. 

EORNITE. A. BreithaupU 1830, Breit. Uib., 40 (Komit), f. comus, 
*a horn.' An obs. name for hornstone. 

EORYINITE. See caryinite. 

KOTSOHUBBITB. N. J. v. Kokscharov, 1863, Acad. St. Pet. 
Bull.. V, 369 (read 1861) (Kotschubeit), in honor of P. A. v. Kochubey. 
A rose-red var. of clinochlore from the Urals. 

EOTTIGITB. Variant of koettigite. 

EOUUBINITB. JUi. J, v. Kokscharov, 1862, Koks. Min., iv, 281 
(Eoulibinit), in honor of Mining Engineer A. v. Eulibin. An uncertain 
mineral, probably a kind of pitchstone. 

KOUPHOLITB. Picot de la Peyrouse, 1797, Delam. T. T., ii, 547, f. 
Kov<p6i, • light,' because so light in weight, and Az0o?. An obs. syn. of 
prehnite. 

ERABIilTB. J. O. Forchhammer, 1844, Berz. Jahres, xziii, 262 (Erab- 
lit). f. Erabla. Iceland (properly Erafla, hence kraflite), its locality. An 
impure orthoclase, its crystals enclosing quartz and other minerals. 

ERAFLITB. See krablite. 

ERAHLITB. Error for krablite. 

ERANTZITB. C. Bergemann, 1859, Jour. Pk. Ch., Ixxvi, 65 
(Erantzit), in honor of Dr. Krantz, who had studied fossil coals. A fossil 
resin, near amber, found in small, yellowish grains. 

KRAURITB. A. Breithaupt, 1841, Breit. Handb., ii, 152 (Erauiit), 
f. Kpavpo'i, * brittle,' because it is very brittle. A syn. of dufrenite. 

KREITTONITB. F. v. Kobell, 1848, Jour. Pk. Ch., xliv, 99 (Ereit- 
tonit), f. Kpeirroov, 'stronger, superior,' because it has a higher specific 
gravity than other spinels. Suggested by A. BreiihaupVs earlier name, 
Spinellus superius, 1847, Breit. Handb., iii, 628. One of the varieties of 
gahnite, zinc spiuel, containing considerable iron. 

EREMERSITB. A. EenngoU, 1853, Eenng. Min., 9 (Eremersit), 



ERCNNSRITS 148 

after Dr. P. Kreraers, who first described it. Hydrous chloride of irou^ 
potassium and unimoDium, from the fumeroles of Vesuvius. 

KRENNSRITS. G. torn Rath, 1877, Ak. Ber. Monat.. 292 (KKcn- 
nerit), after Dr. J. A. Kreuner. who first described it. A telluride of 
gold and silver, found in prismatic crystals. 

ERISUViarrS. J. O, Forchltammer, [1842, Skand. Nat.], 1848, Berz. 
Arsb, 192 (Krisuvigit), f. Krisuvig, Iceland, its locality. A syn. of 
brochantite. 

ERCEBERITS. D. Foi'bes, 1865. Phil. Mag., 4th, xxix. 9, after 
Philip Kroeber, who discovered it. A strongly magnetic mineral, which 
" appears to be principally a sub sulphide of iron," not analyzed. 

EROHNKITE. /. Domeyko, 1876, Miu. Chili, 5th App., 33 (KrOnnk- 
ite), after B. KrShnke, who first analyzed it. Hydrous sulphate of 
sodium and copper, found in blue, crystalline masses. 

KROEAIilTIS. See crocalite. 

ERONETTE. Variant of krOhnkite. 

ERONNEITZI. See krOhnkite. 

KRUaiTB. H. Pi-ediU 1881, Deut. Ch. Ges.. \iv, b, 2188 (KrugitV 
in honor of Mining Director D. Krug von Nidda. Sulphide of potas- 
sium, calcium and magnesium, near poly halite. 

KRYPTOTIIiB. A. Sauer, 1886. Zt. Geol., xxxviii, 705 (Kryptotil). 
f. KfjvTtro^f * concealed,' and rz'/lo?, * fibre,' because it occurs in fine fibres. 
An alteration product of prismatiue, of light-green color. 

EUHNTTZI. H, J. Brooke and W, //. Miller, 1852, B. and M. Min.. 
481, after Dr. O. B. Eilhn, who first analyzed it. An obs. syn. of 
berzeliite. 

EULIBINITZI. See koulibinite. 

EUPAPHRITE. C. U. SJiepard, 1835. Shep. Min., i. 294, f. kupfer^ 
* copper,' and d<pfj6^, * foam,' A. O. Werner's earlier name, 1816, Hoff. 
Min., iii, (2), 180, being Kupferschaum. An obs. syn. of tyrolite. 

EUPFERPHTLLITE. A. BreithawpU 1830, Breit. Uib., 8 (Kupfer- 
phyllit), f. kupfer, 'copper ' and (puXXoVy *a leaf,' from its composition 
and structure. An obs. syn. of chalcopbyllite. 

EUFFFERITi:. B. Hermann, [1862, Soc. Nat. Mosc. Bull., xxxv, 
243], 1868, Kenng. Ueb. for 1862-65. 168 (Kupfferit), in honor of the crys- 
tallographer Prof. Adolph T. Kupffer. An emerald-green var. of an- 
thophyllite, colored by chromium. 

EUPHOITZ2. Variant of kupholite. 

EUPHOIilTZI. A, Breithaupt, 1832, Breit. Char., 315 (Kupholit), f. 
Kov<f>oS, ' light,' alluding to its very low specific gravity, and Ai'GoS. An 
obs. syn. of serpentine. 



EUPRSINZI 149 LAMPROPHANrrB 

EUPREINZI. A. BreiihaupU 1863, Berg. HQt., xxii, 35 (Kuprein), 
because it contains copper. An obs. syn. of cbalcodte. 

KUSTSIiITZI. A. Breithaujit, 1866, Berg. Hat., xxv, 169 (KUstelit), 
after Guido KQstel, its discoverer. A var. of silver, containing from ten 
to thirty per cent of gold. 

ETANTTIS. Variant of cyauite. 

EYLINDRITi:. A. Fremel, 1898, Jahrb. Min., ii, 125 (Kylindrit). f. 
KvXivdpo^, * a cylinder,' on account of the cylindrical form of its crystals. 
Sulph-antimonide of lead and tin. 

ETMATINE, A. BreitJiavpt. 1830, Breit. Uib., 29 (Kymatin), f. 
Kvfxa^ -aro^t * a wave,' on account of its wavy appearance. An obs. 
syn. of asbestos. 

EYPHOIiITZI. Variant of kupholite. 

EYROSrrZI. A. BreWiaupU 1843, Pogg. Ann., Iviii, 281 (Kyrosit), 
f. KvpoocTiiy * confirmation,' because it was thought to have been estab- 
lished as a separate species, among those previously called Weisskupfererz. 
A var. of marcasite, containing a small amount of arsenic. 

LAAVSNTTS. See l&vcnite. 

LABRADOR. Variant of labradorite. 

LABRADOR FDLDSPAR. An early name for labradorite. 

LABRADOR HORNBLENDE. A, O. Werner, 1789, Berg. Jour., 
i, 876 (Labradorische Hornblende), because a mineral similar to hornblende, 
from Labrador. An obs. name for hypersthene. 

LABRADORITE. A. O, Werner, 1780, Wem. Cronst., 149 (Labra- 
dorstein). because it is from Labrador. A member of the feldspar 
group which often shows chatoyant colors on its cleavage faces. 

LABRADOR STONE. See labradonte. 

LAGONITE. J. J, N. HuoU 1841, Huot Min.. i, 290, f. lagon, 
* lagoon.' An earthy, hydrous borate of iron, found as an incrustation 
at the Tuscan lagoons. Sometimes written lagunite. 

LAGUNITE. See lagonite. 

LAMPADITE. J. J, N. Huot, 1841, Huot Min., 1. 288, after Prof. 
W. A. Lampadius. who called it Kupfermangan, its earliest name [1817, 
Neue Erfahr. im Gebiete der Chemie u. Hattenk., ii, 70], 1817, Hoff. Min., 
iv, (2), 201. A var. of wad. containing oxide of copper. 

LAMPRITE. K. v. ReicJienbaeh, 1861, Pogg. Ann., cxiv, 477 
(Lamprit), f. XajnTtpo^, * shining.* A part of meteoric iron, earlier called 
Glanzeisen, from its lustre. 

LAMPROPHAN. See lamprophanite. 

LAMPROPHANTTE. L. J. Igelstrom, 1866, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., 
xxiii, 98 (Lamprofan), f. XapiTtpo^, 'shining,' and (paiyeaBai, * to appear. 



I.AMPROSTIBIAN 150 LARDITE 

alluding to its lustre. Sulphate of lead, calcium and other bases, found 
in thin foli:i, and having a pearly lustre. 

LAMPROSTIBIAN. L. J. Igelsirom, 1893, Geol. F6r. POrh., xv, 
471, f. XajLtirpoiy *shinipg,' and stibium, 'antimony/ alluding to its lustre 
and composition. Antimonate of iron and manganese, near melanos- 
tibian. 

LANAREITZ2. F. 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 366, f. Lanark- 
shire, Scotland, its locality. Sulpho-carbonate of lead, occurring in 
greenish-white, yellow or gray crystals. 

LANOASTBRTTB. B. Silliman, Jr„ 1850, A. J. 8., 2d. ix, 216, f. 
Lancaster Co., Pa., where it was found. A mixture of brucite and 
hydromagnesite. 

LANDSOAPE-MARBLE. A var. of limestone, or marble, having 
dendritic markings which resemble shrubbery and trees. 

LANGBANTTE. Q, Flink, 1877. Zt. Kryst., xiii, 1 (L&ngbanit), f. 
L&ngban, Sweden, its locality. Silicate of manganese with antimonate 
of iron, found in iron-black, hexagonal crystals. 

LANGITE. N. 8. Maskelyne, 1864, C. R., lix, 633, in honor of Dr. 
Victor von Lr%ng. Hydrous oxy-sulphate of copper, near brochantite. 

IiANGSTAFFITE. F, Alger, 1844, Alger Phil., 144, after Dr. 
W. Langstaff, who had examined it. An obs. syn. of chondrodite. 

LANSFORDITE. F. A. Genth, 1888, Zt. Kryst., xiv. 255 (Lans- 
fordit), f. Lansford, Pa., near which place it was found. Hydrous 
carbonate of magnesium, which when first found resembles parafiSn. 

LANTHANTTE. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 500 (Lan- 
thanit), f. its composition. Hydrous carbonate of lanthanum, found in 
thin, tabular crystals with a pearly lustre. 

LANTHANOOERTTE. R Hermann, 1861, Jour. Pk. Ch., Ixxxii. 
406 (Lanthanocerit), f. its composition. A var. of cerite, containing 
much lanthanum. 

liAPIS-IiAZULI. See lazurite. 

LAPIS OLLARIS. J. G. Wallerius, 1747. Wall. Min., 185, the so- 
called • potstone,' because pots were made from it. An early name for 
soapstone. 

LARDERELLITE. E. Bechi, 1854, A. J. S., 2d, xvii, 129, in honor 
of Count F. de Lardarel, proprietor of many of the boracic acid fumeroles 
of Tuscany. Hydrous borate of ammonium, found as a white, crystal- 
line powder. 

IiARDERITE. Error for lardite. 

LARDITE. J. G, Wallerius, 1778, Wall. Min., i, 399 (Lardites), f. 
the earlier name ' pierre de lard,' V. de Bomare, 1762, Bomare Min., i, 128, 



LASIONITE 151 lAvENTTB 

which alludes to its greasy feeling. An obs. syn. of steatite, later used 
as a syn. of pagodite. 

IiASIONirS. J. N. FucliB, 1816. Jour. Ch. Ph. , xviii, 288 (Lasionit). 
f. XdcFio^t • hairy,' alluding to its fibrous structure and capillary crystals. 
A syn. of wavellite. 

LASURITS. TF. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb.. 508 (Lasur), f. its 
Lasurfarbe, 'azure color.' An obs. syn. of azurite. 

LATIAIflTi:. G. O. Gismondi, [1803, read before Accad. de Liucei, 
liome, not published], 1868, DanaMiu., 333, f. Latium, because found on 
the Campagna, and XiBo^. An obs. syn. of hatiynite. 

LATIONITE. Error for lasiouite. 

LATROBITS. H. J. Brooke, 1823, Ann. Phil. , v, 383, after the Rev. 
C. I. Latrobe, its discoverer. A pale red feldspar from Labrador, very 
near amphodelite. 

IiAUBANITE. R. Traube, 1887, Jahrb. Min.. ii, 64 (Laubanit), f. 
Lauban, Silesia, its locality. Hydrous silicate of aluminum and calcium, 
of milk-white color, found in fibrous bundles resembling stilbite. 

LAUMONITE. Variant of laumoutite. 

IiAUMONTITE. A. G, Werner, 1805, Jam. Min., ii, 539 (Lomonite), 
after F. P. N. Gillet de Laumont, its discoverer. Changed to laumontite 
by J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 399. Hydrous silicate of aluminum 
and calcium, found in white to red crystals, which lose water and become 
opaque on exposure to the air. 

IiAURIONITE. R. Koclilin. [1887, Ann. Mus. Wien, ii, 185], 1889, 
Zt. Kryst., xvii, 112 (Laurionit), f. Laurion, *Laurium,' Greece, its locality. 
Oxy-chloride of lead, found in white, prismatic crystals, as the result of 
the action of sea water on lead slag. 

LAURITE. Ft. WoJiler, 1866, G5tt. Ges. Nachr., 155 (Laurit), in 
honor of Mrs. Laura Joy, wife of Prof. C. A. Joy. Sulphide of ruthe- 
nium, found in minute, octahedral crystals in platinum sand. 

LAUTARITE. A. Dieize, 1891, Zt. Kryst., xix. 447 (Lautarit), f. the 
Oficina Lautaro, Chili, its locality. A calcium iodate, found in yellowish, 
prismatic crystals. 

LAUTITB. A. Frenzel, 1881, Min. Mitth.. iii, 515 (Lautit), f. Lauta, 
Saxony, its locality. A mechanical mixture of arsenic with a mineral 
near euargite. 

LAVSNDULAN. A, Breithaupi, 1837, Jour. Pk. Ch., x, 505, f. 
lavendula, 'lavender,' alluding to its color. An amorphous arsenate of 
copper colored with cobalt, of lavender-blue color. 

LAVENDULITZI. Variant of lavendulan. 

LAVZINTTZI. W, a Brogger, 1885, Geol. FOr. F6rh., vli, 598 



IiAVROFFITZI 152 LEAD-VITRIOL 

(L&venit), f. L&ven Isl., Norway, its locality. Silicate of zirconium, 
sodium, etc., found in brown or yellow, monoclinic crystals. 

LAVROFFITZ2. N, J. v. Kokscharov, 1867, Acad. St. Pet. Bull., 
xi, 78 (Lawrowit), in honor of N. von Lavrov. An aluminous pyroxene, 
colored green by vanadium. 

LAWRENCrrZI. A, Davbree, 1877, C. R., Ixxxiv, 69, after Prof. 
J. Lawrence Smith, who discovered it. Ferrous chloride, found in 
meteoric iron. 

LAWROWITE. See lavrofflte. 

LAWSONrrE. F. L'Hansome, [1895, Bull. Dept. Geol. XJniv. Cal., 
i, (10)], 1895. A. J. S. 3d. 1, 75. in honor of Prof. A. C. Lawson. A 
hydrous silicate of aluminum and calcium, found in colorless to pale 
blue crystals. 

LAXMANNTTZI. A. E. Nordenskiold, 1867, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., 
xxiv, 655 (Laxmannit). after Prof. E. Laxmann, who first called attention 
to the minerals from its locality. A syn. of vauqueliuite. 

LAZIALITZ2. Error for latialite. 

LAZULTTZI. M. H, Klaproth, 1795, Klap. Beit., i, 202 (Lazulit), f. 
its older name, Lazurstein. Hydrous phosphate of aluminum and mag- 
nesium, found in azure-blue, monoclinic crystals. 

Also used early as a syn. of liipis lazuli. 

LAZURAPATITB. J!i, Nordenskiold, 1857, Soc. Nat. Mosc. Bull., 
XXX, 224 (Lazur-Apatite). A sky-blue var. of apatite, found in Siberia. 

LAZURFSLDSPAR. N. NordensUbld, 1857, Soc. Nat. Mosc. 
Bull., XXX, 225 (Lazur-Feldspath). A blue var. of orthoclase, found in 
Siberia. 

LAZURirS. F, V. Kohelh 1853, Kob. Taf., 32 (Lazurit), f. its color. 
An obs. syn. of azurite. 

Also used by W. C. Brogger and H. Bdckstromy 1890, Zt. Kryst., xviii, 
231 (Lasurit), as a syn. of lapis lazuli. E. 8. Dana adopts this, 1892, Dana 
Miu., 432 (Lazurite), as the name of lapis lazuli. 

Lapis lazuli was first used by B. de Boot, 1647, B. de Boot Hist., 278, 
who says it is from azul, whence the name azuri or lazuli is deduced. 

LEAD. The metal as a mineral, usually called native lead. 

LISAD-GLANOIS. An early name for galeuite, alluding to its lustre. 

LXSAD-OOHRE. The yellow oxide of lead as a mineral. 

LEAD-ORE. A common name for galenite. 

LEAD-SPAR. An early name for cerussite. 

LEAD-VITRIOL. A. O. Monnet, 1779, Monn. Min., 372 (Vitriol de 
Saturne), because it is a sulphate of lead, Saturn being the alchemistic 
name of lead. An obs. syn. of auglesite. 



l.£2ADHILIiIT£2 158 LZiraOOEROITZI 

IiSADHILIiITE. F, 8. BeudanU 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 366. f. Lead- 
hills, Scotland, its locality. Sulphato-carbonate of lead, found in whitish 
crystals with a pearly or adamantine lustre. 

IiSATHERSTONS. Q, Edwards, 1776, Edw. Foss., 63, f. its re- 
semblance to leather. An obs. syn. of mountain-leather. 

LEBERKISZ]. F. S. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 404. f. Leber- 
kies, * liver pyrites.' An obs. syn. of pyrrhotite. 

LBOONTITB W. J. Taylor, 1858, A. J. S., 2d, xxvi, 273, after 
Dr. John L. Le Conte, its discoverer. Hydrous sulphate of sodium and 
■ammonium, found in colorless, pnsmatic crystals. 

liZSDERERITZI. C. T. Jackson, 1829, A. J. 8., xvi, 207 (Lederite), 
in honor of Baron Louis von Lederer, in recognition of his interest in the 
science of mineralogy. Later called ledererite, 1834, A. J. S., xxv, 78. 
An obs. syn. of gmelinite. 

LEDERITE. G. V. Shepard, 1840, A. J. S., xxxix, 360, in honor of 
Baron Louis von Lederer. A var. of titanite, of brown color and brilliant 
lustre. 

See also ledererite. 

LEEDSITE. J. D. Dana, 1850, Dana Min., 704, f. Leeds, Eng., its 
locality. A mixture of barium and calcium sulphates. 

LEELITE. E, B. Clarke, 1818, Ann. Phil., xi, 367, after Dr. J. F. 
Lee, from whom it was received. A compact var. of orthoclase, of waxy 
lustre. 

LBHMANITB. J. C. Belametherie, 1797, Delam. T. T., ii, 354, after 
Lake Lehman (Leman), its locality. Later spelled lemanite. An obs. 
syn. of saussurite. 

IiBHMANNITB. H. J. Brooke and W. H. Miller, 1852, B. and M. 
Min., 557, after Prof. J. G. Lehmaun, of St. Petersburg, its discoverer. 
An obs. syn. of crocoite. 

LEHRBACHITB. H. J. Brooke and W. H, Miller, 1852, B. and M. 
Min., 153, f. Lehrbach, Harz Mts., its locality. Seleuide of lead and 
mercury, found in gray to black masses. 

LBHUNTITB. T. Thomson, [1831 Bryce Tab.], 1833, Phil. Mag., 
8d, iii, 85, in honor of Capt. Lehuut. An obs. syn. of natrolite. 

IiBIDTITB. O. A. Koenig, 1878, Acad. Nat. Sci. Proc, 84, in honor 
of Dr. Joseph Leidy. Hydrous silicate of aluminum, iron, magnesium 
and calcium, found in fine, green scales with silky lustre. 

liEIMONITB. Variant of limonite. 

liEraOCHROITB. E, J, C/iapman, 1848, Chap. Min., 35, f. \etp6?, 
•pale,* and xpotd, 'color.* alluding to its pale, bluish-green color. An 
•obs. syn. of tyrolite. 



. LEMANITZ2 154 LEPIDOPELSITEr 

LSMANITE. See lelimanite. 

LENARTITS. 8. Meunier, 1893, Meun. Fere Met., 62, f. Lenarto, 
Hungary, where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 

LENNILITS. /. Lea, 1866. Acad. Nat. Sci. Proc., 110, f. Lenni, 
Pa., its locality, and XiOoS. A greenish var. of ortboclase. 

Also used in the erroneous form leruilite, by A, Schrauf, 1882, Zt. 
Kryst., vi, 350 (Lernilith), for a vermiculite from the same locality. 

LE3NTIIi-OR£! . An early name for liroconite, because its crystals 
are lentil-shaped. 

LBNTUIilTB. H. W, Brisiow, 1861, Brist. Gloss., 213, f. lens, 
lentis, *a lentil,' f. its earlier name lentil-ore, and Xtdoi, A name sug- 
gested for liroconite. 

LENZIN. See lenzinite. 

LENZINITZ2. J, F. John, 1816, Tasch. Min., x. (2), 837 (Lenzin), ia 
honor of Dr. Jobann G. Lenz. A var. of balloysite, having somewhat 
the appearance of opal. 

LEONHARDITS. J. R. Blum, 1843, Pogg. Ann. , lix, 336 (Leon- 
hardit), in honor of Prof. Carl C. von Leonbard. A var. of laumontite, 
containing less than the normal amount of water. 

LEOPOLDITZI. E, Beichardi, 1866, Jabrb. Min., 331 (Leopoldit), f. 
Leopoldshall, Prussia, its locality. A syn. of sylvite. 

liZSPIDOCHLORE. C. U, Shepard, 1859, Kept. Mt. Pisgah, 6, f. 
Xenii, tdoi, 'scale,' and ;fA<»/joS, ' green.' alluding to its scaly appearance 
and color. An impure chlorite, containing mica. 

LBPIDOOROOITE. J. C. Ullmann, 1813, Haus. Min., i, 269 
(I^epidocrocit), f. Xenii, -i8o^, * scale,' and KftoKii, * fibre,' alluding to its 
appearance. An obs. syn. of gStbite. 

LEPIDOUTE. Af. H. Klajn-oth, 1792, Berg. Jour., ii, 80 (Lepido- 
lith), f. AeTTi?. -i5o?. • scale,' alluding to its appearance, and XiBo%. A 
rose-red, lilac or gray mica, containing lithia. 

LEPIDOMELANE. J. F. L. Hausmann, 1840, GOtt. Ges. Anz., 
915 (Lepidomelau), f. Xejrii, -ido^, 'scale.' and jneXdSf 'black,' alluding^ 
to its appearance. A highly ferruginous mica, usually found in aggre- 
gations of small, black scales. 

LBPIDOMORPHITB. F, v, Sandberger, [1SS6, .8a,nd, Unt. Erz., 
344]. 1887, Zt. Kryst., xiii, 414 (Lepidomorphit), f. XeTti?, -tdo?, 'scale,'^ 
and uo(j(prf, 'form,' alluding to its appearance. A fine, scaly mica, the 
result of the alteration of oligoclase. 

IiEPIDOPHAUTE. A, Weisbach, 1880, Jahrb. Min., ii, 109 (Lepi- 
dopbait), f. AeW?, -i<5o?, 'scale,' and <f>ai6^, ' dun, ' alluding to its appear- 
ance. A fibrous and scaly var. of lampadite. 



LZIPOXilTE 155 LiESVC&PETRIN 

LBPOIilTB. A. A. Josaa, 1847, Breit. Handb., iii, 530 (Lepolit), f. 
Xeito'i, ' a husk/ because the crystals are covered with a brownish crust, 
and XiBoi, A var. of anorthite from Finland. 

LBPTONBMATITB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 75, perhaps 

f. XcTCTo'iy *thin, fine,* and vejuT^rd?, *to be distributed,* because a some- 
what rare mineral. A syn. of braunite. 

IiBRNIIJTB. See lennilite. 

LBSLBYITB. /. Lea, 1867, Acad. Nat. Sci. Proc, 44, after John 
Lesley, on whose farm it was found. An alteration product of corun- 
dum, similar to ephesite. 

LETTSOMITB. J, Percy, 1850, Phil. Mag., xxxvi, 100, in honor of 
Dr. W. G. Lettsom. A hydrous sulphate of copper and aluminum, 
called also cyanothrichite. 

LBUOANTBRITE. C. U. Shepard, 1859, Kept. Mt. Pisgah, 8, 
probably f, XevKavT-rj^, *one that makes white.' alluding to its appear- 
ance. A white efflorescence on copperasine, never fully described. 

LBUCAUGITE. /. B. Dana, 1868, Dana Miu., 216, f. Aeu/co?, 
* white,* and augite. A white or grayish var. of augite. 

LBUOHTI3NBERaiTB. A. Komonen, [1842, Min. Ges. St. Pet. 
Verb., 64], 1843, Pogg. Ann., lix, 492(Leucbtenbergil), in honor of Maxi- 
milian, Duke of Leuchtenberg. A var. of clinochlore, often resembling 
talc. 

IiBUOITB. A, Q. Werner, 1791, Berg. Jour., ii, 489 (Leucit), f. 
XevKoi, 'white,* alluding to its color. Silicate of aluminum and potas« 
slum, usually found in glassy trapezohedrons. 

LEUCOOEALCITB. F. v, Sandberger, 1881, Jahrb. Min., i, 263 
(Leucochalcit), f. XevKoS, 'white,* and x^^*^o^* 'copper.* An arsenate 
of copper, usually found in white, silky, needle-like crystals. 

LEUOOOYOIiTTB. D. Bremter, 1889, Glock Min., 517, said to be 
f. XevKo?, 'white,* and kvkXo^, *a circle,' alluding to its appearance 
under polarized light. A syn. of apophyllite. 

LEUOOIiITE. J, C. Delameiherie, 1792, Delam. Sciag., ii. 401, f. 
XevKoi, * white,* referring to its color, and AziSo?. An obs. syn. of dipyre. 

Delametherie also included under this name, 1795, Delam. T. T,, i, 
401, the pycnite from Altenberg, Saxony. 

Leucolite is used by A. Dufrenoy, 1847, Duf. Min., iii, 898, as a syn. 
of leucite. 

LEnCOMANGANITE. F. v. Sandberger, 1879, Jahrb. Min., 370 
(Leucomanganit), f. XevKo?, 'white,* and manganese, from its color and 
composition. A syn. of fairfieldite. 

LEUOOPBTRIN. See leucopetrite. 



IiBUCOPETRITZI 156 IiI£2BiaiTS 

. LBUOOPBTRITB. L. Bruckner, 1852, Jour. Pk. Ch., Ivii, 8 
Leucopetrln), f. XevKoi, 'white,' and nerpo^, 'stone,* because its locality 
is Weissenfels. A hydrocarbon between resin and wax in character, 
derived from brown coal. 

IiSUCOPHANS. See leucophanite. 

LBUOOPHANITB. J. Eamark, 1840, Vet. Ak. Stock., 191 (Leu- 
kophnn), f. XevKo'S, 'white,' and <pcxiy€(rBat, 'to appear,' because it 
sometimes presents whitish reflections. A fluosilicate of glucinum, 
sodium and calcium. 

LEUCOPHYLIiTTB. O, 8ta/rkl, [1883, Geol. Reich. Jahrb., xxxiii, 
653], 1885, Zt. Kryst., x, 428 (Leucophyllit), f. XevKoS, 'white,' and 
(pvXXov, 'a leaf,' in allusion to its appearance. A var. of damourite 
resembling sericite. 

LBUOOPTRTTE. C. U. Shepard, 1835, Shep. Min. (2), 8, f. XevKoS, 
'white,' and pyrite, because a white kind of pyrites. A var. of I511ing- 
ite. 

LBUOOTILB. B, B, Hare, [1879, Inaug. Diss. Breslau], 1879. Zt. 
Xryst., iv, 294 (Leukotil), f. XevKo?^ 'white,' and rr'Ao?, 'fibre,' from its 
;appearance. A hydrous silicate of magnesium and other bases, found 
in fibrous masses with a silvery, silky lustre. 

IiBUEARaTRITE. A. Weishach, 1875, Weis. Syn., 62 (Leuk- 
urgyrit), f. XevKo^, 'white,' and ccpyvpoi, 'silver.' A syn. of argen- 
tiferous tetrahedrite. 

LFVBRRIBRITB. P. Termier, 1889, C. R., cviii, 1071, in honor of 
the Engineer-in-chief of mines, U. Le Verrier. A hydrated silicate of 
aluminum, near kaoHuite. 

LBVIGLIANITB. A. d'Aehiardi, 1876, Soc. Tosc. Atti, ii. 112, f. 
Levigliani, Italy, its locality, A sulpho-selenide of mercury containing 
iron, not fully examined. 

LBVYNB. See levynite. 

LBVYNITB. D. Brewster, 1826, Ed. Jour. Sci., ii, 332 (Levyne), in 
honor of Prof. Armand Levy. Hydrous silicate of aluminum and cal- 
cium, found in tabular crystals, either colorless or slightly tinged with 
green, red or yellow. 

UBBTHBNITE. A. Breithaupt, 1823, Breit. Char., 267 (Libethenit). 
f. Libetben, Hungary, its locality. Phosphate of copper of an olive- 
green color, found in crystals and reniform masses. 

LIBBBNBRITB. J, C, Marignac, [1847, Bibl. Univ., vi, 293], 1849, 
Jahrb.- Min., 201, in honor of L. Liebener. A pinite-like mineral result- 
ing from the alteration of neph elite. 

IJBBiaiTB. J. L, Smith, 1848, A. J. S., 2d, v, 336, in honor of 



UBBNZIRITE 157 UMNITS 

Baron Justus von Liebig. Hydrous carbonate of uranium and calcium, 
found in thin, yellow incrustations. 

LIEBNERITE. Error for liebenerite. 

LIEVRTTE. A. G. Werner, 1812, Hoff. Min., ii, (1). 376 (Lievrit), 
after C. H Leli^vre, who first described it under the name yeuite. A 
syn. of ilvaite. 

LiaNrrS. a, Brongniart, 1807, Brong. Min., ii, 30, f. lignum, 
'wood.' Avar, of coal which still retains somewhat the structure of 
the original wood. 

LIGURITi:. D, Viriani 1813, Jour, de Phys., Ixxvii, 236, f. Ligu- 
ria, the ancient name for t he part of Italy in which it was found. An 
apple-green var. of titanite. 

LILAIiITE. /. V. Born, 1791, Chem. Ann., ii, 196 (Lilalith), f. lilas, 
'lilac,' alluding to its color, and AzfioS. An obs. syn. of lepidolite. 

LTIiTATHlTE. Error for lilalite. 

ULLHAMMERITE. A. Weishach, 1875, Weis. Syn., 57 (Lillham- 
merit), f. Lillehammer, Norway, its locality. A syn. of pentlandite. 

LUiLIANTTE. H. F. Keller, 1889, Zt. Kryst., xvii, 72 (Lillianit), f. 
the Lillian mine, Leadville, Colo., its locality. Sulphide of bismuth and 
lead, near kobellite. 

LILUTE. A. E, Eeu88, 1857, K. Ak. Wien, xxv, 550 (Lillit), in 

honor of von Lill, of Przibram. A hydrous silicate of iron, similar 

in appearance to glauconite. 

LIMBAOHTTE. A. Fremel, 1873. Jahrb. Min., 789 (Limbachit), f. 
Limbach, Saxony, its locality. A hydrous silicate of aluminum and 
magnesium, resembling cerolite. 

LIMBIIiITZI. H, B, de Saussure, 1794, Jour, de Phys.. xlv, 341. 
f. Limbourg, Swabia, its locality, and XiOoi, An obs. syn. of chryso- 
lite. 

UMBITE. Variant of limbilite. 

LIMZ2-ISPIDOTE. A syn . of zoisite. 

UMIS-FELDSPAR. A syn. of auorthite. 

LIME-HARMOTOMB. A. Breithavpi, 1827, Jour. Ch. Ph., 1, 827 
(Kalk-Harmotom). An obs. syn. of phillipsite. 

IiIM£S-MALACHIT£S. See calco-malachite. 

IiIM£S-M£SSOTYP£j. An obs. syn. of scolecite. 

IiIM£j-nRANIT£j. From Kalk-Urauit, an early name for autunite. 

IiIM£S-WAV£SLLIT£S. B. Kosmann, 1869, Zt. Geol., xxi, 799 
(Kalkwavellit). A var. of wavellite, supposed to contain lime as an 
essential ingredient. 

IiIMNITZI. E. F. Olocker, 1847, Glock Syn., 62 (Limnir), f. Xijuvrf, 



UMONITE 158 UROOONTTB 

*a bog/ in allusion to its source. A syn. of bog iron ore. J, D. Dana, 
1868, Dana Miu., 178, confines the name to the recently formed varieties of 
limonite (bog ore) containing much water. 

lilMONITZI. J. F. L. Hausmann, 1818, Haus. Min., i, 283 (Limonit), 
probably f. Xeiuoov, 'meadow,' because earlier called Wiesenerz, 'meadow 
ore.' The name was at first confined to bog iron ore. F, 8, Beudant, 
1832, Beud. Min., ii, 702, extends it to its present use. Hydrated ses- 
quioxide of iron, containing three molecules, or about fifteen per cent, of 
water. 

UNARITZ2. E. F. Gloeker, 1839, Glock. Min., 618, f. Linares, 
Spain, a supposed locality. Basic sulphate of lead and copper, occurring 
in brilliant blue crystals. 

UNOOLNINS. Variant of lincolnite. 

UNOOLNrrS. E, mtcheock, 1833, Geol. Mass., 437. in honor of 
Gov. Levi Lincoln, of Mass. An obs. syn. of heulaudite. 

UNDACEERITZI. W. Haidinger, 1853, Geol. Reich. Jahrb., iv, 
552 (Lindackcrit), after J. Liudacker, its first analyst. Hydrous sulph- 
arsenate of copper and nickel, occurring iu oblong, tabular, green crystals. 

IJNDESITE. L, J, Igelstrtm, 1894. Zt. Kryst., xxiii, 590 (Lindesit), 
f . the Parish of Liude, Sweden, where it was found. A schefferite-like 
mineral, probably identical with urbanite. 

IiINDSATITE. N. Nordemkiold, 1843, Min. Ges. St. Pet. Verb., 
112 (Lindsayit). , (No derivation given). An altered var. of lepolite. 

UNDSEITE. Variant of lindsayite. 

UNNJEITB. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 560 (Linneit), 
after Prof. Carl von Linne (Linnseus), who had described it earlier. 
Sulphide of cobalt with varying proportions of nickel, found in brilliant 
steel-gray crystals. 

UNSSITE. Variant of lindsayite. 

UNTONITE. 8. F. Peckham and C. W. Hall, 1880, A. J. S., 8d, 
xix, 122, after Miss Laura A. Linton, who analyzed it. A var. of thorn- 
sonite, found in green amygdules in trap. 

UONITE. Th. Berdell, 1877, Am. Phil. Soc. Proc, 172, f. the 
Mountain Lion mine, Boulder Co., Colo., its locality. A var. of native 
tellurium, containing much silica. 

LIPARITE. E. F. Oloeker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 282 (Liparit), f. 
Xindpoi, 'oily, shining, beautiful,' alluding to its appearance. An obs. 
syn. of fluorite. 

UROOONZI-MAIiAOHITE. See liroconite. 

UROOONTTE. W. Haidinger, 1825, Haid. Mohs., iii, 305 (Index), 
f. F, M6M earlier name, Lirocone-Malachite, 1820, Mohs Char., 46, f. 



USESARDITZ2 159 LODESTONB 

Aeipoi, *pale,' and Kovia, * powder,* alluding to the color of its streak- 
powder. Hydrous arsenate of aluminum and copper, occurring in 
bluish-green crystals. 

lilSSSARDITZI. JVr. 8. Maskelyne, 1878, Nature, xviii, 426, f. 
Liskeard, Cornwall, its locality. Hydrous arsenate of aluminum and 
iron, found in bluish or greenish- white crusts. 

LITHIA MICA. J. J. Berzelius, 1831, Bera. Loth., 273 (Lithion- 
glimmer). A syn. of lepidolite. 

LITHIDIONrrS. E. Scacchh 1880. Kap. Ac. Rend., xix. 178 
(Litidionite), f. XiBidiov, *a pebble,' in allusion to its form. A name 
given to certain blue lapilli from Vesuvius. 

IJTHIOLm:. Variant of lithiophilite. 

UTHIONITS. F. V, Kobell, 1853, Kob. Min. Nam., 83 (Lithionit). 
f. its composition. An obs. syn. of lepidolite. 

UTHIOPHUilTE. G. J. Brush and K 8. Dana, 1878, A. J. 8., 3d, 
xvi, 118, f. lithium and <f>iX6s, ' a friend,' because it contains much lithium. 
A var. of triphylite, containing much manganese and little iron. 

UTHIOPHORITS. A. BreithaupU 1870. Jour. Pk. Ch., 2d. ii, 203 
(Lithiophorit), f. lithium and (pipeiv, ' to bear,' alluding to its composition. 
A manganese ore near psilomelane, containihg some lithium. 

LITHOMARGE. An early name for several kinds of soft clay-like 
minerals, including kaolin. 

UTHOXTL. J, Q. Wallerius, 1747, Wall. Min., 884 (Lithoxylon), 
f. XiBos, and ^vXov, * wood.' A syn. of wood-opal. 

IiTTHOXTLON. See lithoxyl. 

IJTIDIONmS. See lithidionite. 

LIVER-OPAL. D. L, O. Karsien, 1800, Karat. Tab., 24 (Leber- 
opal), alluding to its color. An obs. syn. of menilite. 

LIVER-ORE. An early name for hepatic cinnabar. 

LIVER-PYRITES. See hepatopyrite. 

LIVERBTONE. A syn. of hepatite. 

LIVINGBTONITE. M. Barcena, [1874, Naturaleza, ill. 35], 1874, 
A. J. S., 3d, viii, 145, in honor of Dr. David Livingstone. Sulph- 
antimonide of mercury, resembling stibnite, but affording a red streak. 

LOADSTONE. Variant of lodestone. 

LOBOITE. J. J. Bereelius, 1815, Afh. i Fis., iv, 147 (Loboit), after 
Lobo da Silveira, who first described it. An obs. syn. of vesuvianite. 

LOOEPORTITE. 8. Meunier, 1893. Meun. Fers Met., 47, f. Lock- 
port, N. Y., where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 

LODALTTE. Error for lotalite, 

LODESTONE. From lode, 'way,' alluding to the common use of 



LODULITZ2 160 LOWIGITB 

the magnetic needle. The var. of magnetite which possesses polarity; 
a naturul magnet. 

IiODUIiTTZI. Error for lotalite. 

LCBLUNarrZI. See lOllingite. 

LGESWrrZI. See I5weite. 

LCBWiarrZI. See iDwigitc. 

LOGANITE. T. 8, Hunt, 1851, Phil. Mag., 4th, ii, 66, in honor of 
Sir Wm. Logan, of the Canadian Geol. Survey. An altered hornblende, 
near penuiuite in composition. 

LOLINaiTE. See 1511iugite. 

LOLLINaiTE. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 559 (LOlingit), 
f. L511ing-IlUtteubcrg. Carinthia. its locality. Orthorhombic arsenide 
of iron, including several varieties. 

LOMONITE. See laumonite. Werner spelled it lomonit to indicate 
its proper pronunciation. 

LONOHIDITB. A. BreWiaupt, 1849, Pogg. Ann.. Ixxvii, 185 
(Lonchidit), f. X(yxi^^^^* *a small spear-head,' alluding to the shape of 
its cr3'stals. A var. of marcasite containing arsenic. 

LONGBANITE. See Idngbanite. 

IiOFEOITZI. A. Breithaupt, 1841, Breit. Handb., ii, 381 (Lophoit), 
f. X6<p()S, ' cockscomb,' alluding to the shape of its crystalline aggregates. 
An obs. syu. of prochlorite. 

LOSSENITZ]. L. Milch, 1894, Zt. Kryst.. xxiv, 103 (Lossenit), in 
honor of Prof. C. A. Lessen. Arsenate of iron and lead, found in small, 
red-brown crystals. 

LOTALALTTZI. See lotalite. 

LOTALITZ2. Basil Severgin, 1803, Nova Acta Pet., xv, 486 (Loiala- 
lite, abridged to Lotalite), f. Lotala, Finland, its locality, and XiBoS. A 
pyroxene near hedenbergite. 

LOUISITE. 2>. Honeymann, 1878, N. S. Inst., v, 15, after H. Louis, 
who analyzed it. A hydrous silicate of calcium, found as a transparent, 
glassy, leek-green mineml. 

IiOVZIITZI. See lOweite. 

LOVSNTTZI. See l&venite. 

LOWZ2ITE. W, Haidinger, [1846, BOh. Ges. Abb., iv], 1847, Haid. 
Ber., ii, 266 (L5weit), in honor of A. L5we, Chief Assayer of the Mint 
at Vienna. Hydrous sulphate of magnesium and sodium, found in 
yellowish, crystalline masses. 

IibWIGITE. A, MiUcherlich, 1861. Jour. Pk. Ch. Ixxxiii, 474 
(Ldwigit), after K. J. LOwig, who first analyzed it. Hydrous sulphate 
of aluminum and potassium, found in yellowish nodules. 



LOXOOIiASE 161 LUSOITE 

LOXOOLASE. A. Breithaupi, 1846, Pogg. Ann., Ixvli, 419, f. 
Xo^oi, 'oblique,* and kXocv, Mo cleave,* alluding to its orthodiagonal 
cleavage. A var. of ortboclase, containing considerable sodium. 

LUOASITZI. T, M. Chatard, 1886, A. J. S.. 3d, xxxii, 375, in bonor 
of Dr. H. 8. Lucas, on account of bis connection with corundum mines. 
A yellowish-brown, micaceous mineral, near jefferisite, from Corundum 
Hill, N. C. 

LUOKITB. A. Carnot, 1879, Bull. Soc. Min.. ii, 168, f. the Lucky 
Boy mine, Utah, its locality. A syn. of melanterite. 

LUCULLAN. See lucullite. 

LUCULLirS. J. F, John, [1810, John Unt., ii, 227], 1814, Ullm. 
Tab., 448 (Lucullan), f. Luculleum marmor, *the marble of Lucullus,* 
Pliny, 77, Pliny Hist., Bk. 86, 49. A syn. of antbracoxenite. 

LUDL AMITE. N, 8, Maskelyne and F. Field, 1877, Phil. Mag., 
5th, iii, 52, in honor of Ludlam, a personal friend. Hydrous phos- 
phate of iron, occurring in brilliant, transparent, green crystals. 

LUDWIGITE. O. Tschermak, 1874, Min. Mitth., 59 (Ludwigit), 
after Prof. E. Ludwig, who analyzed it. Borate of iron and magnesium, 
found in fibrous, black masses. 

LUMAOHISLLZS. An early popular name, f. lumachella, ' a little 
shell,* for a dark colored marble containing shells, which give brilliant, 
fire-like reflections. 

LUNZIBURarrZI. a mUmr, 1870, K. Ak. MUnch., i, 291 
(Ltlneburgit), f. LQneburg, Hanover, its locality. Hydrous boro-phos- 
phate of magnesium. 

LUNNrrS. J. J, Bernhardt, 1839, Glock. Min., 578 (Lunnit), after 
the Rev. F. Lunn, who had analyzed it. An obs. syn. of pseudomala- 
chite. 

LUO-OALOITB. 0, U, 87iepard, 1857, Shep. Min. Supp., p. iv, f. 
Xveiv, 'to dissolve,* and calcite. Bicarbonate of calcium, found in 
solution in spring-water. 

LUO-CEALTBITZ2. C, U. Sliepard, 1857, Shep. Min. Supp., p. iv, 
f. XveiVy *to dissolve,* and chalybite. Bicarbonate of iron, found in 
solution in spring- water. 

LUO-DIALLOaiT£2. C, U. Shepard, 1857, Shep. Min. Supp., p. iv, 
f. Xveiv, ' to dissolve,' and diallogite. Bicarbonate of manganese, found 
in solution in spring- water. 

LUO-MAGNSSITZI. C, U. Shepard, 1857, Shep. Min. Supp., p. iv. 
f. Xveiv, • to dissolve,' and magnesite. Bicarbonate of magnesium, 
found in solution in spring- water. 

LUSCITZ2. Error for fuscite. 



IiUSSATTTZI 163 BflAOLUREITEI 

IiUSSATTTE. E. Mallard, 1890, Bull. Soc. Min., xiii. 68, f. Lussat, 
France, its locality. Silica, similar to chalcedony in structure, but having 
the specific gravity of opal. 

IiUTECITZI. A. Micliel-Lety and Munier-Chalmas, 1892, Bull. Soc. 
Min., 174. No derivation gi?en. A fibrous form of silica, found with 
chalcedony and quartzine in certain spherulites. 

IiUZONTTZI. A, Weisbaeh and C. Winckler, 1874, Min. Mitth.. 257 
(Luzouit), f. the island of Luzon, where it was found. A sulph-arsenide 
of copper, similar to enargite. 

LTDIAN STONE. Prom Lapis Lydius, Pliny, 77, Pliny Hist. Bk. 
88, 43, so called from its locality. A syn. of basanite, touchstone. 

IiTDITZI. F. A. Beuss, 1801, Reuss Min., (2), i, 339 (Lydit). An 
obs. syn. of Lydian stone. 

LTZZLIilTIS. N, 8. Maskelyne, 1864, Chem. News, x, 268. in honor 
of Sir Charles Lyell. A syn. of devilline. 

IiTNOURmS. T. 8. Hunt, 1886, Hunt Phys., 867, f. XtyKovptor, 
See lyncurium. Zircon of sp. gr. 4.02. the lowest that has been noticed. 

LTNOURIUM. Prom AiJ^I, 'lynx,' and ovpov, 'urine,* because 
anciently supposed to be the solidified urine of the lynx. A stone used for 
intaglios, not now identified with certainty, but supposed to be the modem 
hyacinth. 

Pliny used the name AvyKovpiov, 77, Pliny Hist., Bk. 37, 18, for 
amber. 

LTNX-STONE. An early syn. for Pliny's lyncurium. 

LYTHRODES. D. L. Q. Karaten, 1810, Ges. Nat. Berl. Mag., iv, 
78, f. XvSpooSrjiy 'soiled with gore,' because covered with red spots which 
gave it the appearance of being sprinkled with blood. An altered 
nephelite, similar to pinite. 

MAOFARIiANITE. A. H. 8ihley, 1880, Am. Inst. M. E., viii, 236, 
after T. Macfarlane, who described it. A mixture of huntilite, animi- 
kite and other minerals, which constitutes the ore of the mines at Silver 
Islet, Ontario. 

MACEINTOBHITE. W, E. Hidden, 1893, A. J. S., 3d, xlvi, 98, 
after J. B. Mackintosh, who had made a special study of thorium. 
Hydrous silicate of thorium and uranium, found enclosed in thorogummite. 

MACLE. R, J. Hauy, 1801, HaUy Min., iii, 190, f. macula, * a spot.' 
from its appearance. A syn. of chiastolite, alluding particularly to the 
black centre which a crystal often shows when cut transversely, similar to 
the mascle of heraldry. 

MAOLUREITE. A. 8eyb€rU 1822, A. J. S., v, 336, in honor of 
Wm. Maclure. An obs. syn. of augite. 



MACLURITE 163 MAGNETITE 

Also used by T. Nuttall, 1823, A. J. S. , v, 246 (Maclurite). An obs. 
syn. of cbondrodite. 

MACIiURITE. See maelureite. 

MAOONITE. F, A. Oenth, 1873, Am. Phil. Soc, xiii, 396, f. 
Macon Co., Ga., where it was found. A hydrous silicate near jefferisite, 
resulting from the alteration of chlorite. 

MADOCITE. 8. Meunier, 1893, Meun. Fers Met., 39, f. Madoc. 
Ontario, where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 

MAQNEFERRTTE. Variant of magnoferrite. 

MAQNESIAN ALUM. A. A. Hayes, 1844, A. J. S., xlvi, 360, f. 
its composition. A syn. of pickeringite. 

MAQNESIANITE. Variant of magnesite. 

MAQNESIAN MARBLE. T. Nuttall, 1822, A. J. S., iv, 17. A 
name suggested for magnesite, on account of its resemblance to marble. 

MAQNESINITRE. /. /. If. Huot, 1841, Huot Min., ii. 431, f. its 
composition. A syn. of nitro-magnesite. 

MAGNESIOFERRITE. /. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min.. 152. f. its 
composition. Called magnoferrite at first by G. F, Rammelsberg, 1859, 
Pogg. Ann., cvii, 451. Black, octahedral crystals from Vesuvius, 
composed of magnesia and oxide of iron. 

MAGNESITE. /. C\ Delametherie, 1797, T. T., ii. 93, the name 
being here applied to several native compounds of magnesium, the carbon- 
ate being named first. A. Brongniari in 1807, Brongn. Min.. 1, 489, 
includes under the name several magnesian minerals, particularly the 
carbonate and the silicate (meerschuum). In 1808 D. L. O, Karsten, Karst. 
Tab., 48, confines the name to the carbonate, and he has been followed by 
many mineralogists. F. S, Beudant in 1824, Beud. Min., 410, uses the 
name giobertite for magnesium carbonate, and calls the silicate magnesite, 
p. 379, in which he has been followed by most French writers. Carbon- 
ate of magnesium usually more or less mixed with the silicate, found 
sometimes crystalline, but more often in compact, white masses. 

MAGNESO-OALOITE. E. J. Chapman, 1843, Chap. Min., 21, f. 
its composition. An obs. syn. of dolomite. 

MAGNETIC IRON. From Magnetischer Eisenstein. An early 
name for magnetite. 

MAGNETIC PYRITES. A, G. Werner, 1789, Berg Jour., i, 383 
(Magnetischer-Kies), alluding to its magnetic property. A syn. of 
pyrrhotite. 

MAGNETITE. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 551 (Magnetit). 
f. the older name. Magneteisenstein. Proto-sesquioxide of iron, a 
common iron ore. 



MAQNETOPYRITE 164 MALTHA 

MAaNBTOPYRITB. E, B, Gloeker, 1839, Glock. Min., 825> 
(Magnetopy rites). An obs. syn. of pyrrhotite. 

MAQNBTOSTIBIAN. L. J. Igelstrom, 1894, Zt. Kryst., xxiU, 212. 
Magnetic antimonate of iron and manganese, 'whence the name. 

MAQNOCHROMITB. G. M. Bock, [1868, Inaiig. Dissert.], 1873, 
Zt. Geol., XXV, 394, f. its composition. A var. of chromite, containiDg a 
large amount of magnesium. 

MAONOFERRITE. See magnesioferrite. 

MAQNOFRANKLINITB. A local name, 1892, Geol. Surv. N. J. 
Final Rept., ii, (1), 14, perhaps a corruption of manganoferrite, a name 
suggested by Q. A. Koenig, but not published, for the var. of franklinite 
from Sterling Hill, N. J., which contains little zinc, and is highly mag- 
netic 

MAQNOLITB. F. A, Genth, 1877, Am. Phil. Soc, xvii. 118. f. the 
Magnolia district, Colo., where it was found. A tellurate of mercury, 
found in minute, white needles. 

MAKITB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 61. No derivation given. 

A syn. of thenardite. 

MAIiACHITB. /. G. Wallerius, 1747, Wall. Min., 278 (Malachit), 
f. Pliny's molochitis, 77, Pliny Hist., Bk. 37, 36, f. tioXoxv. 'mallow.' 
alluding to its green color. The o had been changed to a much earlier 
than 1747, for we find it written malachites by R. lA>veU, 1661, in his Univ. 
Hist, of Minerals, p. 114. Hydrous carbonate of copper, found usually 
massive in different tints of green. 

MAUICOIJTE. P. a AUldgaard, 1800, Ann. Chem., xxxii, 196, f. 
jiidXdKoS, 'soft, 'because it is softer than associated minerals, and Az6o?» 
A syn. of diopside. 

MAI.ACON. Th, Scheerer, 1844, Pogg. Ann., Ixii, 436 (Malakon), f. 
fitdXdKoi *soft.* A brown var. of zircon, somewhat altered, and de- 
cidedly softer than the original. 

MAIiDONITB. G. H, 8. Ulrich, [1869. Rept. Min. Statistics of 
Victoria], 1870, A. J. S., 2d, 1, 272, f. Maldon, Victoria, its locality. A 
var. of gold, containing bismuth. 

MALINOWSEITB. A. Raimondi, [1876, Min. Chili, 5th App.], 
1878. Min. Perou, 123, in honor of E. Malinowski. A var. of tetrahe- 
drite. containing much lead and silver. 

MALIiARBITB. A. Garnot, 1879, Bull. Soc. Min., ii, 117, in honor 
of E. Mallard. A h3'^drous sulphate of manganese, found in colorless, 
fibrous masses. 

MALTHA. Pliny, 77, Pliny Hist., Bk. 2. 108, f. //a'AO^, 'soft pitch/ 
Mineral tar or viscid bitumen. 



MAIiTHAOITE 165 MANGANHEDENBERGITII 

MAIiTHACITE. A. Brdthaupi, 1837, Jour. Pk. Cb., x, 510 (Mal- 
thazit), f. juaXBdKoi, 'soft.' A var. of fullers' earth. 

MAMANITB. A. Gcebel, 1865, Acad. St. Pet. Bull., ix, 16, f. 
Maman, Persia, its locality. A sulphate similar to polyhalite, but some- 
what different in composition. 

MANACHANITE. Variant of menacbanite. 

MANOINITB. /. D. Dana, 1844, Dana Min., 528, f. the hill Mau- 
cino, near Leghorn, its supposed locality. A zinc mineral from Tuscany, 
the composition of which is doubtful. 

MANGAN-AMPHIBOLE. R. Hermann, 1849, Jour. Pk. Cb., 
xlvii, 7 (Mangan-Amphibol), f. its composition. A syn. of rhodonite. 

MANQANAPATITB. M. Stewert, 1874, Zt. Nat. Halle, x, 339 
(Manganapatit). A var. of apatite containing manganese. 

MANQANBLBNDB. A. G, Werner, 1817, Hoff. Min., iv, (2), 197, 
f . its composition. A syn. of alabandite. 

MANGANBRUCITB. L. J, Igelstrom, 1882, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., 
xxxix, (2), 83 (Manganbrucit). A var. of brucite containing much man- 
ganese. 

MANGANOHLORTTB. A, Edmberg, 1890. Geo!. For. F5rh., xii, 
580 (Manganchlorit). A manganiferous var. of clinochlore, one of the 
chlorite group. 

MANGANDISTHBNB. A. v. Lasaulx, 1872, Nied. Ges. Bonn, 
xxi\ <1 (Mangandisthen), f. its composition and its resemblance to cyanite 
(dial. .Olio). An obs. syn. of ardennite. 

MANGANBPIDOTB. L. Cordier, 1803, Jour, des M., xiii, 135 
(Epidote Mangan^sif^re), f. its composition. A syn. of piedmontite. 

MANGANBSB ALUM. /. D. Dana, 1844, Dana Min., 217. Na- 
tive manganese alum, called apjohnite. 

MANGANBSB GLANOB. D. L. G. Karsten, 1808, Karst. Tab., 
72 (Manganglanz), alluding to its composition and appearance. A syn. 
of alabandite. 

MANGANBSB SPAR. A. G. Werner, 1817, Wern. Letz., 24 (Man- 
ganspath), alluding to its composition. A syn. of rhodonite. 

Sometimes also a syn. of rhodochrosite. 

MANGANGRAPHITB. A. Breiihaupt, 1820, Breit. Char.. 5 (Man- 
gangraphit), f. mangan, 'manganese,' and y/jd0eiy, * to write,' because it 
is a manganese mineral which will mark on paper. An obs. syn. of 
wad. 

MANGANHBDBNBBRGITB. K Weibull, 1883, Geol. FOr. 
FOrh., vi, 506 (Manganhedenbergit). A var. of hedenbergite containing 
over six per cent of manganese oxide. 



MANaANHISINGBRITB 166 MAGANPEOTOIilTE 

MANQANHISINGERmS. M, WeUmll, 1884, Vet. Ak. Stock. 
Oefv., xli, (9), 21 (MangaD-Hisingerit). A var. of hisingerite containing 
much niiiuguuese. 

MANQANIDOORASX!. A. v, Lasaulx, 1879, Zt. Kryst., iv, 171 
(Mangauidocras). A var. of idocrase (vesuvianite) containing several per 
cent of manganese. 

MANQANITB. W, Haidinger, 1831 (read 1827), Roy. Soc. Ed., xi, 
122, f. manganese, in allusion to the metal which it contains. Hydrous 
sesquioxide of manganese, occurring in iron-black crystals, with a brilliant, 
metallic lustre. 

MANQANJASPBR. A. P. J. du Menil, 1819, Ann.de Phys., 1x1, 
197 (Mimgan-jaspis), f. its composition and appearance. An obs. syn. of 
photicite. 

MANQANOOALOITB. A, Bretthaupi, 1846, Pogg. Ann., Ixix, 429 
(Manganocalcit), f. its composition. A calciferous var. of rhodochrodte. 

Also used as a syn. of spartaite. 

MANGANOFERRITE. See magnofranklinite. 

MANGANOUTE. E. F. Gloeker, 1831, Glock Min., 648 (Mangan- 
olith), f. Mangan, alluding to its composition, and AzOoS. An obs. syn. 
of rhodonite. 

MANGANOMAGNETTTE. G, Flink, 1886, Vet. Ak. Stock. Bih., 
xii , (2), 20 (Manganomngnetit), f. its composition. A syn. of jacobsite. 

MANGANOPHYLLITE. L. /. Igelstrom, 1872, Jahrb. Min., 296 
(Manganophyll), f. manganese and (pvXXov, 'a leaf,' alluding to its com- 
position and appearance. A var. of biotite containing manganese. 

MANGANOSIDERITE. C, Bayer, 1873, Nat. Ver. Brttnn, xu. 20 
(Manganosiderit), f . its composition. A ferriferous var. of rhodochrosite, 
resembling sphaBrosiderite. 

MANGANOSITB. C. W. BUmstrand, 1874, Geol. F5r. FOrh., ii. 
179 (Mauganosit), f. its composition. Manganese protoxide, found in 
minute, green crystals, which turn b|ack on exposure. 

MANGANOSTIBnTB. L. J. IgeUtrOm, 1884, Geol. FOr. F5rh., vii, 
210 (Manganostibiit), f. mangan, 'manganese,* and stibium, 'antimony,' 
alluding to its composition. Antimoniate of manganese, found in small, 
black grains in limestone. 

MANGANOSTUiBITE. Error for manganostibiite. 

MANGANOTANTAIilTIS. Variant of mangantantalite. 

MANGANOWOLFRAMITE. A, Breithaupi, 1847, Breit. Handb., 
iii, 866 (Manganowolf ramit), f . its comi>osition. An obs. syn. of hflbnerite. 

MANGANPBOTOIilTB. /. F. Willitwis, 1890, Zt. Kryst., xviii, 
386 (Manganpektolith). A var. of pectolite containing manganese. 



MANOANTJUn^AZiITB 167 BIARIALTTB 

MANGANTANTAIilTX!. A. E. Nordemkidld, 1877, Geo). FOr. 
FDrb., iii, 284 (Mangantantalit). A var. of tantalite, where the iron is 
largely replaced by manganese. 

MANIUTX!. Error for mauilite. 

MARANrm. H, F. Link, [1801, Beitrage zur Naturgeschichte, ii, 
82], 1813, Haus. Min., ii, 541. f. Sierra de MarOo, Portugal, its locality. 
An obs. syn. of chiastoHte. 

MARASMOLITZ3. C. U. Shepard, 1851, Am. Assoc., iv. 315. f. 
udpaa^oS, ' a decay,* because it so easily disintegrates, and XtOoi. A 
jxartiully decomposed sphalerite, containing free sulphur. 

MARBLE. From marmor, which included other ornamental stones 
besides marble, such as serpentine. Compact calcite of various colors, 
and capable of receiying a polish. 

MAROASITXi. From marchesita or marchasite, the derivation of 
which is uncertain. W, Uaidin^ery in 1845, Haid. Handb., 467 (Marka- 
sit), restricts the use of the name to so-called white iron-pyrites, ortho- 
rhombic in crystallization. An old name for pyrites in general. 

MAROXSUNXS. F. 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 188, f. St. 
Marcel, Piedmont, its locality. Siliceous oxide of manganese, resulting 
from the alteration of rhodonite. 

MARCHASITXS. See marcasitc. 

MARCYLITE. C, U. Sftepard, 1854, Marcy's Expl. Red Riv. of 
Louisiana, 145, after €kn. R. B. Marcy, its discoverer, and XiBoi. An 
uncertain alteration product from the decomposition of chalcopyrite. 

MAREKANITX]. P. 8. Pallas, 1793, Nord. Beyt., v, 290 (Marekan- 
ischer Stein), f . the Marekanka River, Siberia, where it was found. A 
syn. of pearlstone. 

MARGARITIS. Said to be first used by the Tyrolese mineral deal- 
ers. Name first noticed in 1823, Phill. Min., 208, f. uapyaptTtfi, *a 
pearl/ alluding to its lustre. A hydrous silicate belonging to the clin- 
tonite group, found in light-colored scales with a pearly lustre. 

Sometimes used in error for margnrodite. 

BftARaARODirB. G, E. Sohafhauil, 1843, Ann. Ch. Pharm., xlvi, 
886, f. uapydpitTfi, 'a pearl,* in allusion to its lustre. A var. of 
damouritc, having a pearly lustre and grayish white color. Margarodite 
and margarite are often interchanged. 

MARIA-GLASS. From Marienglas, so called because used in fine 
particles to coat images of the Virgin. A name for both mica and selenite. 

MARTALTTB. Q. wm Bath, 1866, Zt. Geol., xviii, 687 (Marialit), 
perhaps after the Virgin Mary, because so pure and white. A silicate 
of aluminum, calcium and sodium, very near mizzonite. 



MARIATTTB 168 BSASEBLTNTTB 

Vom Ruth refers here also to marialite of ByUo, which is a syn. 

of haUyuite. 

MARIATITE. Error for marialite. 

MARIONmi. Tf. Elderhorst, 1858, Qeol. Rept. Ark., 153, f. Marion 
Co., Ark., its locality. A syn. of hydrozincite. 

MARIPOSITIS. B. aaiiman, Jr., 1868, Acad. Cal., iii, 380, f. Mari- 
posa, Cat., its locality. An obscure mineral, found in minute, green 
scales; perhaps near fuchsite. 

MARMAmOIilTE. N, 0. Hoist, 1875, Geol. F5r. F5rh., ii. 527 
(Marmairolit), f. uapuaifjeiv, * to glisten,* alluding to its lustre, and AzSo?. 
A massive mineral of pale yellow color, belonging to the ampbibole group. 

MARMATITE. /. B. BoussingauU, 1839. Pogg. Ann., xvii, 402 (Mar- 
matit), f . Marmato, Italy, its locality. A ferriferous var. of sphalerite. 

MARMOIilNE. Variant of marmolite. 

MARMOIilTE. T, NutiaU, 1822, A. J. S., iv, 17, f. napuaipetv, 
* to glisten,' alluding to its lustre, and XiBoi. A thin, foliated var. of 
serpentine, of green color and pearly lustre. 

MARSHITG. A, Liversidge, 1892, Roy. Soc. N. S. W. Proc., xxvi. 
326, after C. W. Marsh, who first described it. An iodide of copper, 
not yet fully examined. 

MARSH ORE. A syn. of bog iron ore. 

MARTINTTE. /. H Kloos, 1887-89, Sammlungen des Geol. Reichs- 
Mus. Leiden, (2), i, 1 (Martinit), after Prof. K. Martin, who collected it. 
Hydrous phosphate of calcium found in cavities in gypsum at Cura9ao. 

MARTINSITB. C. J. B. KarsUn, 1845, Jour. Pk. Ch., xxxvi, 127 

(Martinsit), in honor of Mining Supt. Martins, of Halle. A var. of 

halite, containing about oue-tenth part of magnesium sulphate. 

Also used by A. Kenngott, 1859, Kenng. Ueb. for 1856-57, 22. A 
syn. of kieserite. 

MARTTTG A. Breithaupi, 1828, Jour. Ch. Ph., liv, 158 (Martit), f. 
Mars, Martis, the alchemistic name for iron. A pseudomorph of hema- 
tite after magnetite. 

MARTOURTTX!. JV. JSTordenskiold, 1849, Nord. Atom. Ch. Min. Syst., 
86 (Martourit), f. Martouret, France, its locality. A var. of berthierite. 

MASOAGNINXS. See mascagnite. 

MASCAaNTTG. D. L. G. KarsUn, 1800, Karst. Tab., 40 (Mas- 
cagnin), after Prof. P. Mascagni, who first described it. Sulphate ot 
ammonium, occurring in crusts and stalactitic forms near volcanoes. 

MASKELYNITE. O. Tschermak, 1872, K. Ak. Wien, Ixv, (1), 127 
(Maskelynit), after Prof. N. Story-Maskelyne, because he had examined the 
meteorite in which it was found. A silicate of aluminum and calcium. 



JOASONITB 169 MEERSCHALUMINrrE 

BSASONTTB. C. T. Jaeluon, 1840, Geol. R. I., 8d, iu honor of Owen 
Mason, of Providence, R. I. A var. of cbloritoid. 

MASRITE. //. J9. Richmond and Hussein Off, 1892, Jour. Chem. 
Soc. Trans., 1x1, 494, f. Masr, the Arabic name for Egypt, where it was 
found. A fibrous alum, containing a small amount of a supposed new 
element called masrium. 

MASSICOT. A popular French name of the artificial oxide of lead, 
used as a mineral name. Protoxide of lead, found in yellow masses, 
sometimes with a scaly structure. 

MASSIOOTTTE. Variant of massicot. 

MASTICOT. Corruption of massicot. 

MATILDITB. A. (TAchiardi, 1883. Ach. Met., 186, f. the Matilda 
mine, near Morococha, Peru, its locality. Sulphide of silver and bis- 
muth, found in slender prisms of a gray color and metallic lustre. 

MATLOOEITE. R. P. Oreg, 1851, Phil. Mag., 4th, ii. 120, f. Mat- 
lock, Derbyshire, its locality. Oxy-chloride of lead, found iu tabular 
crystals and crystalline plates of a yellowish color. 

Also used by E. J. Cfuipman, 1843, Chap. Min., 40. A syn. of phos- 
genite. 

MATRIOITIS. JV. 0. Hoist, 1875, Geol. FOr. FOrh., ii, 527 (Matricil), 
f. mater, matris, 'mother,' because it is the matrix of another mineral. 
Hydrous silicate of magnesium and calcium, near villarsite. 

BSAUUilTE. /. D. Dana, 1849. Dana. Geol. Pacif., 230, f. Maui, 
one of the Sandwich Isl., where it was found, and XiOoi. An obs. syn. 
of labrndorite. 

MAZITIS. H. Laspeyres, 1872, Jahrb. Min., 408 (Mnxit), in honor of 
Max Braun, a Belgian mining engineer. A syn. of leudhillite. 

BSAXT. A corruption of marchasite, used formerly by Cornish miners. 

MAZAPUilTE. Q.A. Koenig, 1888. Acad. Xat. Sci. Proc, 192. f. 
the Mazapil Dist., Mexico, its locality. Hydrous arsenate of iron and 
calcium, found in slender, black prisms. 

MB A DOW-ORE . An early syn. of bog ore. 

MEALY ZEOLITE. A, Q. Werner, 1780, Wem. Cronst., 243 
(Mehl-zeolith), alluding to its appearance. An obs. syn. of both natro- 
lite and mesolite. 

MEDJIDITE. /. L. 8miih, 1848, A. J. S., 2d, v, 337, in honor of 
Abdul Medjid, Sultan of Turkey, because found iu Turkey. A some- 
what doubtful hydrous sulphate of uranium and calcium. 

MEERSOHALUMINTTE. W. A. Ross, 1871, Jour. Ch. Soc., 2d, 
iz, 260, because an aluminous mineral resembling meerschaum. A syn. 
of pholerite. 



MEERSCHAUM 170 MBLANITB 

MEERSCHAUM. From meer, * the sea/ and schaum, * foam, 'al- 
luding to its light and frothy appearance. A popular syn. of sepio- 

lite. 

MEGABASITE. A, Breithaupt, 1852, Berg. Hat., xi, 189 (Mega- 
basit), f. u^ydi, * greater, more,' and (idai^, * base,' because it was 
thought to contain more basic ingredients than the original wolframite. 
A syn. of hUbuerite. 

MEGABROMITE. A. Breithaupt, 1859, Berg. Hut., xviii,449 (Mega- 
broniit), f. jueyd'i, 'greater, more,' and Brom, 'bromine.' The var. of 
embolite containing the largest amount of bromine. 

MBIONITB. R. J. Uaiiy, 1801, Hatty Min., ii, 422, f. ^eiooy, ' less,' 
because the pyramid is less acute than in vesuvianite. Silicate of alum- 
inum and calcium, found in colorless or white crystals in lava. 

MEIiACONISE. See melaconite . 

MELACONITB. /. B. Dana, 1850. Dana Min., 518, f. F, 8, Beu^ 
da Ufa earlier name Melaconise, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 714, f. jn^Xd^, 
'black,' and Koyti, 'dust,' from its appearance. A syn. of tenorite. 

MEIiANASPHALT. C. M. Wet/ierill, 1852, Am. Phil. Soc. Trans.^ 
X, 353 (Melau-Asphalt), //eAaS, -dvo^, ' black,' and asphaltum. A syn» 
of albcrtite. 

MELANCHLORE. /. JV. Fuc?is, 1839, Jour. Pk. Ch., xvii, ITS 
(Melanchlor), f. //FAa5, -dyoi, 'black,' and x^^P^^f 'green,' in allu- 
sion to its color. A hydrous phosphate of iron of a blackish-green 
color, probably derived from the alteration of triphylite. 

MEIiANCHYME. W. Uaidinger, 1851, Lotos, i, 216 (Melan- 
chym), f. //6Ad5, -dvo^, 'black,* and x^juo^, 'juice,' alluding to its 
appearance and origin. A syn. of rochlederite. 

MELANEIiLITE. /. B. Bana, 1868, Dana Min., 750, modified f. 
melanchym and Xi^oi, A black hydrocarbon, forming part of rochled- 
erite. 

MELANQLANCE. F, MoTis, 1820, Mohs Char., 90 (Melane- 
Glance), f. //e'AaS, -ayoS, ' black,' and its shining appearance. Anobs. 
syn. of stephanite. 

MELANQRAPHITE. TT. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 61» 
(Melangraphit), probably f. ^4\d<i, -dvo?, 'black,' and y pa 0€iy, 'to 
write. An obs. syn. of graphite. 

MELANHYDRITE. A. Kraniz, [1859, Nat. Ver. Rheinl., xvi, 164], 
1862, Kenng. Ueb., for 1860, 39 (Melanhydrit), f. )ue'Aa5, -ayoS. 'black/ 
and vSoop, ' water,' from its appearance and composition. A black var. 
of palagonite. 

MBLANITE. A, G. Werner, 1799, Emm. Min., i, 172 (Melanit).. f . 



MBLAMOCERITB 171 MBLIUTB 

^€Xdi, 'dvo^, 'black/ alluding to its color. A black var. of garnet 
included under andradite. 

MBUkNOOBRITE. W. C. BrOgger, 1887, Geol. FOr. FOrh., ix. 
251 (Melanocerit), f. n4X&i, -dvoi, 'black/ and cerium, alluding to its 
color and composition. A fluo-silicate of the cerium and yttrium metals, 
found in black, tabular crystals. 

MBIiANOOHROITB. R Hermann, 1888. Fogg. Ann., zxviii, 162 
(Melanochroit), f. fieXdvo, -xpooS, 'swarthy,' in allusion to its dark color. 
An obs. syn. of pboenicochroite. 

MBLANOLITX]. H. WurU, 1850, Dana Min., 679, f. //^Adt^, -dvoS, 
' black,* and Xi^o?, in allusion to its color. An ill-defined cbloritic min- 
eral, of a black color. 

MBIiANOPHLOGITB. A. v. Lasaulx, 1876, Jabrb. Min., 250 
(Melanophlogit). t. ^eXdi, -dvoi, 'black,' and (pXtyeaOat, * to be burned,* 
because it turns black when heated. A substance found in minute 
cubes on sulphur, consisting principally of silica. 

MBLANOSIDERITX!. J. P. Cooke, 1875, Am. Acad., x, 451, f. 
fii4X&i, 'dvoi, 'black,' and aidtfpo^, 'iron,' alluding to its color and com- 
position. An iron hydrate, containing silica; perhaps a basic silicate of 
iron. 

MBLAN08TIBIAN. L. J. Jgelstrom, 1892, Zt. Kryst., xxi, 246, f. 
li4Xdi, -dvoif 'black,* and stibium, 'antimony,' alluding tr) iis color and 
composition. A black, foliated antimonate of iron and manganese. 

MBIiANOTBErm. Q. Lindstrom, 1880, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., 
zzxvii, (6), 56 (Melanotekit), f. //^/l«5, -a^o?, 'black,* and reKeiv, 'to 
melt,* because it fuses to a black bead, and also because of its resemblance 
to hyalotekite. Silicate of lead and iron, found in black, opaque 
masses. 

BSHLANOTHALUTE. A. Scacchi, 1870, Nap. Ac. Rend., ix, 87 
(Melanotallo), f. /ueXd^, -dvo?, 'black,* and 0aAAd5, 'a young shoot,* in 
allusion to its color. Oxy-chloride of copper, found in thin, black scales 
at Vesuvius. 

MBLANTBRIA. See melanterite. 

MELANTBRITIS. E. J. Chapman, 1843, Chap. Min., 14 (Melan- 
therite), adapted from F. S. BeudanVs Mclanterie, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 482, 
f. pteXavTTfpia, 'copperas.' Hydrous iron sulphate, native copperas. 

MBIaANTHBRITE. See melanterite. 

MBLIUTB. J. C, Delameiherie, Delam. T. T., ii. 278, f. iteV, 
•honey,* alluding to its honey-yellow color, and Xi^oi. A sili(^ate of 
calcium, aluminum and other bases, found in honey -yellow to brown 
crystala. 



MBUNINB 173 BCEMBOHIMITB 

BftBUNINB. Variant of melbiite. 

MXSLINITEI. E, F. Oloeker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 186, f. //^cko?, 
'quince-yellow/ alluding to its color. A yellow clay, quite similar to 
yellow ochre. 

Also used sometimes in error for menilite. 

MEIilNOPHANB. Th. ScTieerer, 1852, Jour. Pk. Ch.. Iv, 449 
(Melinophan), probably f . ti7fXtvo<i, * quiuce-yellow,* and (paiveoBat, * to 
appear,' recalling its yellow color and its similarity to leucopbaue. A 
syn. of melipbanite, to which it was changed by J. D. Dana, who con- 
sidered it incorrectly formed. 

MEUNOSG. F, 8..Beudant, 1832. Beud. Min., ii, 664, f. fiiXtvoi 
for fiTJXivoi, * quince-yellow,' alluding to its color. An obs. syn. of 
wulfenite. 

MBIJPHANX!. See melipbanite. 

MELIPHANITX!. J. D. Dana, 1867, A. J. S., 2d, xliv, 405 (Mell- 
phane), f. jn4Xi, 'honey,* and (pcxiyeoBai, *to appear,' alluding to its 
£olor. Fluo-silicate of glucinum, calcium and sodium. 

MELLIIilTE. Variant of mellite. 

MEIiliTTE. J. F. Omelin, 1793. Linn. Syst. Nat., iii, 282 (Mellites), 
t. fieXi, * honey,' and XiBoi, Mellate of aluminum, occurring in honey- 
yellow, octahedral crystals. 

MBLONITB. F, A, Genth, 1868, A. J. S., 2d, xlv, 313, f. the 
Melouese mine, Caleveras Co., Cal., its locality. Nickel telluride, of 
a reddish-white color. 

MEIiOPSITE. A. Breiihaupt, 1841, Breit. Handb., ii, 360 (Melop- 
sit), f. u^Xov, 'an apple,' and o^ok, 'meat,' that is, 'apple flesh,* because 
the mineral resembles it in texture. A hydrous silicate of magnesium, 
not well defined. 

MENACCANTTE. Wm, Oregor, 1791, Chem. Ann., i, 40 (Mena- 
chanite), f. Menaccan, erroneously spelt Menachan, Cornwall, its locality. 
A var. of ilmenite. 

MENAOHANITX!. See menaccanite. 

MENARDITE. Error for thenardite. 

MENDIFFITE. Error for mendipite. 

MENDIPITE. E. F. Olocker, 1839, Glock. Min., 604 (Mendipit), f. 
the Mendip Hills, Somersetshire, Eng., its locality. Oxy-chloride of 
lead, found in white, columnar or fibrous masses. 

MENDOZITE. J, D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 653, f. Mendoza, 
Argentine Republic, its locality. Soda alum, found in white, fibrous 
masses. 

MBNEGHINrrE. E, BecJd, 1852, A. J. S., 2d, xiv, 60, after Prof. 



MBNOXTB 178 BCE88BZJTB 

J. Meneghini, of Pisa, who first observed it. Sulph-antimonide of lead, 
found fibrous, or in slender, prismatic crystals. 

MENGITZS. J7. /. Brooke, 1881, Phil. Mag., 2d, x, 189, after 
J. Menge, who discovered it. An obs. syn. of monazite. 

Also used by Q, Bow, 1842, Rose Reis., ii, 88 (Mengit). A mineral 
found in embedded black crystals, near columbite, probably identical 
with it. 

MBNUJTB. H. B. de Sausiure, 1795. Delam. T. T., iii, 461, f. 
Menilmontant, near Paris, its locality. A var. of opal, occurring in 
reniform masses of a brownish color. 

BSERCURY. The metal as a mineral, usually called native mercury. 

BftBROXENB. W. Uaidinger, 1845. Haid. Handb.. 521 (Meroxen). 
from A, BreWiaupts earlier name Astrites meroxenus, 1841, Brcit. Handb., 
ii, 882, probably f. juifjo^, 'a part,' and leVoS, 'strange/ because it is a 
part of what had been called imiaxial mica. A var. of biotite. 

MB8ABITJB. H. V, Wincfiell, 1893, Am. Inst. M. E , xxi, 660, f. 
Mesabi, Minn., its locality. A name suggested for the ochreous goethite 
found so abundantly there. 

MBSITINE. See mesitite. 

BSBSITINE SPAR. See mesitite. 

MBSmTB. A. Breithaupt, 1827, Pogg. Ann., xi, 170 (Mesitinspath), 
also 1847, Pogg. Ann., Ixx, 146 (Mesitin), f. neairTji, *a go-between,* be- 
cause its rhombohedron is intermediate in angle between magnesite and 
aiderite. Carbonate of magnesium and iron, found in yellowish or brown, 
rhombohedral crystals. 

MBSOIiE. See mesolite. 

BSBSOLINB. Variant of mesolite. 

MBSOUTE. J. N. FacTis find A. F. Qehlen, 1816, Jour. Ch. Ph., 
xviii, 16(Me8olith) f. ^iaoi, 'middle,' because chemically between natro- 
lite and scolecite, and XiBoi, A hydrous silicate of aluminum, calcium 
and sodium, usually found in fibrous or radiated masses. 

J. J, Benelius applied the name mesole, 1822, Ed. Phil. Jour., vii, 6, 
to a var. of thomsonite from the FarOe Is., and mesoline, I.e., to a white, 
granular mineral from the same locality, now classed with levynite, be- 
cause of their close relation to mesolite. 

MB80TTPE. R, /. Hafiy, 1801, HaUy Min.. iii, 107. f. ^4ao^. 
'middle.' and tvtco?, 'type,' because the form of its crystal is interme- 
diate between the forms of analcite and stilbite. This name included 
natrolite, scolecite, mesolite and thomsonite. and is now an obs. syn. of 
each. 

MB38BLITB. W. Muthmann, 1889. Zt. Eryst., xvii, 93 (Messelit), 



MXS88INGITB 174 METAZITB 

f. Messel, Hesse, its locality. A hydrous phosphate of iron nnd calcium, 
found in small, whitish, tabular crystals on coal. 

MBSSINQITB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 26, f. Messing. 

' brass,' adapted from the old name, MessiugblQthe. A syn. of aurichal- 
cite. 

METABRUSHITE. A. A, Julten, 1865, A. J. S., 2d, xl, 871. f. 
//era ' with,* and brushite, because found with it. Hydrous phosphate 
of calcium, found in the Sombrero guano. 

METACHLORTTX!. K. List, 1852, Zt. Geol., iv, 634 (Metachlorit), 
f. nerd, * after,* and chlorite, because the mineral was placed after chlorite. 
A somewhat doubtful chloiite-like mineral from the Harz. 

METACINNABARITE. Q, E. Moore, 1870, Jour. Pk. Ch., ii, 328 
(Metacinnabarit), f. //era, 'with,' and cinnabar, because found with it. 
Isometric sulphide of mercury, of grayish-black color. 

METAGADOLINITE. E. QoldsmWi, 1890, Jour. Anal. Ch., iv, 24, 
f. //era', 'with,* and gadolinite, because found with it. An alteration 
product of gadolinite, of a red color. 

METAIiLOIDAL DIALLAGE. R. J. Hatty, 1801. HaUy Min., iii, 
90 (Diallage metalloide), so named because it is a diallage with metallic 
lustre. An obs. syn. of hypersthene. 

METALONCHIDITE. F. v, Sandberger, 1887, Oester. Berg, und 
Htlttenman-Zeitung, xxxv, 531, f. //era, 'with,* and lonchidite, because it 
stands near it. A var. of marcasite containing less arsenic than lonchi- 
dite. 

METANOCERITE. F. v. Sandberger, 1892, Jahrb. Min., i, 221 
(Metanocerin), f. //era', 'with,' and nocerite. A mineral not fully ex- 
amined, placed near nocerite. 

METASERICITE. F. v. Sandberger, [1882, Sand. Unt. Erz., i, 77], 
1882, Zt. Kryst., vii, 411 (Metasericit), f. //era*, 'with,' and sericite, from 
its close relation with sericite. A hydrous mica, classed under da> 
mourite. 

METASTIBNITE. G. F. Becker, 1888, U. S Geol. Surv. Mon. 13, 
343, f. //era', 'with,' and stibnite, because found with stibnite. Sulphide 
of antimony, occurring as a brick-red deposit at Steamboat Springs, Cal. 

METAVOIjTAITE. Variant of metavoltine. 

METAVOLTINE. J. Blaas, 1883, K. Ak. Wien, Ixxxvii, (1). 155, f. 
//era', * with,' and voltine, because it was found with it. Hydrous sul- 
phate of iron, sodium and potassium, found in yellow masses made up of 
small scales. 

METAXITE. A. Breithaupi, 1832 Breit. Char., 113 (Metaxlt), f. 
juera^a, * silk,' alluding to its lustre. An obs. syn. of picrolite. 



BfBTAXOITB 175 BfllOROOUNB 

BfETAXOITB. A. B. Arppe, 1861 (read 1859),Soc. Sci Fenu., vi,580, 
80 named from its resemblance to metaxite. A massive or crystalline, 
greenish, hydrous silicate of aluminum, iron, calcium and magnesium. 

BfBTBORIO IRON. Native iron of meteoric origin, usually found 
alloyed with nickel. 

MEXICAN ONTX. A stalactitic var. of calcite, usei. as an orna- 
mental stone, so called because it was first found in Mexico, and re- 
sembles onyx. 

BSHTMAOITB. A. Camot, 1874, C. R, Ixxlx. 640, f. Meymac, 
France, its locality. Hydrated tungstic acid, formed from the altenitioa 
of scheelite. 

BdARGTRITE. H. BoU, 1829, Fogg. Ann., xv, 470 (Miargyrit), 
f. fi€t(ov, 'less/ and apyvpo^, * silver,' because it contains less silver than 
red silver ore. Sulph-antimonide of silver, found in black, tabular or 
prismatic crystals. 

BOASOITB. WutUg, 1814, Ann. Phil., iii, 158 (Miaszit), f. 

Miask, Ural Mts., its locality. A mixture of strontianite and calcite. 

B9I0A. Probably from micare, ' to shine,' in allusion to its lustre. 
A group name including muscovite, phlogopite, biotite and other mica- 
ceous minerals. 

MIOAOBOUS IRON ORB. A var. of hematite with micaceous 
structure. 

BnOAPHnJTB. /. Brunner, 1804, Moll Jahrb. Ann., iii, (2), 294 
(Micafilit), f. mica and 4>iXo%, ' a friend,' because it is often found with 
mica. An obe. syn. of andalosite. 

MIOAPHTUiITB. Error for micaphilite. 

MIOARBLLB. B. Kinoan, 1794, Kirw. Mln., i, 212, f. iU resem- 
blance to mica. A micaceous mineral which has externally the form of 
scapolite, and results from its alteration. 

B9IOHABUTB. /. W, WebaUr, 1821, A. J. 8., iii, 891, f. St. 
Michael. Azores, its locality. A syn. of florite. 

BfllOHABLSONITB. /. D, Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 289. after J. 
A. Michaelson, who first analyzed it. A syn. of erdmannite. 

BfllOHBL-LBVYTB. A, Laeraix, 1889, C. R., cviii, 1128, in honor 
of A. Michel-Levy. A syn. of barite. 

BfllOROBROBOTE. A. BreUhaupU 1859, Berg Httt., xviii, 449 
(MIkrobromit), f. julKpoi, 'small,' and Brom, 'bromine.' The var. of 
embolite containing the smallest quantity of bromine, and in which 
bromine is a subordinate constituent. 

MIOROOUNB. A. Breithaupt, 1880, Jour. Ch. Ph., Ix, 824 
(MikroUin), f. fA\Kp6%, 'small,' and KXivetv, 'to incline,' because the 



MIOROUTB 176 BULARITB 

angle between its cleavage planes differs a little from 90**. A triclinic 
feldspar, otherwise differing little from orthoclase. 

MIOROLITE. G. U Shepard, 1835. A. J. S., xxvii. 8dl, f. fixKpoi, 
'small/ alluding to the size of the crystals fii-st found, and Az6o?. Cal- 
cium pyro-tantalate, found in yellow or brown, resinous ci-ystals. 

MICROPHYLUTE. A. Sclirauf, 1869, K. Ak. Wien, Ix, (1), 1029 
(MicrophylHt), f. //JK'o/aS, 'small/ and 0vXXov, *a leaf.' Microscopic 
inclusions in labradonte, occurring in indistinct, crystalline scales. 

MIOROPIiACITE. A, Schrauf, 1869, K. Ak. Wien, Ix, (1), 1029 
(Mikroplakit), f. Mit^i^o^* * small,* and nXd^, - nXaKo^, 'a tablet.* Mi- 
croscopic inclusions in labradorite, occuriiug in rectangular tables. 

MIOROSOHORIilTB. E. E. Schmid, 1876, Zt. Geol., xxviii, 95 
(Mikroschorlit), f. fiiKpoi, 'small,* and schorl. A crystallite observed 
in kaolin, and thought to be schorl (tourmaline). 

MICROSOMMITE. A, Scacchi, 1873, Nap. Ac. Atti. v, 18, f. 
fiiKpo^, ' small,* and Somma, because in small crystals, from Mt. 
Somma. Silicate of aluminum, calcium, sodium and potassium, con- 
taining also chlorine and sulphur tri-oxide. 

MICROVERMICULITE. E. E. Sehmid, 1876, Zt. Geol., xxviii, 94 
(Mikrovermiculit), f. ^litcpoi, 'small,* and vermiculus, *a little worm,' al- 
luding to its size and appearance. Crystallites of vermiform shape, noticed 
iu kaolin. 

MIDDLETONITE. /. F, W. Johnston, 1838. Phil. Mag., 8d, xii, 
261, f. the Middleton collieries, near Leeds, its locality. A fossil resin of 
a reddish-brown color. 

MISMTTG. M. H. Klaproih, 1802, Klap. Beit., iii. 292 (Miemit), f. 
Miemo, Tuscany, its locality. A greenish var. of dolomite. 

MIESITB. A. BreithaupU 1841, Breit. Handb., ii, 285 (Miesit), f. 
Mies, Bohemia, its locality. A brown var. of pyromorphite. 

MIEROKUN. See microcline. 

MIEROTINE. O, Tschermak, 1865. K. Ak. Wien, 1, (l),606(Mikro- 
tin). f. fiiKftoTTj^f 'littleness,* alluding to the size of its crystals. A 
name given to small crystals of plagioclase as seen embedded in volcanic 
rocks. 

MILANTTB. E, Tietee, 1870. Geol. Reich. Jahrb., xx, 589 (Milanit), 
in honor of Prince Milan, of Servia, from whose dominions it came. A 
var. of halloysite. 

MILARTTE. A. Kenngott, 1870, Jahrb. Min., 81 (Milarit), f. Val 
Milar, Switzerland, erroneously supposed to be its locality. A silicate of 
aluminum, potassium and calcium, found in small, glassy cryBtals, more 
correctly named giuffite. 



MILKY QUARTZ 177 MIONTTB 

BAILKY QUARTZ. A popular name for quartz of a milk-white 
color, and nearly opaque. 

MIIXERITX!. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb.. 561 (Millerit), 
probably in honor of Prof. W. H. Miller. Sulphide of nickel, usually 
found iu brass-yellow, capillary crystals. 

MILOSOHIN. See miloscbite. 

MUiOSOHITII. 8. A, W. v. Herder, 1889, Pogg. Ann., xlvii. 485 
(Miloschin). probably in honor of Prince Milosch, of Servia. A hydrous 
silicate of aluminum, near allophaue, but containing chromium. 

MIMBTBNB. ) 

MIMETB8B. V See mimetite. 

MIMETBSmS. ) 

MIMBTITE. F. 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 594 (Mimetese), 
f. jiil/iT^rifi, 'an imitator,' from its resemblance to pyromorphite. Changed 
to mimeteue by C, U, Shepard, 1885, Shep. Min., ii, 46; to mimetesite by 
A. Breiihaupt, 1841, Breit. Handb.. ii, 289 (Mimetesit); and to its present 
form by W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 508 (Mimetit). Arsenate of 
lead, found in yellow to brown crystals, resembling pyromorphite. 

BIINBRAL ADIPOCBRE. W, T. Brande, [1821, Brande's Ele- 
mentary Chemistry], 1823, Ann. Phil., 2d, v, 190, f. its resemblance to ani- 
mal fat. An obs. syn. of hatchettite. 

BSINBRAL OAOUTOHOUO. A popular name for elaterite, elastic 
bitumen. 

BUNERAL OHAROOAIi. R. Jameson, 1805. Jam. Min., ii, 90, f. 
A, O, Werner's earlier name, Mineralische Holzkoble. A charcoal-like 
substance, sometimes found between layers of coal. 

BIINBRAL OOAIj. A popular name for native coal, to distinguish 
it from charcoal. 

BIINBRAIi OUi. An early popular name for petroleum. 

BUNBRAL PITOH. A popular name for asphaltum. 

BSINBRAIi TAIaLOW. An early popular name for hatchettite. 

BSINBRAL TAR. A popular name for pitt-asphalt (viscid bitumen) 
or asphaltum. 

BfllNBRAL WAX. A popular name for ozocerite. 

"^^ A. Oautier, 1898, C. R., cxvi, 1171, f. the Minerva 



grotto, Herault, France, where it was found. Phosphate of aluminum, 
with seven molecules of water. 

BUNIUM. The Latin name for red lead, applied to the substance as 
a mineral. 

Also sometimes used in its older meaning of cinnabar. 

MIONTTB. Variant of meionite. 



MIRABIIiITXS 178 MOLARTTB 

MIRABILITE. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 488 (Mirabilit), 
f. the older chemical name 'sal mirabile/ the expression used by Glauber 
when he discovered it. Native sulphate of soda, often found as an 
efflorescence. 

MmiQUDDITB. A. Fremel, 1872, Jahrb. Min., 933 (Miriqufdit). f. 
Miriqiiidiwald, Saxony, its locality. An obscure compound of arsenic, 
phosphorus, lead and iron, not analyzed. 

MISENTTE. A. Scaechi, 1849, Nap. Ac. Rend., viii, 332, f. Cape 
Miseue, near Naples, its locality. Hydrous potassium sulphate, found in 
white, silky fibres. 

MISPIOEEL. An old word of obscure origin, an early form being 
mistpuckel. A syn. of arsenopyrite. 

MIST. Pliny, 77, Pliny Hist., Bk. 34. 31, f. ///o-u. Dioseorades, 50, 
Dioscor., Y, 116. A yellow sulphate of iron, perhaps copiapite, but not 
DOW positively identified. 

MISTUTE. </. 2>. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 656. f. misy, itsold name, 
and Xi&oi, A name suggested as a substitute for copiapite. 

Anxrm. a, Sckrauf, 1879. Zt. Kryst., iv, 277 (Mixit), after A. 
Mixa, from whom it was received. Hydrous arsenate of copper and 
bismuth, found in fibrous, green incrustations. 

MIZZONTTE. A. Scacchi, 1853, Pogg. Ann. Erg., iii, 478 (Miz 
zonit). f. juei^oov. 'greater.' because the axis of its prism is longer than in 
meionite. A member of the scapolite group, intermediate in composi- 
tion between meionite and marialite, 

MOOHA STONE. Said to have come from Mocha, Arabia, hence 
the name. A popular name for moss-agate. 

MOOK-LBAD. A popular name for sphalerite, because it often 
resembles galenite, and is closely associated with it. 

MODUBnTE. J, Nieol, 1849. Nicol Min., 457, f. Modum, Norway, 
its locality. A syn. of skutterudite. 

Also used by A, Weisbaeh, 1875, Weis. Syn., 42 (Modumit). A var. 
of jarosite containing soda. 

MOFFRASITE. A, Leymerie, 1859, Ley. Min., ii, 283, after 

deMoffras, who first brought it to notice. An obs. syn. of bind- 
heimite. 

MOHSINE. E. J, Chapman, 1843, Chap. Min., 138, after Prof. 
F. Mohs, who had described it. An obs. syn. of lOllingite. 

MOHSITE. A, L&oy, 1827, Phil. Mag., 2d, i, 221, after Prof. F. 
Mohs, who had described it. A syn. of ilmenite. 

MOIjARTTE. J. C. Delametherie, 1C12. Delam. Min.. ii, 40, f. mola, 
'a mill,' on account of its use. An obs. name for buhrstone. 



MOZiDAWITB 179 MONETTTB 

MOLDAWTTB. A. Dufrenay, 1859, Duf. Min., iv, 50, f. Moldawa. 
Bohemia, its locality. An obs. syn. of obsidian. 

MOLISITE. VariaDt of molysite. 

MOLUTB. O, A, BerteU, [1804. Bert. Handb.. 1806], Moll Jahrb. 
Efera., ii, 439 (Mollit), after C. von Moll, who had described it. An 
obs. syu. of lazulitc. 

MOIiOOHTTB. See malachite. 

MOLTBDENA. See molybdenite. 

MOLTBDBNA QIjANOE. A syn. of molybdenite. 

MOLTBOBNTTB. P. J, Uielm, 1782, Vet. Ak. Stock., ix, 280 
<Mo1ybd»uH). f. ^oXvftSo^^ * lead,' the name at first given to substances 
contain ing lead and afterwards including graphite and molybdenite. 
M, Kirtoan uses molybdena, 1796, Eirw. Min., ii, 322, calling the 
metal molybdenite. A. Brongniart, 1807, Brong. Min., ii, 92, calls the 
sulphide molybdenite, quoting Kirwan. Sulphide of molybdenum, 
found in tabular crystals of a bluish-gray color. 

MOLTBDIO OOHRB. A syn. of molybdite. 

MOLTBDIO SILVBR. /. v. Born, 1790. Born Cat. Fob., ii, 419 
(Argent molybdique), f. its supposed composition. A syn. of wehrlite. 

MOLTBDINB. See molybdite. 

MOLTBDITB. B, P. Greg and W, O. Lettaom, 1854, Dana Min., 
144 (Molybdine), f. iU composition. A, Breithaupt, 1858, Berg. HQt., 
xvii. 125, used molybdite. Oxide of molybdenum, found in capillary 
incrustations, of a yellow color. 

MOLTBDOBCBNTTB. E, Bertrand, 1882, Bull. Soc. Min., v, 90, f. 
jidXvfidoi, 'lead,' and jmf^^f 'the moon' (instead of the more common 
{reXtfyTj, from which selenium is derived), alluding to its composition. 
Selenite of lead, found in fragile, white scales. 

MOLT8ITB. /. />. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 118, f. ^6Xv<Tli, <a 
stain/ because it stains the lava in which it occurs. Native ferric 
chloride, found at Vesuvius. 

MONAOITB. Variant of monazite. 

MONAZITB. a, BreWiaupt, 1829, Jour. Ch. Ph., Iv, 801 (Monazit), 
f. uoyd!^€ty, • to be solitary,* on account of its rarity. Phosphate of 
the cerium metals, found in small, reddish or brownish crystals. 

MONAZrrOID. B, Hermann, 1847, Jour. Pk. Ch., xl. 28, on 
account of its resemblance to monazite, with which it has been decided to 
be identical. 

MONBTTTB. C. U, &iepard, 1882, A. J. S., 8d, xxiii, 400. f. 
the Moneta Isl., West Indies, its locality. Hydrous add calcium phos- 
phate, found in small, yellowish-white crystals. 



MONHISIMITE 180 MORENOSITZr 

MONHEIMITB. A Kenngott, 1853, Kenng. Min., 28 (Monbeimit), 
after von Mouheim, who had described it. An obs. syn. of capuite, 

MONIMOIilTE. L, J. Igelstrom, 1865, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., xxii. 
227 (Monimolit), f. f^oviuoi, 'stable/ because it is decomposed with great 
difficulty, and XiBoi, Antimonate of lead and iron, sometimes contain- 
ing calcium, found in yellowish or brownish crystals. 

MONTTIS. C. U. Shepard, 1882. A. J. 8., 8d, xxiii. 400, f. the Mona 
Isl., West Indies, its locality. A syn. of collophanite. 

MONOPHANE. A. BreWiaupt, 1823, Breit Char., 279 (Monophan), 
probably f. uoyu(pdyffi, 'one visible,' because it has one very distinct 
and brilliant cleavage. An obs. syn. of epistilbite. 

MONRADITE. A. Erdmann, 1842, Vet. Ak. Stock., 108 (Monradit), 

after Monrad, an apothecary in Bergen, Norway, from whom it was- 

received. An altered pyroxene from Norway, of a yellowish color. 

MONROIilTE. B. Silliman, Jr., 1849, A. J. S., 2d, viii, 385, f. 
Monroe, N. Y., its locality, and A/GoS. A syn. of fibrolite. 

MONTANITE. F, A. Qenth, 1868, Dana Miu., 668, f. Montana,, 
because it was found there. Hydrous telluride of bismuth, found in 
yellowish, earthy incrustations. 

MONTEBRASITE. A, Des ClokeauK. 1871. C. K, Ixxiii, 806, f. 
Montebras, France, its locality. A var. of amblygonite. 

MONTIOELIJTE. H. J. Brooke, 1831. Phil. Mag., 2d, x. 265, Id 
honor of Prof. T. Monticelli. Silicate of magnesium, calcium and iron, 
belonging to the chrysolite group. 

MONTMARTRITE. J, C. Delametfierie, 1806, Jour, de Phys., Ixii, 
862, f. Montmartre, near Paris, its locality. A var. of gypsum, contain- 
ing calcium carbonate. 

MONTMORILLONITE. Mauduyt, 1847, Bull. Soc. Geol. Fr.. 

2d, iv, 168, f. Montmorillon, Frnuce, its locality. Silicate of aluminum^ 
found massive, clay-like and of a rose-red color. 

MONZONITB. F. v. Kohell, 1871, K. Ak. Mttnch. Ber., i, 162 
(Monzonit), f. Mt. Monzoui, Tyrol, its locality. A silicate of aluminum^ 
iron, calcium and sodium resembling green hornstone.' 

MOONSTONE. A popular name, alluding to the lustre, for some 
varieties of adularia and albite. The moonstone of the ancients wa» 
probably selenite. 

MORASS ORE. A syn. of bog-ore. 

MORDENTTE. H. How, 1864, Jour. Ch. Soc., xvii, 100, f. Morden, 
Nova Scotia, its locality. Hydrous silicate of aluminum, calcium and 
sodium resembling heulandite. 

MORENOSITE. A. Clares, [1851, Rev. Min., ii, 176], 1858, Berg. 



MORSSNBTITB 181 MOUNTAIN-BX7TTBR 

Hnt., xii. 37 (Morenosita), in honor of Moreno, of Spain. Hydrous 

sulphate of nickel, found in green, acicular crystals and crusts. 

MORBSNETITB. U. Risae, [1865, Nat. Ver. Rlieinl. Verh. , xxii. (2)» 
98], 1868, Kenng. Ueb. for 1862-65, 152 (Moresnetit), f. Moresnet, Belgium, 
a noted locality of zinc minerals. Avar, of calamine containing aluminum. 

MORINITB. A. Lacraix, 1891. Bull. Soc. Min., xiv, 187. after £. A. 
Morineau, from whom it was received. A fluo-phosphate of aluminum 
and sodium, not fully described. 

MORION. A popular name (used by lapidaries) from Pliny's mor- 
morion, 77, Pliny Hist., Bk. 37, 63. for very dark, smoky quartz. 

MORMORION. See morion. 

MORNrm. 71 Thomson, 11831, Bryce Tab ], 1832, Ed. New Phil. 
Jour., xiii, 88. f. Morne (now Mourne) Mts., Ireland, near which it was 
found. An obs. syn. of labradorite. 

MOROOOOHITB. M. F. HeddU, 1883, Encyc. Brit., xvi, 394, f. 
Morococha, Peru, its locality. A syn. of matildite. 

MORONOUTB. C. U. SJiepard, 1857, Shep. Min. Supp. . p. iv, f . 
Moapoy, 'the mulberry,' because of its resemblance to the mulberry cal- 
culus, and Ad9o$. A var. of jarosite. 

MOROXrrXJ. p. a AbUOgaard, [1798, Moll Jahrb., ii, 432], 1802, 
Reuss Min., ii, (2), 849 (Moroxit). probably f. morochites (morochthas), 
the name of a green gem, according to Hiny, 77, Pliny Hist., Bk. 87, 
68. An obs. syn. of apatite. 

MORVBNITZI. T. Thomson, 1836, Thom. Min., i, 851, f. Morven, 
Scotland , its locality. A syn. of harmotome. 

MOSANDRTTB. A. Erdmann. 1841, Berz. Jahres., xxi, 178 (Mo- 
aandrit), in honor of Prof. C. G. Mosander, of Stockholm. A silicate of 
the cerium metals, calcium and sodium, with titanium and fluorine. 

MOSS-AOATB. A popular name for a var. of agate containing 
moss-like forms. 

MOSSOTTTE. J. de Luca, 1858, Cimento, vii, 453, in honor of 
Prof. O. F. Mossoti, of Pisa. A var. of aragonite containing some car- 
bonate of strontium, and colored light green by copper. 

MOTTRABSITZI. H. E. Roseoe, 1876, Roy. Soc. Proc, xxv. 111, f. 
Mottram, St. Andrews. Cheshire, Eng., its locality. Vanadate of lead 
and copper, found in black, resinous incrustations. 

MOUNTAIN-BLUE. J. Q. WalUrius, 1747, Wall. Min.. 280 
(Ceeruleum montanum). An early name for certain blue copper min- 
erals, particularly azurite and chrysocolla. 

MOUNTAIN-BUTTER. A. O, Werner, 1789, Berg. Jour., i, 379 
(Bergbutter), alluding to its consistency. An obs. syn. of alunogen. 



MOUNTAIN-OORK 182 BSX7ROHISONITE 

MOUNT AIN-OORK. J. G, Wallenus, 1747, Wall. Min., 143 
(Bargkourk), f. its appearance. A cork-like var. of asbestos. 

MOUNT AIN-ORTSTAL. A popular Dame for quartz crystal. 

MOUNTAIN-aREEN. G. Agricola, 1546, Agric, 477 (Bcrggrttn), 
f. its color. A Dame at first applied to greeu copper ores in general, but 
later restricted to malachite aud chrysocolla. 

MOUNTAIN-LEATHER. An early popular name for a leather- 
like var. of asbestos. 

MOUNTAIN-MEAL. An early popular name for fiorite. 

MOUNTAIN-PAPER. A var. of asbestos, very similar to mountain- 
leather. 

MOUNTAIN-SOAP. A. O. Werner, 1780, Wern. Cronst., 189 
(Bergseife), alluding to its appearance and feeling. A kind of bole, later 
called oropion. 

MOUNTAIN-TALLOW. An early popular name for hatchettite. 

MOUNTAIN-WOOD. A popular name for a compact var. of 
asbestos, resembling wood. 

MOURNTTE. Variant of mornite. 

MOWENTTE. Error for morvenite. 

MUCKITE. J. f>, Sehroekinger, 1878, Geol. Reich. Verb., 887 
^Muckit), in honor of H. Muck, its discoverer. A yellow resin, found 
iu minute particles in certain coal beds in Moravia. 

MULDAN. A. BreithaupU 1866, Berg. HUt., zxv, 39, f. Mulda, 
Saxony, its locality. A var. of orthoclase. 

MULLERINE. F, 8. Beudant, 1882, Beud. Min., ii. 541. after 
F. J. Mailer von Reichenstein, the discoverer of tellurium. A telluride 
of gold and silver, probably identical with krennerite. 

MULLERTTE. Variant of mUllenue. 

Also used by R, W. E, Maclvor, 1887, Chem. News, Iv, 215, in honor 
of Baron F. von MdUer, of Victoria. An undescribed mineral from the 
Skipton caves. 

MULLER'S OLASS. An early popular name for hyalite, said to be 
derived from the name of its discoverer. 

MULLICITE. T. Thomson, 1836, Thom. Min., i, 462. f. MullicaHill, 
N. J., its locality. A syn. of vivianite. 

MUNDIC. A word of obscure origin used by Cornish miners, and 
applied by them to pyrites in general, but particularly to common, massive 
pyrite. 

MURCHISONITE. Wm, Phillips, 1827, Phil. Mag., 2d. i, 448. after 
Sir R. I. Murchison, who discovered it. A var. of orthoclase of flesh- 
rei color, resembling perthite. 



BffURIAOITB 188 NJESSUfiOTZI 

MORIAOITE. N. Poda v, Neuliaus, [1794, Fichtel's Mineralog. 
Aufsfttze. 228], 1795, Klap. Beit., i, 307 (Muriacit), because he thought it 
was a muriate of calcium. An obs. syn. of anhydrite. 

MURIOAIiOTTB. R. Kinmn, 1794. Kirw. Min.. i. 92 (Muricalcit), 
because a compound of magnesium and calcium, the former being called 
muriatic earth. An obs. syn of dolomite. 

MUROMONnTB. C. H. T, Kerndt, 1848, Jour Pk. Ch. , xliii, 228 
(Muromontit), f. Muromontia, the ancient name of Mauersberg, Saxony, 
its locality. A mineral closely related to allanite, but containing a 
larger proportion of the cerium metuls. 

MURSINSKITE. N, J d. KokscJiarov, 1886, Koks. Min., ix, 841 
(Mursinskit). f. Mursinska, Urul Mts., its locality. Yellow, crystalline 
inclusions in topaz, of unknown composition. 

MUSOOVIFB. /. D. Dana, 1850, Dana Min., 856, f. the old popu- 
lar name Muscovy glass, which was so called because in Russia it was 
used instead of glass. Common mica, a silicate of aluminum and po- 
tassium. 

MUSOOVY OIiASS. See muscovite. 

MUSENITB. A, Kenngoti, 1858, Kcnng. Min., 114 (^iQsenit), f. 
Milsen, Prussia, its locality. An obs. syn. of siegenite. 

MUSITE. L. MedidSpada, 1845, Ann. Ch. Pharm.. liii, 147(Musit), 
f . 3Iuso valley, Bogota, its locality. An obs. syn. of parisite. 

MUSSITE. B. Bonwnsin, 1806, Jour, de Phys., Ixii, 409. f. the Mussa 
Alp, Tyrol, its locality. An obs. syn. of diopside. 

Also used as a variant of musite: 

MUSSONlTfi. Error for mussite. 

MTBIilN. A. Breithaupt. 1841. Breit. Handb., ii. 858, f. uv4Xfyo?, 
* of marrow.' alluding to its appearance. A soft, yellowish or reddish- 
white, clay-like substance, identical with kaolin. 

MTSORIN. F, 8. Beudtint, 1882. Beud. Min., ii, 869, f. Mysore, 
India, its locality. An impure carbonate of copper. 

NAORINB. Variant of nacrite. 

NAORTTE. A. Brongniart, 1807, Brong. Min., i, 505, f. nacre, 
'mother of pearl.' in allusion to its lustre. A mineral occurring In 
jiearly scales, classed with muscovite. pholerite and kaolinite. 

Used also by T, T/iomson, 1886, Thom. Min., i, 244, for the green 
mica from Brunswick, Me. 

NADORITE. Flqjolot, 1870, C. R . Ixxi, 237. f . Djcbel Nador. 

Algiers, its locality. Chloro-antimonate of lead, occurring in tabular, 
orthorhombic crystals of a brown color. 

NmSUMTTB, a W. Blomstrand, 1868, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., xxv. 



NAQTAarrS 184 NATIVB IRIDIUM 

209 (Naesumit), f . Nflsum parish, Sweden, its locality. Hydrous silicate 
of aluminum and calcium, of cbalk-wliite color. 

NAQTAaiTE. W, Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 566 (Nagyagit), 
f. A. O. TTer;*^'* earlier name, 1789, Berg. Jour., i, 881, Nagiakererz, *ore 
from Nagyag,' Hungary, its locality. Telluride of lead, from its dark 
color often called black tellurium. 

NAIIi-HEAD SPAR. A popular name for calcite crystallized in 
flat rbombohedrons, given in allusion to the shape of the crystals, resem- 
bling the heads of wrought nails. 

NAMAQUALITE. A. H. Church, 1870. Jour. Ch. Soc., xxiii, 1, f. 
Namaqualaud, South Africa, its locality. Hydrate of copper and alumi- 
num, occurring in silky, blue fibres. 

NANTOEITB. Sieveking, 1867, Min. Chili App. 2, 51 (Nanto- 

quita), f. Nantoko, Chili, its locality. White, anhydrous, sub chloride 
of copper, which alters to atacamite on exposure to air. 

NANTOQUITE. Variant of nantokite. 

NAPAIiTTE. O. F. Becker, 1888, Geol. Surv. U. 8. Mon. 13, 372. f. 
Napa Co., Cal., its locality, and XiBo^. A yellowish hydrocarbon, of the 
consistency of shoemaker's wax. 

NAPHTHA. An early name, vd<pQa, used by Dioscorides, 50, 
Dioscor., i, 101, and by Pliny, 77, Pliny Hist., Bk. 2, 108, for the fluid 
hydrocarbons now going under the name of petroleum. 

NAPHTHADIL. A. Kenngott, 1852. Keung. Ueb.. for 1844-9, 254, 
a modification of neftcdegil, its native name. A syn. of neft-gil. 

NAPHTHAIJN. Mineral naphthalin has been detected in Rangoon 
tar. 

NAPOLTTH. H. J, Brooke, 1823, Brooke Cryst., 482, f. Naples, be- 
cause found near Vesuvius. A name given to hatlynite from Vesuvius, 
the result of an imperfect analysis. 

NASTURAN. F. v. Kobelh 1853, Kob. Min. Nam., 84, f. rcr?roJ, 
'compact,' and Uran, 'uranium,' because a massive uranium mineral. 
An obs. syn. of uraninite. 

NATIVE AMALGAM. See amalgam. 

NATIVE ANTIMONY. See antimony. 

NATIVE ARSENIC. See arsenic. 

NATIVE BISMUTH. See bismuth. 

NATIVE COKE. A var. of coal resembling artificial coke, but 
harder. 

NATIVE COPPER. See copper. 

NATIVE GOLD. See gold. 

NATIVE IRIDIUM. An early syn. of iridosmine. 



KATIVB IRON 185 NATROPHILITB 

NATIVB mON. See iron. 

KATIVB I<EA2>. See lead. 

NATIVB MBROURT. See mercury. 

NATIVB NICKBL. An early name for millerite. 

NATIVB PAI.IJLDIUM. See palladium. 

NATIVB SII«VBR. See silver. 

NATIVB SUU'HUR. See sulphur. 

NATIVB TELLURIUM. See tellurium. 

NATIVB TIN. See tin. 

NATRIEALITB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 69, f. natrium and 

kalium. A var. of balite contaiDing potassium. 

NATRTTB. A, WeUbach, 1875, Weis. Syn., 7 (Natrit). Asyn. of 
natron. 

NATROBOROOALOITB. Variant of boron atrocalcite. 

NATROBROMITB. C. U. Shepard, 1857, Shcp. Miu. Supp., p. vi, 
f. its composition. Bromide of sodium as found in brine springs. 

NATROOALOITB. Ifttinger, [1809, Moll.Jahrb., i, 455], 1810, 

Tasch. Min., iv, 210 (Natrocbalzit), because thought to be a lime-soda min- 
eral. An obs. syn. of datoliie. 

Also used by (7. 8. WeUs, 1839, Glock. Min., 673 (Natrocalcit), for the 
peeudomorpbs of ealcite, probubly after celestile, long thought to be after 
gay-lussite, and to contain soda. 

NATRODINB. C. U, Shepard. 1857, Shep. Min. Supp., p. vi, f. its 
composition. Iodide of sodium as found in brine springs. 

NATROLITB. M, U. Klaproth, [180J, Ges. Nat. Beri. N. Schrift., 
iv, 243], 1803, Jour. Nat. Hist., vi, 194, (Natrolith). f. natrium, from its com- 
position, and AtOoS. Hydrous silicate of aluminum and sodium, occur- 
ring usually in aggregations of aciculur, white crystals. 

Also used by W, H, WoUaston, 1813. Hofl. Min., ii, (1), 184. A syn. of 
ekebergite, or soda-scapolite. 

NATRON. From virpov, 'carbonate of soda.* The name is now 
restricted to carbonate of soda occurring in nature in solution; it has also 
been applied to the efflorescences resulting from evaporation, now called 
thermonatrite, and trona. 

NATRONTTB. Variant of natroiite. 

NATRONITRITB. A. Weisbach, 1875, Weis. Syn., 8 (Natron itrit). 
A syn. of soda nitre. 

NATROPHILITB. O, J, Brush and E. 8. Dana, 1890, A. J. S., 8d, 
xxzix, 205, f. natrium and <piXo^, 'a friend,' because it contains much 
sodium. Phosphate of manganese and sodium, of a deep yellow color 
and resinous lustre. 



NATROPHTTB 186 NELSONITB 

NATROPHTTB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 45, probably f. 

Datrium and phosphorus, from its composition. Hydrous phosphate of 
sodium. 

NATROSIDERITB. H. Stefens, [1824, Steff. Orykt. Supp., 699], 
1831, Glock. Min., 595 (Natrosiderit), f. natrium and aidr^po^, *iron,* 
from its composition. An obs. syn. of acmite. 

NATROXONOTIJTB. J. F. Williams, 1891. Geol. Surv. Ark. Kept, 
for 1890, ii, 358, because it is like xonotlite, but contains sodium. An 
altered wollastonite, near xonotlite. 

NAUMANNTTZI. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 565 (Nau- 
mannit), in honor of Prof. C. F. Naumann. Selenide of silver and lead, 
occurring massive and in splendent, black crystals. 

NEOROMTTE. Error for necronite. 

NBCRONITB. ff. H. Hayden, 1819, A. J. S.. i, 306, f. vcKpo^, * a 
corpse,' alluding to its odor. A cleiivable var. of orthoclase, which 
emits a fetid odor when broken. 

NECTUjITB. a L. Giesecke, 1832, Giesecke Cat., 32, probably f. 
vrfKTo^y 'swimming,* and Az9o?. It had been called quartz nectique by R. 
J. Hatty, 1801, Hatty Min., ii, 310. An obs. syn. of float-stone. 

NEEDLE-IRONSTONE. A. Breithaupi, 1823. Breit. Char., 95 (Na- 
deleisenerz), f. its structure and composition. The capillary var. of ' 
goethite. 

NEEDLE-ORB. F, Molts, 1804, Mobs Null, iii. 726 (Nadelerz), f. 
the acicular form of its crystals. A syn. of aikinite. 

NEEDLE-SPAR. T. Thomson, 1836, Thom. Min., i, 117, f. its 
structure. An obs. syn. of aragonite. 

NEEDLBSTONB. A. O. Werner, 1805, Jam. Min., ii, 599 (Nadel- 
stein), f. its structure. An obs. syn. of natrolite. 

NEEDLE-ZEOLITE. A, O. Werner, 1812, Hoff. Min., ii, (1), 235 
(Nadelzeolith), because a zeolite found in needle-shaped crystals. An 
obs. syn. of natrolite. 

NEFBDIBFFITB P. Pusirewsky, [1872, Min. Ges. St. Pet. Verb., 
vii, 15], 1873, Jahrb. Min., 423 (Nefediewit). A doubtful silicate of 
aluminum and magnesium, of white to red color. 

NBFTDBQIL. See neftgil. 

NBFTGIL. C. J. Fritzsche, 1858, Jour. Pk. Ch., Ixxiii, 321, f. Nef te- 
degil, the native name. Also called Neftdegil by /?. Hermann, I.e., 220 
A mixture of hydrocarbons found with the naphtha of the Caspian sea 
region. 

NELSONITB. 8. Meunier, 1893, Meun. Fers Met., 22, f. Nelson 
Co., Ky., where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 



NBBCAUTB 187 NEPHRTTS 

NBMALITB. T. NuUall, 1822, A. J. S., iv, 19, f. rifMcc, 'a thread/ 
in allusion to its structure, and Xt^o^, A fibrous var. of brucite. 

NBOOHRTSOUTE. A. Seaeehh 1876, Nap. Ac. Reud., X7, 209, f. 
y^oij ' new,' aud chrysolite, because recently formed. A var. of chryso- 
lite contaiuing much mangauese, near hortonolite. 

NBOOTESE. F. 8. Beudant, 1882, Beud. Min., ii, 607, f. vioi, 
'new,* and Ktrjaii, 'acquisition.' An obs. syn. of scorodite. 

NEOOYANTTE. A, Bcacchi, 1882, Nap. Ac. Atti, ix, 5 (Neociano), 
f. rioi, 'new,' aud Kvavoi, 'blue,' from its recent formation and its 
color. An uncertain blue mineral, found in minute, tabular crystals, 
formed by sublimation in the fumeroles of Vesuvius. 

NEOUTE. Th. SeJiMrer, 1847, Pogg. Ann., "ixxi, 285 (Neolith), f. 
reoi, ' new,' because recently formed, and Xffjoi. Hydrous silicate of 
aluminum and magnesium, found in green, silky fibres. 

NEOPLASE. F. 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., 488. f. r^oi, 'new,' 
and nX&aii, 'formation,' because a decomposition product. An obs. 
syn. of botryogen. 

NEOTESITE. L, J, IgeUProm, 1890. Jahrb. Min.. i, 257 (Neotesit), 
f. reorifatoif 'young,' because it is of later formation than other manga- 
nese silicates. Hydrous silicate of manganese, in color resembling red 
orthoclase. 

NEOTOOITB. If. Nordemkidld, 1849, Nord. Atom. Ch. Min. Syst., 
140 (Neotokit), f. reSroKoi, 'new-born,' alluding to its recent origin. 
A black, amorphous, hydrous silicate of manganese and iron, a result of 
the alteration of rhodonite. 

NEOTTPB. A, Breilhaupt, 1841, Breit. Handb., ii, 818 (Neotyp), f. 
y4o%, ' new,' and ri5;ro5, 'type,' because differing from any variety of cal- 
otte previously found. A var. of calcite, containing barium, called also 
baricalcite. 

NEPAUUTE. H, Piddington, 1854, Soc. Beng. Jour., xxiii, 170, f. 
Nepdl, India, where it was found. Announced as a carbonate of bis- 
muth, copper and other bases, but proved to be simply tetrahedrite. 

NEPHALITE. Probably an error for nephatil. 

NEPHATIL. One of the variants of neft-gil. 

NEPHEUNE. See nephelite. 

NEPHEUTE. R, J, Hduy, 1800, Jour, de Phys., Ii, 459 (N6phe- 
line), f. v€<p€Xrj, 'a cloud,' because it becomes cloudy when immersed in 
strong acid. Silicate of aluminum and sodium, first found at Vesuviii;^ 
in glassy crystals. 

NEPHOUTE. Error for nipholite. 

I. A, G. Werner, 1780, Wern. Cronst., 185 (Nephrit). f. 



NBPTUNZTB 188 NIOOOOHROMITB 

its old name. Lapis nephriticus, ' kidoey-stone/ because used as a remedy 
for disease of the kidney. A very tougb, compact var. of tremolite, of 
grayish or greenish color, used for caryed ornaments and weapons, and 
often called jade. 

Compact zoisite was also included under this name, and perhaps other 
minerals. 

NBPTUNITB. G. Flink, 1803. Geol. FOr. FRrh., xv, 196 (Neptunit), 
after Neptune, the god of the sea. Silico-titanate of iron, manganese, 
potassium and sodium. 

NBRTSOHINSEm]. O. «. Bagaumoffski, 1884. Isis, (1), 14 (Nerts- 
chinskit), f . Nertschinsk, Ural, its locality. A bluish-white clay, closely 
allied to lenzlnite. 

NESQUEHONTTXI. F, A. Genth and 8, L. Pmfield, 1890, A. J. S.. 
8d, xxxix, 121, f. Nesquehoning, Pa., its locality. Hydrous carbonate 
of magnesium, found in colorless or white, radiating crystals. 

NEUDORFITE. J. v, Schroekinger, 1878, Geol Reich. Verb., 887 
(Neudorfit), f. Neudorf, Moravia, its locality. A pale-yellow, waxy 
jesin. 

NEUKIROHITB. Variant of newkirkite. 

KEUROLITE. T. Tliomson, 1886, Thom. Min., i, 864, f. revpov, 
"*& tendon,' in allusion to its fibrous structure, and \iBoi, A pinite-like 
mineral of a wax-yellow color, occurring in a large belt at Staustead, 
Quebec. 

NEVTANSEITZ]. Variant of newjanskite. 

NEWBERTITE. O. wm Bath, 1879. Nied. Ges. Bonn, xxxvi, 5 
(Newberyit), after J. C. Newbery. its discoverer. Hydrous phosphate 
of magnesium, occurring in guano in large, tabular crystals. 

NEWBOLDITE. H. Piddington, 1847, Soc. Beng. Jour., xvi, (2), 
1129, after Capt. T. J Newbold, who discovered it. An uncertain 
mineral, probably a ferruginous sphalerite. 

NEWJANSKITE. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 558 (New- 
janskit). f. Newjansk, Siberia, its locality. The var. of iridosmine 
containing forty per cent or more of iridium. 

NEWKIRKITE. T. Thomson, 1836, Thom. Min., i, 509, f. Keu- 
Idrchen, Alsace, its locality. An obs. syn. of manganite. 

NEWPORTTTE. /. G, Totten, 1852, Shep. Min., 161, f. Newport. 
R. I., its locality. A syn. of ottrelite. 

NEWTONITE. i?. N, Brackeit and J, F. Williams, 1891, A. J. 8., 
3d, xlii. 18, f. Newton Co., Ark., its locality. Hydrous silicate of alu- 
minum, resembling kaolin. 

NIOCOOHROMITE. C, U. Shepard, 1877, Shep. Cont. Min., 6, f. 



NIOOOXJTB 189 NIOBITB 

its supposed composition. A yellow coating on zaratite, supposed to be 
dicbroDiate of nickel. 

NIOOOLTTB. /. 2>. Dana, 1868, Dana Min.. 60. f. niccolum, 

* nickel/ from its composition. Earlier called nickeline by F. 8. Beudant, 
1882, Bead. Min., ii, 586. Arsenide of nickel, from its copper color 
commonly called copper-nickel. 

NIOKBL-BIiOOM. J. R L, Haumann, 1818, Haus. Min.. iii, 
1129 (Nickel blatbe), f. its composition and appearance. A syn. of 
annabergite. 

NIOKBIrOLANOB. 0, H. Pfaff, 1818, Jour. Ch. Pb.. xzii. 260 
(Nickelglanz), f. its composition and lustre. A syn. of gersdorfflte. 

NIOKBIrOREEN. A, BreiihaupU 1828. Breit. Cbar., 165 (Nikel- 
grdn), f. its composition and color. An obs. syn. of annabergite. 

NIOKBL QYBftNITE. F, A, Qenih, [1851. Eell. Tied., iii, 487], 1854, 
Dana Min., 286 (Nickel-Gymnit). because a gymniie in wbicb part of tbe 
magnesium is replaced by nickel. A syn. of gentliite. 

NIOKBUNB. See niccolite. 

NIOEEIilTE. Variant of nickeline. 

NIOEEIrOOHRXl. A. Cronaiedt, 1758, Crons. Min., 262 (Ocbrn- 
niccoli). f. its appearance and composition. An eurly name for anna- 
bergite. 

NIGKEL-SKUTTBRUDITE. A. J. Moses and E. Waller, 1892, 8. 
M. Quar., ziv, 61, because a mineral of tbe skutterudite type, containing 
nickel. Arsenide of nickel and cobalt, of gray color and granular struc- 
ture. 

NIOKBL-STIBINE. C. U, Shepard, 1885, Sbep. Min., (2),ii, 88, f. 
its composition. An obs. syn. of ullmannite. 

NIOKBL VITRIOL. A. Cronstedt, 1758. Crons. Min., 188 (Nickel- 
Titriol), f. its composition. An obs. syn. of morenosite. 

NIOOMELANB. Adam, 1869. Adam Tab., 78, f. nickel and 

/i^Xdi, 'dvoi, ' black,' from its color and composition. A very doubtful 
nickel oxide. 

NIOOPTRTTB. 0, U, Shepard, 1857. Sbep. Min., 807, because it is 
a Tar. of pyrites containing nickel. An obs. syn. of pentlandite. 

NIORBSCnnrB. F. Homstein, 1867, Zt. Geol., xix, 842 (Nigrescit), f. 
nigrescere, 'to turn black,' because tbougb green wben fresh, it turns 
black on exposure. Hydrous silicate of iron and magnesium. 

NIORINB. 2>. L, O. Karsten, 1800. Karst. Tab., 56 (Nigrin). f. niger. 

* black,' in allusion to its color. Tbe black, ferriferous var. of rutile. 

NIOBTTE. W. ffaidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 549 (Niobit), be- 
cause it contains niobium (columbium). An obs. syn. of columbite. 



NIPHOLmi 190 NONTRONTTB 

NIPHOIiITB. C. F. Naumann, 1864, Naum. Min.. 219 (Nipholith), 
f. vi4>6', (in composition) 'snow,' and At'Go?, because of its similarity to 
to cliiolite. A syn. of chodneffite. 

NITRAMMITE. C. U. SJiepard, 1857, Shep. Min. Supp.. p. v, f. ite 
composition. Nitrate of ammonium, found native in a nitre cave in 
Tennessee. 

NITRATINE. W, Haidinger, 1846, Haid. Handb., 488 (Nitratin), f. 
nitre. A syu. of soda-nitre. 

NITRIj. From vizftov, * carbonate of sodium.' Native nitrate of 
potassium. 

NITROBARITE. H. G. LewiSy 1882, Am. Nat., xvi, 78, f. its com- 
position. Barium nitrate found as a mineral. 

NITROCALOITE. C, U. Shepard, 1835, Shep. Min., (2), ii, 84, f. its 
composition. Nitrate of calcium found as a mineral. 

NITROOLAUBERITE. SchwarUemberg, 1871, Min. Chili 

App. 3, 46, because it contains nitrate of sodium (nitre), and sulphate of 
sodium (Glauber's salt). A while, fibrous, crystalline salt from Chili. 

NITROMAQNESITE. C. U. Shepard, 1835, Shep. Min., (2), ii, 86, 
f. its composition. Native nitrate of magnesium, said to occur in cavea 
with nitfocalcite, its existence not positively proved. 

NIVBITB. L. Darapsky, 1890, Jahrb. Min., i, 62 (Niveit), f. niveus, 
' snowy,' in allusion to its color. Cue of several names proposed as sub- 
stitutes for copiapite and coquimbite. 

NIVBNITB. W. E. Hidden and /. B, Mackintosh, 1889, A. J. S.. 8d, 
xxxviii, 481, after Wm. Niven/its discoverer. A var. of uraninite, con- 
taining oxide of uranium in larger proportions than is found in other 
varieties. 

NOBILTTB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 85, perhaps f. nobilis, 

'noble,' for it was earlier called 'Edler Molybdftnglanz.' An obscure 
mineral near nagyagite. 

NOOBRITB. A. Scacchi, 1881, Ace. Line. Atti, v, 270 (Nocerina), 
f. Nocera, Italy, its locality. Oxyfluoride of calcium and magnesium, 
found in white, acicular crystals, in volcanic bombs. 

NOHLITB. A. E. Nordenskiold, 1872. Geol. F5r. FOrh., i, 8(Nohlit), 
f. Nohl, Sweden, its locality. A columbate of uranium and the yttrium 
metals, near samarskite. 

NOLASOITB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab. , 56, probably f . the 

San-Pedro-Nolasco mines, Chili. A var. of galenite containing arsenic. 

NONTRONITB. P. Berihier, 1827, Ann. Ch. Phys., xxxvi, 22, f. 
Nontron, France, its locality. A yellow or pale greenish, unctuous var. 
of chloropal. 



NORAIilTB 191 NUTTAZiITB 

NORAXJTB. J, 2>. Dana, 1868. Dana Mio., 286, f. Nora, West- 
maDDland, its locality, and AtOoS. An aluminum-iron-lime var. of 
ampbibole. 

NORDBNSmOLDINB. W. C, Brogger, 1887, Geol. FOr. FOrh., ix. 
265 (NordenskiOldin), in honor of Baron A. E. NordenskiOld. Borate of 
calcium and tin, found in yellow, tabular crystals. 

NORDBNamOLDrm. a, Kenngott, 1854, K. Ak. Wien., xU, 513 
(NordenskiOldit), in honor of Prof. N. NordenskiOld. An obs. syn. of 
tremolite. 

NORDBfARKITB. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 889, f. Nordmark, 
Sweden, its locality. An easily fusible .var. of staurolite, containing 
manganese. 

NORMAUN. A, Breiihaupt, 1827, Jour. Ch. Ph., 1, 827. No do- 
rivation given. An obs. syn. of philllpsite. 

NORTHUPITB. W, M. Fooie, 1895, A, J. 8.. 8d, 1, 480, after 0, 
H. Northup, who discovered it. Chloride and carbonate of sodium and 
magnesium, found in regular octahedrons. 

NOSBAN. VaHant of nosite. 

NOSBLTTB. See nosite. 

NOSIAN. See nosite. 

N08IN. Variant of nosite 

N08ITB. Jf. H. Klaproth, 1815. Elap. Beit., vl, 871 (Nosian), after 
K. W. Nose, who had described it. The form noselite is suggested by ff. 
H, A. Franeke, 1890, Frunck. Min. Nom., 53 (Nose^ith). A silicate of 
aluminum and sodium, containing also sulphur tri-oxide, occurring in 
grayish, bluish or brownish crystals. 

NOTTTB. W. 8. r, Waliershausen, 1858, Walt. VuL, 229(Notit), f. 

Val di Noto, Sicily, its locality. A var. of palagonite, now considered a 

rock. 

NOUBffBAITB. Variant of noumeite. This form is preferred by 

the author. 

NOUBABITB. A, Liveriidge, 1874, Sidney Morning Herald, Sept. 
29, f. Noumea, New Caledonia, where it was found. A dark green, 
unctuous var. of gamierite. 

NUBSBTTB. Variant of noumeite. 

NnSSIBRITB. /. DarHiautr, 1886, Ann. Ch. Phys., Ixii, 217, f. 
Nussiere. France, its locality. An impure, yellowish-green or grayish 
var. of pyromorphite. 

NUTTAUTB. H. J, Brooke, 1824, Ann. Phil., 2d, vii, 866, after T. 
Kuttall, who brought it to England. A white or smoky-brown var. of 
acapolite from Bolton, Mass. 



OBSIDIAN 192 OQOOTTB 

OBSIDIAN. Pliny, 77, Pliny Hist., Bk. 86, 67 (Obsianus), f. Obsius, 
who is said to have discovered it in Ethiopia. A black volcanic glass, 
consisting mostly of orthoclase. 

OOOIDBNTAL AMBTHYST. See oriental amethyst. 

OOHRAN. A. Bretihaupt, 1882, Breit. Char., 100, f. tozpoc, 'ochre.' 
An unctuous, ochreous clay, from Hungary. 

OOHRB. A general name for red, brown or yellow oxides of iron, 
used as pigments. 

OOHROITE. M. H. Klaproth, 1804, All. Jour. Chem., ii, 808 
(Ochroit), f. ooxftcii * ochre,' on account of the yellow-brown color of the 
earth derived from it. An obs. syn. of cerite. 

OOHROLTTE. G. Flink, 1889, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., xlvi, 6 (Ochro- 
lith), f. GoxpoS, 'yellow,' alluding to its color, and XtBoS. Cloro-antimo- 
nite of lead, found in small, tabular crystals of a sulphur-yellow color. 

OCEENITE. See okenite. 

OOTAHBDRITB. H. B. de 8au$sure, 1796, Saus. Alp., vii, § 1901 
(Octaedrite), in allusion to the shape of its crystals. Titanic acid, 
occurring in acute octahedrons of a brownish color. 

OCTIBBBHITE. Variant of oktibbehite. 

ODERITE. Probably an error for odinite. 

ODINTTE. Probably a variant of odite. 

ODITB. A. Dttfrenoy, 1847, Duf. Min., iii, 772, after the Scandhuu 
vian god Odin, since the mineral came from Sweden. Muscoyite, found 
in broad plates of a yellowish-brown color. 

ODONTOUTB. 6^. Fischer v. Waldheim, 1806, Soc. Nat. Mosc. 
Mem., i, 140, f. 68ov^, oddvro?, 'a tooth,' referring to its origin, and 
XBo^. Fossil bones or teeth colored blue by phosphate of iron» 
called occidental turquoise, and bone-turquoise. 

(BDEIiITB. Variant of sedelite. 

(BliLAOHBRTTB. /. 2>. Dana, 1867, A. J. S., 2d, xliv, 256, after 
J. (Ellacher, who analyzed it. A hydrous mica containing barium, 
occurring in white scales. 

(BRSTBDITB. J. O. Forchhammer, 1885, Fogg. Ann., xxxy., 680 
(CErstedit), in honor of H. C. CErsted. A reddish-brown var. 6f zircon, 
altered by hydration. 

OFFRETITB. F, Oonnard, 1890, C. R., cxi, 1002, in honor of 
Prof. A Off ret, of Lyons. Hydrous silicate of aluminum and potassium, 
found in minute, colorless or white, hexagonal prisms. 

OOOOrFB. A, BreithaupU 1840, Breit. Handb., 888 (Ogkoit), f. 
oyKo%, * a roll (of hair),' in allusion to the form of an aggregation of ita 
crystals. An obs. syn. of prochlorite. 



198 ouvmB 

OISANTTB. /. a DelametheHe, 1705. Delam. T. T., i, 401, f. OUan, 
France, where it was found. A syn. of octahedrite. 

Also used by M. H. Klaproth, 1797, Elap. Beit, ii, 118 (OisanniQ. 
An obs. syn. of axinite. 

OKBNITB. F. «. KobeU, 1828, Arcb. Ges. Nat., xiv, 888 (Ockenit), 
in honor of Prof. L. Ockeu, of Munich. Changed to okenite by v. Kobell. 
1880, Kob. Char., i, 188. A hydrous silicate of calcium, occurriug lu 
fibrous masses of white or bluish-white color. 

OKTIBBEHITXI. 0. U. Sfiepard. 1867, A. J. 8.. 2d, xliii, 28, f. 
Oktibbeha Co., Miss., where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 

OLAFITB. Th. Sefmrer, 1866, Berg. HQt., xxv, 88 (Olatit). prob- 
ably after St. Olaf, King of Norway. An obs. name for the so-called 
oligoclase-albite from Suarum, Norway. 

OTiDHAMITB. Jf. 8. Maskslffne, 1870, Phil. Trans., 195, in honor 
of Dr. T. Oldham, of the Indian Geol. Survey. Calcium sulphide, 
found in small, pale-brown spherules in a meteorite. 

OUOISTB. B. J. Ea&y, 1801, HaUy Min., !▼, 27 (Fer oligiste). f. 
oXiyiaroit * the least,' because it contains less iron than magnetite. An 
obs. syn. of hematite. 

OUOOOUkSB. A. BreOhaupt, 1826. Pogg. Ann., Tiii, 288 (Oligo- 
klas), f. oXtyoi, 'little,' and kXccv, 'to break,' because thought to have a 
less perfect cleavage than albite. Soda-lime feldspar, found in vitreous, 
white or reddish- white crystals, or massive. 

OUaOOLASB-AIiBITB. Th. Scheerer, 1868, Pogg. Ann., Ixxxix, 
17 (Oligoklas- Albit). A var. of albite, containing, as oligoclase does, less 
than ten per cent of soda. 

OlilQOOUkSITB. Variant of oligoclase. 

OUaONITB. /. F. L. Hautmann, 1847, Haus. Min., ii, 1862 (Oli- 
gooit), f. A, Breiihaupf» earlier name Oligonspath, 1841, Breit. Handb., U, 
285, f. oXtyoi, 'small,' because it has a lower specific gravity than normal 
dderite. A var. of siderite, containing much carbonate of manganese. 

OUGON-SPAR. See oligonite. 

OZiIVB OOPPBR ORB. B. KirtDan, 1796, Eirw. Min., ii, 151, 
from Olivenerz. See olivenite. 

OIJVBNITB. B. Jameion, 1820, Jam. Min., ii, 885, f. A. O. Wemer*i 
Olivenerz, 1789, Berg. Jour., i, 882, in allusion to Its olive-green color. 
Hydrous arsenate of copper, occurring in lustrous olive-green or yellow 
crystals, and in globular and reniform masses. 

OZJVINB. A. O. Werner, 1790, Berg. Jour., ii, 55 (Olivin). alluding 
to its olive-green color. A yellowish-green var. of chrysolite, usually 
found in grains in volcanic rocks. 



OLIVINOID 194 OPAOITB 

OLIVINOID. a U. Shepard, 1848, A. J. S.. 2d, vi, 403. A var. 
of chrysolite (olivine), found in meteorites, and said to differ materially 
from ordinary olivine. 

OLIjARIS. See potstoDe. 

OLLmi. K W, Bristow, 1861. Brist. Gloss., 265, f. pierre ollaire, 
an early name. A syu. of potstone. 

OLTNTHOUTB. O. Fischer v. WaWieim, 1811, Onomast. du Syst. 
d'Oryct., 10 (Olyntholith), f. oXvvboi, *an unripe fig,' in allusion to its 
color, and Xi^oS, An obs. syn. of grossularite. 

OMPHAOrm. A. O. Werner, 1815, Hoff. Min., ii, (2), 802(Ompha- 
zit), f. ojiKp r^, -aKoi, ' an unripe grape,' in allusion to its color. A var. 
of pyroxene, colored grass-green by chromium. 

ONOOITB. y ariau t o f ogcoite. 

ONOOPHTLLITZI. F. v. Sandberger, 1888, E. Ak. Manch. Ber., 
xviii, 480 (Onkophyllit), f. oyKoS, * swollen, fat,' hnd (pvXXov, 'a leaf,' 
because it is a mica which feels greasy. A compact mica similar to on- 
cosine, resulting from the alteration of feldspar. 

ONOOSINB. F V. Kobell, 1834, Jour. Pk. Ch., ii, 295 (Onkosin), f. 
o/KoaiS, 'intumescence,' because it swells up when heated before the 
blowpipe A compact muscovite, produced by alteration, formerly re- 
ferred to piuite. 

ONBOITB. *C. 0. Andre, [1802, BrUnner Tageblatt, No. 18], 1806, 
Moll Jubrb. Efem., ii, 109 (Onegit), f. Lake Onega, Russia, its locality. 
An obs. syn. of goethite. 

ONOFRTTB. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 565 (Onofrit). f. 
San Onofre, Mexico, its locality. Sulpho-selenide of mercury, found in 
black masses with a metallic lustre. 

ONTARIOLTTB. C. U. Shepard, 1880, A. J. 8., 3d. xx, 54. f. the 
Prov. of Ontario, where it was found. A doubtful var. of scapolite, 
found in black or gray, prismatic crystals. 

ONTZ. From ovv^, 'a nail or claw.* A var. of quartz, occurring 
in distinct layers, white and dark, from which cameos are often cut. 

ONTZ-MARBLB. A stalagmidc calcite, showing a banded structure 
like onyx; often named from the place where it is found, as Mexican onyx. 

OOLITB. From ooov, * an egg/ because it looks like fish -roe, and 
Xi^o^. A granular limestone made up of small, rounded concretions. 

OOSITB. CMarx, 1834, Jour. Pk. Ch.. iii, 216(05sit), f. the 05s val- 
ley, Baden, its locality. A pinite-like mineral resembling oncosine. 

OPAOITB. H. Vogelsang, 1872, Zt. Geol., xxiv. 530 (Opacit), f. 
opacuB, 'opaque.' The name given to certain black, opaque grains 
found in rocks, not identified with any minoral. 



OPAL 195 ORTHITB 

OPAIj. From opalus, the aDcient name of the gem. Amorphous 
silica, containing a small percentage of water. 

OPAIf-AOATB. Opal, with an agate-like structure, showing bauds 
of diHereut colors. 

OPAI.-AI1I.OPHANZI. A, Sehrdtter, [1887, Zt. Phys., 2d, iv, 145], 
1841, Glock. Jahres. for 1837, 575 (Opalin-Allophau), because it resembles 
both opal and allophan. An obs. syn. of schrOtterite. 

OPAUTB. Variant of opal. 

OPAL-JASPBR. F. A. Reu^, 1801, Rcuss Min., (2), i, 817 (Opal- 
jaspis). Common opal with the color of yellow jasper. 

OPHITB. Pliny, 71, Pliny Hist., Bk. 86. 11 (Ophites), f. o>/rv5, 
Mike a serpent,' alluding to its peculiar markings. An obs. syn. of 
flerpentine. 

OP8IM08B. F. 8. Beudant, 1882, Beud. Min.. ii, 187, f. o^/>og, 

'late,' because tardily adopted as a species. An obs. syn. of klip- 
steinite. 

ORAMOITB. 0, Bergemann, 1851, Pogg. Ann., Uxzii, 580 (Orangit), 
f. its color. A bright, orange-yellow var. of thorite. 

ORAVrrZITB. A, Breithaupt, 1841 . Breit. Handb. , ii, 866 (Orevizit), 
f. Oravitz (Oravicza), Hungary, its locality. A greenish- white clay, con- 
taining oxide of zinc. 

ORIOHALOTTB. E, F, Oloeker, 1847, Glock. Syn.. 280(OHclia1cit), 
f. orichalcum, ' yellow copper ore ' (brass ore). A variant of aurichalcite. 

ORIBNTAL AMBTUYST. An early name for amethyst-colored 
eorundum. The same prefix is used with emerald, hyacinth, ruby, sapph- 
ire and topaz, meaning corundum having the colors of these various 
gems. The term occidental is used for inferior gems of the same colors. 

ORIOBRFVITB. A. Dufrenay, 1859, Duf. Min , iv, 849 (Origerw- 
flte), f. Origerfva, Finhind, its locality. A syn. of gilliugite. 

O'RU.BTITB. D, Waldie, 1870, Soc. Beng. Proc, 279, after 
£. O'Riley, from whom it was received. A steel-gray mineral from 
Burmah, very similar to domeykite. 

ORNrTHITB. A. A Julien, 1865, A. J. 8 , 2d, xl, 877, f. oprt^, 
•i6o?, ' a bird,' because It occurs in guaoo. A var. of metabrushite, the 
result of alteration. 

OROPION. B, F, Olocker, 1847. Glock. Syn.. 188. f. 5po?, 'moun- 
tain,' and jrioK. ' fat,' because of the older name, mountain- soap, of which 
it b ao obs. syn. 

ORPZMBNT. From auripigmentum. 'gold paint,' alluding Co Its 
common use. Suphide of arsenic, a well-known gold-yellow pigment. 

ORTHITB. /. /. Berulius, 1817, Ann. Phil., iz. 160, f. ofiSdi, 



ORTHOOUkSB 196 OTTREUTB 

' straight/ alluding to the extension in length of its crystals. A var. of 
allanite, generally containing a little water. 

ORTHOOLASB. A. Breithaupt, 1823, Breit. Char., 274(Orthoklas), 
f. (J/jGJ5. * right,' and kXccv, 'to break,* because its two principal cleav- 
ages are ut right angles M> each other. An important member of. the 
feldspar group, often called potash feldspar. 

ORTHOOIiASim. Variant of orthoclase. 

ORTHOSB. R. J. Hauy, 1801, Hatty Min., ii, 488, f. of^oi, 'right/ 
because its two principal cleavages are at right angles to each other. A 
name for the whole feldspar family before it was divided into separate 
species. 

ORTZTTB. Q. Grattarola, 1879. Soc. Tosc. Atti, iv, 226 (Orizite), f. 
opv!^a, ' rice.' in allusion to the shape of its crystals. Hydrous silicate 
of aluminam and calcium, found in minute, white crystals, looking like 
grains of rice 

OSBORNTTB. N. 8. Maskelyne, 1870, Phil. Trans., 198, after 
George Osborne, who sent to London the specimen In which it was discov- 
ered. A meteoric mineral, near oldhamite. 

OSBRSKITB. A. Breithaupt, 1858, Berg. HQt. , xvii, 64 (Oserskit), 
in honor of Gen. Alex, von Oserski. An obs. syn. of aragonite. 

OSMBLITB. A, Breithaupt, 1827, Pogg. Ann., iz, 183 (Osmelith), 
f. 6<TH7f, 'odor,* because it gives a decided odor when breathed on, and 
A^oS. An obs. syn. of pectolite. 

OSBSIRIDIUM. See iridosmine. 

OSTBOOOLLA. C. Qemer, [1565, Ges. Foss., 31], 1868, Dana Min.» 
680 (Osteocollus), f. oareov, 'bone.* and KoXXd, 'glue,' because it was 
formerly supposed to have the property of uniting broken bones. A cellu- 
lar, calcareous tufa, formed as an incrustation on reeds and other plants. 

OSTBOLITB. J, C, Bromeis, 1851, Ann. Ch. Pharm., Ixxix, 1 
(Osteolith), f. oarreov, 'bone.' because it is phosphate of calcium similar 
to bone phosphate, and XiQoi. Compact, earthy apatite, more or less 
altered, resembling lithographic stone. 

OSTRANTTB. A. Breithaupt, 1827, Ed. New Phil. Jour., iv, 186, 
after Ostra, the Scandinavian goddess of spring, perhaps because found in 
Norway. A var. of zircon more or less changed by alteration. 

OSTRBOOOLLA. Error for osteocolla. 

OTRBLITB. See ottrelite. 

OTTRBLITB. Wolff (ot Spa). [1812, Moll Neue Jahrb., ii, (3), 

379], 1814. Ullm. Tab., 459 (Otrelite). f. Otrez (Ottrez), Belgium, its local- 
ity, and Ai9oS. An obs. syn. of diallage. 

Also used by A, Dei CUnzeaux and A. Damaur, 1842, Ann. des M.» 



OUATITB 197 PAZJBONATROUTB 

4th, ii, 857, for a hydrous silicate of alumiDum, iron and manganese, found 
in gniyisli to black, crystalline scales. 

OUATITB. J, J. N. Huot, 1841, Huot Min., i, 241, f. ouate, 
' wadding,* a translation of its English name. An obs. syn. of wad. 

OURAUTS. Variant of uralite, from the older spelling Oural. 

OUVAROVrrZI. Variant of uvarovite. 

OWHNrm. F. A. Qenth, 1858, A J. 8.. 2d, xvi, 169, in honor of 
Prof. D. D. Owen. A syn. of thuringite. 

OXAOALOmi. a U. Shepard, 1844, Sbep. Min., (1), 111, because 
it is an oxalate of calcium. An obs. syn. of whewellite. 

OXAHVBRITB. See oxbaverite. 

OXAUTE. A, Breithaupt, 1823. Breit. Char., 252 (Oxalit), because 
it contains oxalic acid. An obs. syn. of humboldtine. 

OXAMMTTB. C, U. Shepard, 1870, Rural Car., i, 471, f. iU compo- 
sition. Oxalate of ammonium, found in yellowish- white crystals or 
crystalline grains. 

OZHAVBRITB. 2>. Breujiier, 1827. Ed. Phil. Jour., vii, 115 
(Oxahverite), f. Oxahver or Oxhaver, Iceland, its locality. An obs. syn. 
of apophyllite. 

OZARKITB. a U. Shepard, 1846, A. J. 8., 2d, ii, 251, f. the Ozark 
Mta., Ark., where It was found. A white, massive var. of thomsonite. 

OZOOBRITB. B. F. Qloeker, 1888, Jour. Ch. Ph., Ixix, 215 (Ozo- 
kerit). f. oZetv, 'to smell,' and Krfp6%t 'wax,' in allusion to its odor and 
appearance. A dark colored hydrocarbon, consisting of higher members 
of the paraffin series. 

PAOHNOUTB. A. Kn4fp, 1868. Ann. Ch. Pharm., czxvii. 61 
(Ptechuolit), f. ndxyrf* 'frost,' in allusion to its appearance, and XBoi, 
Hydrous fluoride of aluminum, calcium and sodium, occurring in small, 
white crystals on cryolite. 

PAOTTB. A, Breithaupt, 1866, Berg. Hat., xxv, 167 (Pazit), f. La 
Paz, Bolivia, its locality. Arsenical sulphide of iron, near arsenopyrite. 

PAaODITB. C, A, Q, Napione, 1798, Jour, de Phys., xlvii, 220, 
because it is the stone from which miniature pagodas were carved. An 
obs. syn. of agalmatolite. 

FAINTBRTTB. W. W, JefferU, 1891, A. J. 8., 8d. xlii, 247, after 
James Painter, on whose farm it was found. A green or yellow vermic- 
ulite which exfoliates strongly when heated. 

PAISBBROITB. L, J. IgeUirom, 1851, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., viii. 
148 (Paisbergit), f. Paisberg, Sweden, where it was found. A syn. of 
rhodonite. 

PAUEONATROUTB. Th. Seheerer, 1859, Pogg. Ann., cviii. 416 



PAIiAOONITB 198 PARAOONITB 

<Pal8eo-Natrolith), f. itdXaio^, 'ancient/ and natrolite, because thought to 
be the mineral from which bergmannite (natrolite) was derived. An 
obs. syn. of bergmannite. 

PALAOONITZI. W. 8. v. Waltershausen, [1846, Subm. Vulk. Ausbr. 
Val di Nolo], 1858, Walt. Vul., 179 (Palagonit), f. Palagonia, Sicily, its 
locality. A basaltic tufa, formerly considered a mineral species. 

PAIiIGK>RSKITB. T. v. Savchenkav, 1862, Min. Ges. St. Pet. Ycrh. , 
102, because found in the * Paligorischen Distauz ' (?), in the second mine 
from the river Popovka. A tough, white, fibrous mineral, probably an 
altered asbestos. 

PALLADINrra. G, U, Shepard, 1857, Shep. Min., 408, f. its com- 
position. A very doubtful palladium ochre. 

PALLADIUM. W. H. WoUaston, 1808, Phil. Trans., 290, f. naXXdi, 
•ddos, the name of the asteroid discovered Just previously. The metal 
as a mineral, usually called native palladium. 

PALLADIUM GK>LD. 7. 2>. Dana, 1850, Dana Min., 550. A 
yar. of gold containing about ten per cent of palladium. 

PANABASB. F. 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 488, f. «a?, Tcdv, 
*all,' and ficcari?, 'base,' because of the number of bases which may re- 
place each other in its composition. An obs. syn. of tetrahedrite. 

PANDBRBOTB. T. Muck, 1877, Nied. Ges. Bonn, Ber., 198 (Pan- 
dermit), f. Panderma, Asia Minor, near which place it was found. A 
var. of priceite. 

PAPBR-OOAL. An early name for dysodile, alluding to the paper- 
like leaves in which it occurs. 

Used also as a popular name for a thin -foliated var. of mineral coal. 

PAPOSITB. Z. Da/rapsky, [1887, Boletin de la Sociedad Mineria, 
Santiago, Chili, No. 92, 785], 1889, Jahrb. Min., i, 28. f. Paposa, Chili, its 
locality. Hydrous sulphate of iron, occurring in dark-red, radiated 
masses. 

PARAOOLUMBITB. C, U. 8hepard, 1851, Am. Assoc., iv, 818, f. 
Tcapd, 'near,' and columbite, from its resemblance to columbite. An 
iron-black var. of ilmenite, from near Taunton, Mass. 

PARADOXTTB. A, Breitliavpt, 1866, Berg. Httt., xxv, 85 (Para- 
doxit), f. Ttapddo^oi, ' contrary to received opinion,* because earlier views 
as to its formation were so contradictory. A flesh-red var. of orthoclase, 
from the tin mines near Mnrienberg, Saxony. 

PARAFFIN. The name for a group of wax-like minerals, found 
usually in more or less fixed combinations. 

PARAOONITB. C. E. 8ehafhunU, 1848. Ann. Ch. Pharm.. xlvi, 884 
(Paragonit), f. napdyetv, 'to mislead,' because it has been mistaken for 



parahjobnitb 199 parougoolasb 

talc. A hydrous sodium micu, massive, but often consisting of fine, 
pearly scales. 

PARAHiMBNITB. C. U, Sfiepard, 1880, A. J. S., 8d, zx, 56, be- 
cause near ilmenite. A syn. of paracolumbite. 

PARAIiOOITZI. N, Nordemkiold, 1857, Soc. Nat. Mosc. Bull. . xxx, 
221 (Paralogit), probably f. napaXoyoi, 'uncertain,' because no certain 
place in tbe system could be assigned to it. A mineral found in white or 
bluish crystals near Lake Baikal, Siberia, and thought to be an altered 
scapolite. 

PARAIiUBOMITZI. 0. SUinberg, 1844, Jour. Pk. Ch., xxxii, 495 
(Paraluminit), f. itapd, 'near/ and aluminite. A massive mineral, sim- 
ilar to aluminite in appearance and composition. 

PARAMBLAOONITB. O. A. Koenig, 1891, Acad. Nat. Sci. Proc.. 
284, f. Ttapd, *near,' and melaconite. A black oxide of copper, near 
melaconite. 

PARANKERmi. E. Boricky, 1876, Min. Mitth.. 47 (Parankerit), 
f. Itapd, 'near,' and ankerite, because like ankerite. A var. of 
ankerite, containing more than the normal amount of magnesium car- 
bonate. 

PARANTHINX3. See paranthite. 

PARANTHITB. K J. Hauy, 1806, Lucas. Tub. . (1), 205 (Paranthine), 
f. napoiyQeiv, * to wither, fade,' because it easily loses its lustre by alter- 
ation. An obs. syn. of wernerite. 

PARASrrE. (?. n. O. Volger, 1854. Pogg. Ann., xcii, 86 (Parasit), 
because formed as a parasite at tbe expense of the original mineral. 
The plumose interior of certain crystals of boracite, the result of alteration. 

PARASTILBTTZI. W. 8. v. Waltershausen, 1853, Walt. Vul., 251 
(Parastilbit), f. napd, * near,' and stilbite, because near epistilbite, of 
which it is an obs. syn. 

PARASTITE. Error for parastilbite. 

PARATHORTTB. C. U. /^epard, 1857, Shep. Min.. 287. f. napd, 
* near,' and thorite, because it resembles it. Only separated from 
thorite on account of an erroneous determination of its crystalline form. 

PAROASTTB. F. v. SteinhHl, 1815, Tasch. Min.. ix, (1), 801 (Par- 
gasit), f. Pargas, Finland, its locality. A var. of hornblende, occurring 
in green or bluish crystals. 

PARISTTB. L. di Medid-Spada, 1845, Ann. Ch. Pharm., liii, 147 
(Parisit), after J. J. Paris, its discoverer. A fluo-carbonate of the 
cerium metals, found in brownish-yellow crystals. 

PAROUaOOLASB. E, E. Sehmid, [1880, Jenaer Denkscriften, ii, 
(4). 288-875], 1881, Jahrb. Min., 1, 78 (Paroligoklas), f. napd, 'near,' and 



200 FAZTTB 

oligoclase, because very near it. A very doubtful mineral, having the 
composition of oligoclase. 

PAROPHTTB. T, 8. Hunt, 1852, Geol. Surv. Can., 96, f. reapd, 
'near/ and ophite, alluding to its resemblance to serpentine. A sub- 
stance similar to dysyntribite, but considered a rock rather than a mineral. 

PARROT-OOAIi. A popular name for a var. of cannel-coal, be- 
cause it emits a crackling noise when burning. 

PARTSOHIN. See partschinite. 

PARTSOHINITB. W. ffaidiiiger, 1848 (read 1847), Haid. Ber., iii, 
440 (Partschin), in honor of Prof. P. Partsch, of Vienna. A rare silicate 
of aluminum, iron and magnesium, found in very small crystals in aurifer- 
ous sand. 

PARTSOHITB. 0. U, 'S^tepard, 1853, A. J. S.. 2d. xv, 366, after Prof. 
P. Pftrtsch, in recognition of his study of meteorites. A very doubtful 
compound of iron, nickel, magnesium and phosporus, found in a meteoHte. 

PARTZrra. A. ArenU, 1867, A. J. S., 2d, xliii, 362, in honor of 
Dr A. F. W. Partz. A hj'^drous oxide of antimony, containing oxide 
of copper and other bases. 

PASSAUITB. C, F. Naumann, 1855, Naum. Min., 305 (Passauit), 
because from near Passau, Bavaria. A var. of wernerite, also called 
porcelain-spar. 

PASSYITB. B. Marchand, 1874, Ann. Ch. Phys., 5th, i, 392, in honor 
of A. Passy. An impure var. of quartz, found in white, earthy masses. 

PASTRBITII. Norman, 1866, Nied. Ges. Bonn. 17 (Pastreit), 

in honor of Prest. Pastre, of Marseilles, France. A ferric sulphate, near 
raimondite. 

PASTRBRITII. Error for pastreite. 

PATBRAITII. W, Haidinger, 1856, Geol. Reich. Jahrb., vii, 196 
(Paterait), after A. Patera, who first examined it. A somewhat doubt- 
ful molybdate of cobalt; an amorphous, black mineral. 

PATRINITII. W. Hdidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 568 (Patrinit), 
after E. L. M. Patrin, who had examined it. An obs. syn. of aikinite. </ 

PATTBRSONITB. /. Lea, 1867, Acad. Nat. Sci. Proc, 45, after 
Johnson Patterson, owner of the farm adjoining the one on which it was 
found. A micaceous mineral closely allied to thuringite, but never 
fully described. 

PAtJLITB. A. O. Werner, 1812 (not published), 1815, HoflP. Min., 
ii. (2), 143 (Paulit), f. St. Paul Isl., Labrador, its locality. A syn. of 
hyperstbene. 

PAUSSAUITB. Error for passauite. 

PAZITB. See pacite. 



PSAOB 901 PBLB'S HAIR 

PBAOH. Of uooertain derlTatloo. A name for chlorite, used by 
Comiflh miners. 

PBAOOOK-OOAIi. An early name for iridescent coal. 

PBAOOOK-OOPPBR. An early name for bomitc, alluding to its 
beautiful iridescent coloring. 

PBAOOOK-ORB. A miners' name for ores of copper showing an 
iridescent tarnish, including bornite and chalcopyrite. 

PBAUTB. F. M, EndUeh, 1878, Hayd. Sunr. 6th Rept., 158, after 
Dr. A. C. Peal, its discoverer. A var. of geyserite, containing a very 
small per cent of water. 

PBA-ORB. See bean-ore. 

PBARIfBSIOA. F. Mohi, 1820, Mohs Char., 68, f. its appearance. 
An obs. syn. of margarite. 

PBARI.-SINTER. O. 8anU, [1706. Santi Yoy., 124], 1801, Reuss 
Min., (2), i, 248 (Perlsinter), alluding to its appearance. A syn. of 
fiorite (siliceous sinter). 

PBARIf-SPAR. An early name for crystallized dolomite showing 
a pearly lustre, including also some ankerite. 

PBA-8TONB. See pisolite. 

PBOEHAMITB. J. L. Smith, 1880, A. J. S., 8d, xx. 186, after 
Prof. S. F. Peckham, to whom the author * was indebted for every facility 
for examining it.' A greenish-yellow silicate of iron and magnesium, 
found in meteoric iron. 

PBCTOUTB. F. V, Kobeli, 1828, Arch. Ges. Nat., xiii, 885 (Pecto- 
lith), f. itijKroi, * well put together,' alluding to its structure, and XiBoi. 
Hydrous silicate of calcium and sodium, found in aggregations of acicular 
crystals, often showing a radiated form. 

PBOANTTB. A, BreiihaupU 1880, Jour. Ch. Ph., Ix, 808 (Peganit), 
f. nj/^ffvov, * rue,' in allusion to its color. Hydrous phosphate of alu- 
minum, found in green incrustations on quartz. 

PBLAOITB. A. H. Church, 1876, Min. Mag , i, 62, f. ndXdyoi, 
'the sea,' because coming from the deep-sea bottom. A name given to 
certain manganese nodules obtained in deep-sea soundings. 

PBLAQONITB. Error for palagonite. 

PBUkOOSITB. K, Moier, 1878, Min. Mitth., i, 174 (Pelagosit), 
because found on the island of Pelagosa. A thin, dark-colored incrusta- 
tion on dolomite, consisting essentially of calcium carbonate, probably 
produced by the action of sea- water. 

PBIaB'S HAIR. From Ranoho o Peld. ' hair of Peld,' the goddess of 
the volcano Eilauea, 1849. Dana Geol. Pacif., 200, in allusion to its volcanic 
origin. Volcanic glass occurring in hair-like shapes. 



PBLHABAINB 203 PBPLOLITB 

PBLHAMINB. C, U. Shepard, 1876, Shep. Cont. Min., 8, f. Pelham, 
Mass , its locality. A doubtful silicate of iron and magnesium, closely 
resembling serpentiDe. 

PBLHAMITB. J. P. Cooke and F. A, Oooeh, 1876, A. J. S., 3d, x. 
309. A var. of jefferisite from Pelham, Mass. 

PBLIOANITB. A. Ouchakoff, 1858, Acad. St. Pet. Bull., xvi, 12ft 
No derivation given. An obs. syn. of cimolite. 

PBLIOM. A. O. Werner, 1818, Hoff. Min., Iv, (2), 117, f. n€Xioo^a, 
* livid,* in allusion to its grayish- blue color. A syn. of iolite. 

PBLOOONITE. O. F. Rtchter, 1831, Pogg. Ann., xxi, 591 (Pelo- 
konit), f. neXo?, * dark-colored,* and Kovia, *dust,' alluding to its color 
and structure. A brownish-black var. of lampadite. 

PBLOSIDBRITB. F, Zirkel, 1885, Naum. Min., 457 (Pelosiderit), 
f. it€X6%, 'dark- colored,' and ai8r;poS, 'iron,' referring to its color and 
composition. A syn. of oligonite. 

PBNOAIilTB. Error for pencatite. 

PBNOATITB. F Roth, 1851, Zt. Geol., iii, 140 (Pencatit), in honor 
of Count J. Marzari-Pencati. A syn. of predazzite. 

PBNOIIf-STONB. A popular name for pyrophyllite, because slate 
pencils are made from it. 

PBNFIBLDITB. F A. Oenth, 1892, A. J. S., 3d, xliv, 260. in 
honor of Prof. S. L. Penfield. Chloride of lead, formed by the action 
of sea-water on the ancient slags of Laurium, Greece. 

PBNNINB. See penninite. 

PBNNINITB. /. Frobel and E. Sehtoeizer, 1840, Pogg. Ann., 1, 523 
(Pennin), f. the Pennine Alps, its locality. Hydrous silicate of alumi- 
num, iron and magnesium, occurring in crystals of various colors and 
closely related to clinochlore. 

PBNNITE. R. Hermann, 1849, Jour. Pk. Ch.. xlvii, 18 (Pennit), 
because found in Pennsylvania. A var. of hydrodolomite colored green 
by nickel. 

PENTAOLASITB. /. F, L. Hausmann, 1818, Haus. Min., 11, 687 
(Pentaklasit), f. TC^vre, * five,* and kXccv, * to break,' because it was thought 
to cleave in five directions. An obs. syn. of pyroxene. 

PENTIiANDITE. A. Dufrenoy, 1856, Duf. Min., ii, 549, after J. B. 
Pentland, who first brought it to notice. Sulphide of nickel and iron, of 
a light bronze-yellow color. 

PBNWITUITE. J, H. Collins, 1878, Min. Mag., il, 91, f. Pen with, 
Cornwall, Eng., its locality. Hydrous silicate of manganese, of a 
yellowish or reddish-brown color. 

PBPIiOUTB. C. P. CarlBson, 1857, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., xlv. 



PBPONITB 208 PBSUiLmi 

241 (Peplolit), f. it^nXoi, ' a covering,' because the altered material forms 
a covering over the unaltered part, and XiOo?. One of the names given 
to altered iolite. 

PBPONrrB. A, Breithaupt, 1882, Brett. Char., 112 (Peponit), f. 
n^ni»y, 'soft,' probably because not so hard as some similar minerals. 
Not sufficiently described for identification, perhaps tremolite. 

PBROYLmi. H, J. Brooke, 1850. Phil. Mag.. 8(1. xxxvi. 181, after 
Dr. John Percy, who analyzed it, and XBoi, A sky-blue oxy-chloride of 
lead and copper. 

PBRIOLASB. See periclasite. 

PBRIOLA8ITB. A. Scaeehi, 1841 (read 1840), Scac. Min., 28, Peri- 
dasia), f. nepi and KXotaii, alluding to its very perfect cleavage. Mag- 
nesium oxide, occurring In white grains, with a perfect cubical cleav- 
age. 

PBRIOLINB. A, Breiihaupt, 1823. Breit. Char., 278 (Periklin), f. 
iteptKXivT^, 'sloping on all sides,' because of the grent inclination between 
the terminal and the lateral faces. A var. of albite, found in large, 
opaque white crystals. 

PBRIDOT. Of uncertain derivation. An early name for chr3'So1ite, 
still used in France. 

Yellowish-green tourmaline from Brazil and Ceylon Is also called 
peridot. 

PBRISTBRTTB. T, IJiomsan, 1848. Phil. Mag., 8d, xxii, 189, f. 
neptarepcL, ' the pigeon,' because its colors resemble those seen on the 
neck of a pigeon. An iridescent var. of albite. 

PBRLIMONITB. 0. U. Shepard, 1857, Shep. Min. Supp., p. vi., f. 
fe4p, and Hmonite. The hydrated peroxide of iron deposited by chalyb- 
eate springs. 

PBROF8KITB. O. Rose, 1889. Pogg. Ann., xlviii, 558 (Perowskit), 

In honor of von Perovski. Titanate of calcium, occurring in 

brownish or black, isometric crystals. 

PBROW8KTN. Jf. Nbrdenskiold, 1885, Pogg. Ann., xxxvi, 478 

(Perowskin), in honor of von Perovski, a Russian mineralogist. An 

obs. syn. of triphylite. 

PBR8BBROITB. Z. /. IgeUtr&m, 1888, Yet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., xi, 91, 
f. I^jsrsberg, Sweden, its locality. An alteration product of nephelite, 
found in red or grayish-green, bladed crystals. 

PBRTHITB. T, Thanuon, 1883, Shep. Min.. (1), 282. f. Perth. On- 
tario, its locality. An interlamination of orthoclase and albite, at first 
considered a distinct var. of orthoclase. 

PB8ILUTB. /. /. N. Huot, 1841, Huot Min., i 289, f. Pesillo^ 



PBTAUTE 204 PHARB£A.OHOLZITB 

Piedmont, its locality. A mangaDese mineral produced by the alteration 
of rhodonite, its loss of silica being almost complete. 

PBTAUTB. B. J, cTAndrada, 1800, All. Jour. Cbem., iv, 36 (Pe- 
talit), f. Tt^raXov, * a leaf/ in allusion to its cleavage. Silicate of alum- 
inum and lithium, found in colorless or grayish crystals and cleavable 
masses. 

PBTROLBNB. J. B. BaussingauU, 1886, Jour. Pk. Ch., ix. 282 
(Petroleu). An oil similar to petroleum, obtained from bitumen and tiu- 
nounced as the liquid ingredient of all asphalt. 

PBTROLBUM. G. Agricola, 1546, Agric, 229, f. petra, 'rock,* 
and oleum, 'oil.' Mineral (rock) oil, the well-known source of kero- 
sene. 

PBTROSUjBZ. An early name for compact feldspar, now considered 
a rock and called felsite. 

PETTKOITB. A, Paulinyi, 1867, Jahrb. Min., 458 (Pettkoit), in 
bonor of J. yon Pettko. Acid sulphate of iron, probably identical with 
-voltaite. 

PBTZITB. F: Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 556 (Petzit), after 
IV. Petz, who had earlier called it tellursilber. Telluride of silver, con- 
taining a variable amount of gold. 

PPAPFITB. J. J. N, HuoU 1841. Huot Min.. i, 192, after Dr. C. H. 
Pfaff, who had earlier called it Bleischimmer, 1819, Jour. Ch. Ph., xxvii, 
1. An obs. syn. of jamesouite. 

Also used by Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 37. A syn. of bind- 

heimite. 

PHA ACTINITE. O. A. BerteU, 1874, Berz. Jahres. , 1267 (Phftctinit), 
probably f vom. (paivea^ai and a Kris, -ivoS, * to show rays,' in allusion to 
its structure. A decomposition product of amphibole, near delessite. 

PHAOBLITB. See phacellite. 

PHAOBLLITB. E. Scaechh 1888, Nap. Ac. Rend., 486 (Facellita), f. 
<f)ocK€\Xo^, (for (fxxKeXoi), *a bundle,' alluding to the fagot-like shape of 
its crystals. G. Hintee writes it phacelite, 1889, Hintze Min., ii, 96. A 
jsyn. of kaliophilite. 

PHAOOIilTB. A. Breithaupt, 1836, Jahrb. Min. 663 (Phakolit), f. 
^aKoi^ ' a bean,' alluding to the shape of its crystals, and XiBoS. A 
colorless var. of chabazitc, found in crystals so highly modified as to have 
J8L lenticular shape. 

PHiESTINB. A. BreithaupU 1823, Breit. Char.. 180 (Phftstiu). prob- 
ably f. (f>aiaT6i, * illustrious, shining,' in allusion to its lustre. An altered 
bronzite resembling schiller spar. 

PHARMAOHOIiZITB. Error for pharmacochalzite. 



PHARMAOOOHALOITS 205 PHCENIOOOHROITB 

PHABMAOOOHALOITR J. F. L, Batismann, 1813, Haus. MId., 
iii, 1042 (Pharmakochalzit), f. <f>dpudKoy, 'poison,' and ;faAK'o?, ' copper/ 
because a compound of arsenic and copper. An obs. syn. of olivenite. 

FHARMAOOOHAIiZTTS. See pbarmacochalcite. 

PHARMAOOLITII. D. L. O. KarsUn, 1800, Karst. Tab.. 75 (PUar- 
macolitby f. <t>(xpptdKov, * poison/ because it contains so mucb arsenic, and 
A/do?. Hydrous arsenate of calcium, found in acicular, silky, fibrous 
masses, wbite or slightly tinged with gray or red. 

PHARMAOOSIDERITI]. J. F. L, Hauimann, 1818, Haus. Min., 
iii, 1066 (Pharmakosiderit), f. (pccp/idKor, 'poison/ and criSrjpoi, 'iron, 
because a compound of arsenic and iron. Hydrous arsenate of iron, 
found in various shades of green, red or yellow, usually in minute crystals. 

PHENAOITB. N. NordenaMold, 1833, Vet. Ak. Stock., 160 (Phena- 
kit), f. (peva^.-aKOi, 'a cheat,' because it had been mistaken for quartz. 
Sillicate of glucinum, found in brilliant, transparent crystals. 

PHENOrra. H. F. Link, 1810, Ges. Nat. Berl. Mag., iv, (8). 227 

(Phengit), f. (peyyo^, * lustre,' alluding to its brilliant appearance. The 

actual species intended is not positively known. It has been referred to 

topaz, aquamarine and anhydrite. A, Breiihaupt, 1841, Breit. Handb., 

ii, 398, uses it as a genus name under mica. F. o. Kobell, 1853, Kob. Taf., 

62, confines the name to muscovite, of which it is now an obs. syn. 

PHIIiADBLPHITE. ff. C. Le\ois, 1880. Acad. Nat. Sci. Proc., 818 

» 

f. Philadelphia, its locality. A brownish-red, micaceous mineral, closely 
related to jefterisite. 

PHIT,I,TPITB. 1. DomeykOy 1876, Min. Chili App. 5, 38. Hydrous 
sulphate of iron and copper, found in blue masses, resulting from the 
decomposition of chalcopyrite. 

Variant of phillipsite (Beudaut). 
A. Levy, 1825, Ann. Phil., 2d, x, 362, in honor of 
Wm. Phillips. Hydrous silicate of aluminum, calcium and potassium, 
found usually in white, cruciform crystals. 

Also used hjF, 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 411, after R. Phillips, 
"Who had analyzed it. A syn. of bomite. 

PHI«OGK>PITB. A. Breitliaupt, 1841, Breit. Handb., ii, 898 (Phlog- 
opit). f. (pXor-ooiroi, 'fiery,' in allusion to its fiery-red color, and to the 
color it exhibits when heated in the blowpipe flame. Silicate of magne- 
sium, aluminum and potassium, one of the mica group, often of a copper- 
red color. 

PHCSNIOITB. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 504 (PhOnicit), 

abbreviated from phoenicochroite, of which it is an obs. syn. 

PHCENIOOOHROITB. E. F. Oloeker, 1839, Glock. Min., 612 



FHCESTINB 206 PHOSPHOROOHALOITB 

(PbOnikochroit), f. tpoivt^, -iKoi, 'purple-red/ and XPotd, 'color/ in 
allusion to its color. Basic cbromate of lead, found in brilliant, red, 
tabular crystals. 

PHCBSTINB. Variant of pbsestine. 

PHOLERITE. J. Quillemin, 1826, Ann. des M., xi. 489, f. <poXis, * a 
scale,' iu allusion to its structure. Hydrous silicate of aluminum, occur- 
ring in aggregations of minute, pearly scales, now classed witb kaolinite. 

PHOLIBOLITII. G. Nordensldold, 1890, Geol. F5r. F5rb., xii, 348 
(Folidolit), f. 0oAi5, -i(5o?, *a scale,' in allusion to its structure, and A/6o5. 
Hydrous silicate of aluminum, magnesium and potassium, found in 
aggregations of minute, crystalline scales. 

PHONITB. G, E. Keyser, [1834, Min. Samm. Berg., 65], 1837, Glock. 
Jabres. for 1835, 191 (Pbonit), perbaps f. (pooyy, *a sound,' because it 
gives a ringing sound when struck. An obs. name for yellowish-brown, 
transparent elaeolite. 

PHOSGENrm. A. Breithaupt, 1820, Breit. Char., 14 (Pbosgen- 
spath), f. pbosgen, the old name of carbon oxy chloride, because it contains 
carbon, oxygen and chlorine. Cbloro-carbonate of lead, occurring in 
brilliant, white or yellow crystals. 

PHOSPHAMMITE. Variant of phosphammonite. 

PHOSPHAMMONITE. C. U. Shepard, 1852, Shep. Min., 67, f. its 
composition. Phosphate of ammonia, found in crystals in guano. 

PHOSPHOOERTTE. H. Watts, 1850 (read 1849), Jour. Chem. Soc., 
ii, 131, f. its composition. Near cryptolite, if not identical witb it. 

PHOSPHOOELA.LOITE. Variant of pbospborochalcite. 

PHOSPHOOHROMITE. R. Hermann, 1870. Jour. Pk. Cb., i, 447 
(Pbosphocbromit), because it contains both phosphoric acid and chromium. 
A var. of vauquelinite. 

Also used by G. U. Shepard, 1877, Shep. Cont. Min., 7, for a hypo- 
thetical phosphate of chromium, supposed to be the coloring matter of 
elroquite. 

PHOSPHOLITE. B. Kirtoan, 1794, Kirw. Min., i, 128, f. phosphorus 
and XiBoi. An obs. syn. of phosphorite. 

PHOSPHORGXTMMITE. B. Bntnann, 1859, Jour. Pk. Ch., Ixxvi, 
327 (Phosphor-Gummit). A gummite containing phosphorus. 

PHOSPHORITE. B. Kirwan, 1794, Kirw. Min.. i. 129, f. phos- 
phorus, because it contains it. An early syn. of apatite, now used only 
for a compact, radiated var. from Spain. 

PHOSPHOROCHAIiOITE. E. F. Glocker, 1831, Glock. Min., 847 
(Phosphorochalcit), f. Phosphor, and jforAK-o'S, 'copper,' alluding to its 
composition. A syn. of pseudomalacbite. 



207 PIOOUTB 

PHOSPHOSIDBRrrB. W. Bruhns and K Bim, 1890, Zt. Kryst.. 
zvii. 556 (Phosphosiderit), f. Phosphor, and atdifpos, 'iron.' Hydrous 
phosphate of iron, found in tninsparent, red, prismatic crystals. 

PHOSPHURANYLITS. F. A. Oent/i, 1879, A. J. S . 3d, xviii, 158. 
f. its composition, and Xi^oi. Hydrous phosphate of uranium, occurring 
as a yellow, pulverulent incrustation. 

PHOSPHTTTRrm. B, J, Chapman, 1848, Chap. Miu.. 83, because 
it contains phosphoric acid and yttria. An obs. syu. of xeuotime. 

PHOTICITE. E. F. Oermar, 1819, Jour. Ch. Ph., xxvi, 116 (Pho- 
ticit), perhaps f. tfxSrtliety, *to enlighten,' in allusion to the use of manga- 
nese in decolorizing glass. A var. of rhodonite, altered by the absorption 
of carbon dioxide. 

PHOTIZITB. Variant of photicite. 

PHOTOLrm. A, Breiihaupt. 1882, Breit. Char., 181 (Photolith), f. 
0g5>. 0o9rJ;, Might/ because it phosphoresces by friction, and Ai9o$. 
A genus name including pectoHte and wollastouite. 

PHTLUTB. T, Thonuon, 1828, Ann. Lye. N. Y., iii, 47, f. (pvXXov, 
'a leaf,' in allusion to its structure. A syn. of ottrelite. 

PHTIXORBTIN. J. O. Forchhammer, [1889, Eong. Dan. Yid. 
Sels.]. 1840, Jour. Pk. Ch., xx, 469, f. tpdXXov, 'a leaf,' and pTfrirrf, 
'resin,' from its structure. A resin near flchtelite, obtained from pine 
wood preserved in peat beds. 

PHTSAUTE. A. G. Werner, 1818, Hoff. Min., iv, (2), 116 (Physa- 
litb). A contraction of pyrophysalith. An obs. syn. of topaz. 

PHTTOOOLLTTB. ff. 0. Lewie, 1881, Am. Phil. Soc., xx, 117, f. 
fpvr oy, ' a plant,' and KoXXd, ' glue, Jelly.' A name suggested for cer- 
tain jelly-like hydrocarbons found in peat. 

PIAUZTTB. W. Haidinger, 1844. Pogg. Ann., Ixii. 276 (Piauzit), f. 
Piauze, Austria, its locality. A hydrocarbon similar in composition to 
asphaltum, but slaty in structure and with a very high melting point. 

PIOTTB. A, Niee, [1880, Ber. d. oberhessiche Gesellschaft, xix], 
1881, Jahrb. Min., 1. 116, because it closely resembles A. BreithaupVe 
Picites resinaceus, 1847, Breit. Handb., iii, 897, f. pix, picis, 'pitch,' 
alluding to its appearance. Hydrous phosphate of iron, found in 
amorphous, thin, dark brown coatings. 

PIOKBRINOITB. A. A, Hayee, 1844, A. J. S . xlvi, 860, in honor 
of John Pickering, President of the American Academy. Hydrous sul- 
phate of aluminum and magnesium, found in masses of silky, white 
fibres. 

PIONOTROPB. See pycnotrope. 

PIOOUTB. Error for picotite. 



PIOOTTm 208 PIOROSMINB 

PIOOTTTB. J. O. F. V. Charpentier, 1812, Jour, des M., xxxii, 330, 
after Picot de la Peyrouse, who had described it. A vur. of spinel con- 
taining chromium. 

PIORANAIiOIME. J. Meneghini and E. Beehi, 1852. A. J. S., 2d, 
xiv, 62, f. niKpoi, * bitter,' and analcime, because it is a var. of analcine 
containing magnesia (see picrolite). 

PIORTTE. A, Brongniari, 1807, Broug. Min., i, 230, f. niKpoi, 
'bitter,' because it contains magnesia (see picrolite). An obs. syn. of 
dolomite, bitter-spar. 

PIOROAIiliUMOGENE. Q. Foster, [1876. Boll. Com. Geol., No. 
7, 297], 1877, Jahrb. Min., 531, f. niKpoi, * bitter,* and allumogene, be- 
cause similar to allumogene (alunogen), but containing magnesia (see pic- 
rolite). A pinkish-white sulphate of aluminum and magnesium, near 
pickeringite. 

PIOROEPIDOTE. A . Damour and A, Des Cloizeaux, 1883, Bull. 
Soc. Min., vi, 26 (picro-epidote), f. niKpoS, 'bitter' (see picrolite). andcpi- 
dote. A magnesian var. of epidote. 

PIOROFIiXTTTE. A. E. Arppe, 1861 (read 1869), Soc Sci. Fenn., vi, 
682, f . ntKfjo^y ' bitter ' (see picrolite), and fluor, because it contains both 
magnesia and fluorine. A doubtful species, perhaps a mixture of fluo- 
rite with a silicate of magnesium. 

PIOROLINE. Variant of picrolite. 

PIOROLTTE. J, F. L, Hausmann, 1808. Moll Jahrb. Efem., iv, 
401 (Picrolit), f. ntKpoS, * bitter,' because it is a stone containing magnesia, 
and Xi^oS, Salts of magnesia are frequently bitter, hence vtKpoS has 
often been used in forming the names of magnesian minerals. A fibrous 
or columnar var of serpentine. 

PIOROMERIDE. See picromerite. 

PIOROMERTTE. A. Scacchi, 1855, Scac. Yesuv., 192 (Picromeride), 
f. TtiKpoS, * bitter,' and jnepis, -iSoS, ' a part,' because it contains magnesia 
(see picrolite). Sulphate of magnesium and potassium, found in white 
crystals and crystalline crusts. 

PIOROPHARMAOOLITE. Fr. Stromeyer, 1819, Ann. d. Phys., 
Ixi, 185 (Picropharmacolit), f. niKp6%, * bitter * (see picrolite), and phannaco- 
lite. A var. of pharmacolite, containing magnesium. 

PIOROPHTLIi. X. F. Svanberg, 1839, Pogg. Ann., 1, 662, f. 
niKpoiy ' bitter * (see picrolite), and <f)vXXov, * a leaf,' in allusion to its 
composition and appearance. A foliated mineral containing magnesium, 
produced from the alteration of pyroxene. 

PIOROSMINE. W. Haidinger, 1824, Mohs Grund., ii. 666 (Pikros- 
min), f. niKpoi, * bitter ' (see picrolite), and oa/^tft * odor,' alluding to its 



PIOROTANITB 209 PIMBLITE 

bitter and argillaceous odor when moistened. A doubtful, greenish- white 
or gray, hydrous silicate of magnesium. 

PIOROTANITB. Bee picrotitanite. 

PIOROTBPHROmi. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 259, f. iriKpo?. 
'bitter' (see picrolite), and tephroite. A var. of tepliroite containing 
much magnesia. 

PIOROTHOMSONITB. J. Meneghini and B. Bechi, 1852, A. J. 8 , 
2d, xiv, 68. f . niKpo^, * bitter ' (see picrolite), and thomsonite. Similar to 
thomsonite. but with the soda rephiced by magnesia. , 

PIOROTTTANITB. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dan a Min., 144 (Picrotanite) 
(error?), f. niKfjoi, ' bitter ' (see picrolite), and titanite. A var. of titanic 
iron (ilmenite), containing magnesium. 

PIOTTTB. /. 0. DelanUthtrie, 1797, Delam. T. T., ii, 282, after Prof. 
M. A. Pictet, who had described it. An obs. syn. of titanite. 

PIDDINGTONITB. W, Haidinger, 1860, K. Ak. Wien, zli, 251 
(Piddingtonit), after H. Piddington, who had described it. The ash- 
gray mass of a meteorite found at Shalka, India. 

PIBDMONTTTB. A, KenngoU, 1858. Kenng. Min., 75 (Piemontit), 
f. Piemonte (Piedmont), its locality. Silicate of aluminum, manganese, 
iron and calcium, called often manganese epidote. 

PIOOTTTB. /. F. W, Johnston, 1840, Phil. Mag., 8d, xvii, 882, after 
Rev. M. Pigot, who assisted in its discovery. A salt of alumina with so- 
called mudeseoui add, said to be the result of the action of wet vegetation 
OD granite. 

PIHUTB. N. O. Srfttrdm, 1889, Vet. Ak. Stock., 155 (Pihlit), after 
A. Pihl, a Swedish mine-director. Hydrous silicate of aluminum and 
other bases, resembling white mica, perhaps pseudomorphous after spodu- 
mene. 

PHiARTTE. D. M. Kramberger, 1880, Zt. Kryst. . v, 260 (Pilarit), in 
honor of Prof. G. Pilar. A var. of chrysocolla, containing much 
alumina. 

PUJNITB. a, v. Laiaulx, 1876, Jahrb. Min., 858 (Pilinit), f. 
niXivoi, 'made of felt,' in allusion to its structure. Hydrous silicate 
of calcium and aluminum, found in felt-like masses resembling asbestos. 

PILOIilTB. M. F. Hoddle, 1878, Min. Mag., ii, 206. f. irUo?, ' felt,' 
in allusion to its structure, and AxSo?. A name given to certain minerals 
previously called mountain-cork and mountain leather. 

PILSBNTTB. A, KenngoU, 1853, Kenng. Min., 121 (Pilsenit), f. 
Deutsch-Pilsen, Hungary, its locality. An obs. syn. of wehrlite. 

PIMBUTB. D. Z. Q, KanUn, 1800, Karst. Tab., 28 (Pimelit), f. 
itiM€X^, ' fat,' in allusion to its appearance. Hydrous silicate of alumi- 



PINAKIOLmi 210 PISTAOITB 

Dum, iron, nickel and magnesium, of an apple-green color and greasy 
lustre. 

Also used by C. SchmidU 1844, Pogg. Ann., Ixi, 888 (Pimelit). A 
gyn. of alipite. 

PINAKIOUTB. O. Flink, 1890. Zt. Kryst., xviii. 861 (Pinakiolit), 
f. ntvdKiov, *a small tablet,' because it occurs in small, tabular crystals, 
and A/6o?. Borate of manganese and magnesium, found in brilliant, 
black, metallic crystals. 

PINGUmi. A. Brdthaupt, 1829, Jour. Cb. Ph., Iv, 803 (Pinguit), 
f. pingue, 'fat,' from its appearance. A var. of cbloropal, of oil-green 
color and the consistency of soap. 

FINITE. D, L. O. Karaten, 1800, Karst. Tab., 28 (Pinit), f. the 
Pini mine, near Scbneeberg, Saxony, its locality. Hydrous silicate of 
aluminum and potassium, resulting from the alteration of iolite, spodumene 
and other minerals, and having various crystalline forms in consequence. 
It has the composition of muscovite, of which it is sometimes regarded as 
a compact variety. 

PINTTOID. A. Enop, 1859, Jahrb. Min., 558. A rock similar to 
pinite, whence its name. 

PINNOITB. H. 8tauU, 1884, Deut. Ch. Ges. Ber., xvii. 1584 (Pin- 
Uoit), in honor of Oberbergrath Pinno. Hydrous borate of magne- 
sium, foiind in yellow or green, fibrous masses. 

PIOTINB. L. F. Svanberg, 1841, Pogg. Ann., liv, 267 (Piotin), f. 
niorr;?, ' fat,* from its greasy lustre. An obs. syn. of saponite. 

PIPXI-STONE. The red clay used for pipes by the American Indians 
of the Northwest, called also catlinite. 

PISANITE. A. Kenngott, 1860, Kenng. Ueb. for 1859, 10 (Pisanit), 
after F. Pisani, who described it. Sulphate of iron and copper, occurring 
in concretionary forms of a bright blue color 

PISOLITE. From pisum, 'the pea,' and A.z9o?. An early name 
for limestone when made up of concretions of the size of small peas. 

PISSASPHALT. See pittnsphalt. 

PISSrrE. J. a DelametfieHe, 1795, Delam. T. T., iii, 461, f. niaad, 
'pitch,' alluding to its appearance. An obs. syn. of both semiopal and 
pitcbstone, which had not then been separated. 

PISSOPHANE. See pissophauite. 

PISSOPHANITE. A. BreithaupU 1880, Breit. Uib., 27 (Pissophan), 
f. 7ci(T<rd, 'pitch,' and (paiveaBai, 'to appear,' because pitch-like in 
appearance. Hydrous sulphate of iron and aluminum, of greenish color 
and stalactitic structure. 

PISTAOITB. A, Q. Werner, 1804, Ludw. Min., ii, 209 (Pistazit), f. 



PISTOBSESTTB 211 PLAOODINB 

KioraKta, * the pistachio nut/ in allusion to its color. Au obs. syn. of 
cpidote. 

PISTOMBSITB. A, BreUhaupt, 1847. Pogg. Add., Ixx. 148 (Pisto- 
inesit), f. irioToS, 'true,* and uSaov^ 'the middle,' because considered 
to be the exact mean between umgnesite and siderite. The var. of 
mcsitite wbich contains least magnesium and most iron. 

PrrOH-BLBNDB. A. Cronatedt, 1758, Crons. Min., 186 (Pcch- 
blende), f. its appearance. A syn. of uraniuite. 

PITOH-OOAIi. A, Q, Werner, 1789, Berg. Jour., i, 880 (Pechkohle), 
f. its appearance. An early name for brown coal or jet. 

PITOH-ORXI. See pitchy copper ore. 

Also a syn. of pitch-blende. 

PTTOHSTONB. An early name (Pechstein) used by German writers 
for amorphous felsite which has a pitchy lustre. Some opal and other 
minerals were also included. 

PITOHT OOPPBR ORB. An early name (Pecherz) for a dark 
colored oxide of copper which looks like pitch. 

PITOHT IRON ORB. D, L. O, KanUn, 1806, Karst. Tab., 66 
(Eisenpecherz), f. its appearance. Au obs. syn. of pitticite. 

This name (Eisenpecherz) was also used by F. Mohi, 1804, in his 
'NuWs Mineralienkabinet, iii, 428, as a syn. of triplite. 

PITKARANDITB. See pitkarautite. 

PTTKARANTITB. Th. SeJieerer, 1854, Pogg. Ann., xciii, 100 
(Pitkarandit), f. Pltkfiranto, Finland, its locality. An altered pyroxene 
near pyrallolite. 

PITKBRINGITB. Error for pickeringite. 

PITTASPHAI<T. Dioseoradei, about 50, Dioacor., Lib. i. Cap. 100, 
54 (Uirr .aaifhrXroS), PUny, 77, Pliny Hist., Bk. 24. 25 (pissasphaltus). 
A name for the more viscid varieties intermediate between petroleum and 
bitumen. 

PrmOITB. /. F, L, Hausmann, 1818, Haus. Min., i, 285 (Pittizit). 
f. Tcirrd, ' pitch,' because it was earlier called pitch-ore. Hydrous sulph- 
arsenate of iron, found in yellowish, reddish and brownish reniform 
masses. 

Also used by F. 8. Beudant, 1824, Beud. Min., 447 (Pittizite). A 
syn. of glockerite, dropped because of its earlier use. 

PrmNTTB. B. Hermann, 1859, Jour. Pk. Ch., Ixxvi, 822 (Pitti- 
nerz), f. A, BreOJiaupfi PiltinErz, 1832, Breit. Char., 218, f. nirrd, 
* pitch,' because earlier included under the name Uran pecherz. A black 
▼ar. of gum mite. 

PLAOODINB. A. BreiViaupU 1841. Pogg. Ann., liii, 681 (Plako- 



PLAQIOO I T KITI J 212 PLESSITEr 

din), f. nXdKoodrfi, * flat/ in allusion to tbe tabular form of its crystals. 
Arsenide of nickel, now considered as probably a furnace product. 

PliAGIOOITRITE. 8. Singer, 1879. Siug. luaug., 18 (Plagiocitrit), 
f. nXdyioi, * inclined,' and Kirpov, ' yellow,' from its crystallization and 
color. Hydrous sulphate of aluminum and other bases, found in molo- 
clinic or triclinic, yellow crystals. 

PliAGIOOLASE. A. Breithaupt. 1847, Breit. Handb., iii, 492, f. 
nXdyioi, 'oblique,' and KXdv, Mo cleave,* because its two principal 
cleavages are not at right angles to each other. A general name, in- 
cluding several triclinic feldspars. 

PliAGIONITB. (?. Bose, 1833, Pogg. Ann., xxviii. 421 (Plagionit), f. 
TcXdyioSf * inclined,' because of its crystallization. Sulph-antimonide of 
lead, occurring in grayish -black, monoclinic crystals. 

PliANBRirB, R Hermann, 1862, Soc. Nat. Mosc. Bull., xxxv, 
(3), 240, after Mine Director Planer, who discovered it. Hydrous photfs* 
phate of aluminum, perhaps an impure var. of wavellite. 

PIjASMA. Probably f. TtAaV/za, 'something moulded or imitated,' 
perhaps because it was used for intaglios. A green, spotted var. of sub* 
translucent quartz, nearl}' like heliotrope. 

PIjASTER-STONE. a popular name for gypsum, referring to ita 
use when burned and ground. 

PliATINIRIDIUM. L. F. Svanberg, 1834, Berz. Jahres., xv. 205. 
A syn. of native iridium, which always contains some platinum. 

PliATINUM. A. de Ulloa, [1748, Relac. Hist., Bk. 6. Chap. 10], 
Wm. Brownrigg, 1750, Phil. Trans., 584, f. 'Platina di Piuto,' its Spanish 
designation. The metal as a mineral usually called native platinum. 

PLATTNBRITB. W, ffaidinger, 1845, Hnid. Handb., 504 (Piatt ner- 
ite), after Prof. K. F. Plattner, who had described it. Native peroxide 
of lead, found in violet-black, globular concretions. 

PLBNARGTRITB. F. v, Sandberger, 1882, Sand. Uut. Erz., i. 97, 
(Plenargyrit), f. plenus, 'full,' and afjyupoS, ' silver,* alluding to its com- 
position, Sulphide of silver and bismuth, resembling miargyrite. 

PIjBNGITB. Error for phengite. 

PIjBONASTB. B. J. Hauy, 1801, Hatly Min., iii, 12. f. nXeovaaroi, 
' abundant,' because its crystals exhibit so many different faces. A syn. 
of ceylonite. 

PliBONBOTITB. L. J, Tgelsirom, 1889, Geol. F5r. FOrh., xi, 210 
(Pleouektit), f. TtXeoveKray, * to have more,' because more than one an- 
timony mineral was found at the locality. Phosphate of antimon}' and 
lead, never fully analyzed. 

PIjBSSITB. K. v. Beicheribach, 1861, Pogg. Ann., cxiv, 269 (Plessit), 



PLBURASTTB 213 PLX7MBOFBRRITB 

stated to be from nXeoa, nXtaato; perhaps in error for nXrfpooa, nXrfpoSaa), 
* I fill/ because it was earlier called Falleisen. That part of certain mete- 
oric irons which forms the ground mass (the filling). 

Also used by J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 78, for the var. of gers- 
dorflSte analyzed by Franz Pless, whence the name. 

PLEURASmi. L. J. Jgehtrdm, 1889. Geol. FOr. FOrh., xi., 891 
(Pleurasit), f. nXevpa, 'side/ because it forms a band by the side of arsenio- 
pleite. An arsenide of manganese not yet fully analyzed. 

FLEUROOLASB. A. Breithaupt, 1828, Breit. Char., 60 (Pleuro- 
klas), f. nXevpa, ' side/ and KXdr, * to cleave/ because its easiest cleavage 
is prismatic. An obs. syn. of wagnerite. 

PIiINIAN. A. BreUhaupt, 1846. Fogg. Ann.. Ixix. 480, in honor of 
Fliny. A syn. of arsenopyrite, the new name being given because it 
was supposed to be monoclinic. 

PUNTUITB. T, Thomson, 1886. Thom. Min., i, 828, f. nXirBoi, *a 
brick,' alluding to its color. A brick- red clay from Ireland. 

PLOMBC^OBABIB. See plumbogummite 

PI/)MBIBRITB. G. A. Dauhree, 1858, Ann. des M., 5th, xiii. 245. 
f. Flombidres, France, its locality. Hydrous silicate of calcium, a gela- 
tinous substance which hardens on exposure to the air. 

FIjUMBAC^O. From plumbum, ' lead.' Used first as the name 
of an artificial product from lead ore; later for the ore itself (galena), and 
also for graphite, of which it is now a synonym. 

FLUBffBAIiLOPHANB. L. Bombicci, [1868, Soc. It Kat Atti. ix}, 
1868, Jahrb. Min.. 750. A var. of allophane containing a little lead, 
hence the name. 

PLX7MBBINB. A. Breithaupt, 1868, Berg. Hat., xxii, 86 (PlumbeTn), 
f. 'plumbum,' lead. Galena, crystallized in hexagonal prisms, which 
are generally regarded as pseudomorphs after pyromorphite. 

FliUMBIODITB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 67, f. its composi- 
tion. An obs. syn. of schwartzembergite. 

PliUMfiOBINNrrB. A, WeUbach, 1880, Weis. Char., 42 (Plum- 
bobinnit), f. its composition and its locality, the Binnenthal, Switzerland. 
A syn. of dufrenoysite. 

PIinBCBOOAI.OrrB. /. F. W. JohmUm, 1829. £d. Phil. Jour., vi. 
79, f. its composition. A var. of calcite containing varying proportions 
of lead carbonate. 

FLX7MBOOX7PRITB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab. , 56. A vari- 
ant of cuproplumbite. 

PLUMBOFBRRITB. L, J. IgeUtrdm, 1881, Yet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., 
xzxviii, (8), 27 (Plumboferrit), f. its composition. Ferrous and ferric 



PLXTMBOaXTBSMITB 214 POLTADBLPHITB 

oxides ^ilb lead oxide, black in color and having a red streak like 
hematite. 

PLUMBOGUMMITB. OUletde Laumont, 1819, Bei*z. Nouv. Syst., 
283 (Plomh-gomme), f. its composition and appearance. Hydrous 
pbospbo alumiunte of lend, having a gum-like lustre. 

PLUMBOMANGANITB. /. B. Hannay, 1877, Min. Mag., i, 152, 
f. its composition. An uncertain sulphide of manganese and lead. 

PliUMBONAORITXI. M. F. HeddU, 1889. Min. Mag., viii, 203, f. 
plumbum, ' lead,' and nacre, alluding to its composition and lustre. A 
syn. of bydrocerussite. 

PLUMBORXSSINITE. /. D. Dana, 1837, Dana Min., 280, f. ite 
composition and lustre. An obs. syn. of plumbogummite. 

PLUBffBOSTANNITB. A. Raimondi, 1878, Min. P6rou, 187. be- 
cause it contains lead and tin. Sulph-antimonide of tin, lead and iron. 

PliUBCBOSTIBNmi. A. Breithaupt, 1887. Jour. Pk. Ch., x, 442 
(Plumbostib), because it contains lead and antimony. An obs. syn. of 
boulangerite. 

PliUMOSB ANTIMONT. An early name for jamesonite, which 
had been called feather-ore. 

PLUMOSrrXI. W, Hdidinger, 1846, Haid. Handb., 569 (Plumosit), 
f . pluma, ' a feather,' from its older name, Federerz. A syn. of jame- 
flonite. 

PLUSH-OOPPER. A ComiBh name for chalcotrichite, probably 
alluding to its appearance. 

POIEIUTB. Contracted from poikilopyrite. 

POIKIIiOPTRITB. E, F. Qlocker, 1839, Glock. Min., 828, f. 
leotKiXo?, ' variegated,' alluding to its color, and pyrite. An obs. syn. 
of bomite. 

POLIANTTB. A, BreUhaupt, 1844, Pogg. Ann., Ixi, 191 (Polianit). 
said to be from noXtavoi (probably an error for no\t6%), ' gray.* alluding 
to its color. Manganese dioxide, found in iron-gray, tetragonal crystals. 

POIXUOITE. J, D, Dana, 1868. Dana Min., 249, f. A. Breithavpf8 
Pollux, 1846, Pogg. Ann., Ixix, 439, after Pollux, an associated mineral 
being named Castor, because the two occur together and resemble each 
other. Silicate of aluminum and csesium, found in brilliant, colorless 
crystals. 

POIiliUX. See pollucite. 

POLTADBLPHINB. Variant of polyadelphite. 

POLTADELPHITE. T. Thonuon, 1886, Thom. Min., i, 154, f. roXvS, 
'many,' and ddeXtpd?, * brother,' because it consists of five different 
silicrttes united. A brownish-yellow garnet from Franklin. N. J. 



POLTARGITB 216 POLTLTTHIONmi 

POLTARGITB. Z. F. Smnberg. 1840, Vet. Ak. Stock., 164 (Poly- 
argit), f. noXvS, 'much/ and a^ytWoS, 'clay,' because it contains much 
alumina. An altered anorthite, clashed under pinite. 

FOLTARGTRITB. F. v. Sandberger, 1869, Jahrb. Min..810(Poly- 
argyrit), f. noXt)s, *much,' and apyvpoi, 'silver,' because of its high 
percentage of silver. Sulph-antimonide ot silver, of iron-black color 
and metallic lustre. 

POLTARSBNim. L. J. JgeUtrOm, 1885. Bull. Soc. Min.. viii, 869, 
f. noXvi, 'much,' and arsenic, because it contains so much arsenic acid. 
A syn. of sarkinite. 

POIiTBASTTB. H, Rose, 1829, Pogg. Ann., xv, 673 (Poly basil), f. 
)roA.i5$, 'much,* and fidai^, * base,' in allusion to the large amount of the 
base, sulphuret of silver, as compared with the acids, sulphurets of arsenic 
and antimony. Sulph-antimonide of silver and copper, found in iron- 
black crystals. 

POIiTOHROnJTB. P. a Weibye, 1846. Jahrb. Min., 289 (Poly- 
chroilith), f. noXvS, 'many,' XPotd, 'color,' and Xi^oi, An alteration 
product of iolite, found of several colors. 

POLTOHROITB. Variant of poly chroi lite. 

POIiYOHROMS. /. F, L. Hausmann, 1818, Haus. Min., 1089 
(Polychrom), f. >roA.i55, 'many,' and ;rpa5//a, 'color,' because it is found 
of several different colors. An obs. syn. of pyromorphite. 

POIiTORASE. Th. 8eheerer, 1844. Pogg. Ann., Ixii. 480 (Polykras). 
f. noXviy 'many,' and KfjiiatS, ' a mixture,' on account of its many con- 
stituents. Columbate and titanate of yttrium and other bases. 

POIiTDTSnTB. H, Lanpeyres, 1876, Jour. Pk. Ch , xiv, 897 (Poly- 
dymit). f. noXtSs, 'many,' and 8i8v/io?, * twin,' alluding to its usual 
occurrence in poly synthetic twins. Sulphide of nickel, of a light gray 
color and metallic lustre. 

POIiTHAIJTB. Fr. Stromeyer, 1818, GOtt. Ges. Anz., (8), 2081 
(Polyhalit). f. noXi5i, 'many,' and aA$, 'salt,' because so many salts enter 
into its composition. Hydrous sulphate of calcium, magnesium and 
potassium, found in red or yellowish mosses. 

POIiTHAIiUTE. Error for polyhalite. 

POLYHTDRTTB. A. Breithaupt, 1841. Breit. Handb., ii, 884 (Poly- 
hydrit). f. itoXv%, ' much/ and vSoop, ' water.' A hydrous silicate of 
iron, containing nearly thirty per cent of water, whence its name. 

POIiTLTTB. T, Thomson, 1886, Thorn. Min., i, 495, f. noXv?, 
'many/ because it contains so many constituents, and AzOoS. A black 
var. of pyroxene near hudsonite. 

POIiTLZTHIONITB. J, Lorenwen, 1884, Zt. Eryst., iz, 251 (Poly- 



POIiTMIGNrm 216 POSEPNTTB 

lithioDit), f. noXv^ 'much/ and litbioD, because It contains so much 
lithium. A var. of ziunwaldite, containing about nine per cent of 
lithium. 

POLTMIGNITE. J. J. Berzelius, 1824, Vet. Ak. Stock., 838 (Poly- 
mignit), f. noXvS, * many/ and jityvTuvai^ * to mix,' from the multiplicity 
of its elemen ts. Columbo-titanate and zirconate of cerium and other bases. 

POIiTSPHJERTTE. A. Breiihaupt, 1832, Breit. Char., 64 (Poly- 
spbarit), f. TCoXvS, 'many,' and (r<paifjd, *a ball/ alluding to its shape. 
A var. of pyromorphite, usually found in globular and mamillary forms. 

POIiTTELTTE. E. F. Olocker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 31 (Polytelit). f. 
TCoXvreXTfs, 'very valuable,' because a rich silver ore. A somewhat 
uncertain ore of lead, silver, antimony and sulphur, perhaps an antimonial 
tetrahedrite. 

F. V. Kobell, 1853, Kob. Taf., 10, uses it as a syn. of freibergite. 

POLTXEN. J, F, Z. Bausmann, 1813, Haus. Min., i, 97, f. 
noXv^evoS, 'entertaining many guests,' because so many other metals 
occur with it. An obs. syn. of platinum. 

POONALITE. H. J, Brooke, 1831, Phil. Mag., 2d, x, 109, f. Poonah, 
India, its locality. A syn. of scolecite. 

POROEIjAIN-OIjAT. An early name of kaolinite, on account of its 
use in tbe manufacture of porcelain. 

POROELAIN-EARTH. Syn. of porcelain-clay. 

POROELAIN^ASPER. A. O. Werntr, 1789, Berg. Jour., i, 875 
(Porzellanjaspis), f. its appearance. A bard, naturally-baked clay, long 
considered a var. of jasper. 

POROEIiAIN-SPAR. /. N. FucJis, 1818, K. Ak. MQnch. Denk., 
vii, 67 (Porzellanspatb), because it is the mineral from which porcelain 
earth (kaolin) was produced by alteration. An obs. syn. of passauite. 

POROEIiliANTTE. J, T, A, Peiihner, 1794, Kirw. Min., i, 813, 
A name suggested for porcelain jasper to prevent confusing it with genuine 
jasper. 

Also a syn. of porcelain-spar. 

POROEIiliOPHITE. /. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 464, because It 
is a porcellanous var. of serpentine (ophite). 

PORPEZITE. J. D. Dana, 1850. Dana Min., 550, f. Porpez, Bi-azO, 
its locality. A var. of gold, containing palladium. 

PORTITE. J. Meneghini and E, Bechi, 1852, A. J. S., 2d, xiv, 63, 
in honor of Louis Porte. A white, clay-like mineral, found in radiated 
masses with a very distinct cleavage. 

PORZELLANITE. Variant of porcellanite (porcelain spar). 

POSEPNYTB. J. V. Schrockinger, 1877, Geol. Reich. Verb., 128 



POTASH ALUM 217 PRBBNTTOID 

(Posepnyt), after P. Posepny, who discovered it. An oxygenated hydro- 
carbon, found in plates and nodules of a light green color. 

POTASH AliUM. See kalinite. 

POTASH FSIiDSPAR. See orthoclase. 

POTSTONB. /. Q, Wallerius, 1747, Wall. Min.. 184, (Lapis ollaris). 
alluding to its use in the manufacture of pots. A syn. of steatite. 

POTTBRS' ORB. An early name for galena, because used for glazing 
potlery. 

POUOHSINITB. See puschkibite. 

POUSOHKINITB. Variant of puschkinite. 

POWELIilTB. W, H, MeltilU, 1891, A. J. S.. 8d, xli, 188, in honor 
of Maj. J. W. Powell. Molybdate of calcium, containing also calcium 
tungstate, of yellow color and resinous lustre'. 

PRASB. From npaaov, * leek, ' in allusion to its color. A very old 
name for a leek-green var. of translucent quartz. 

PRASBM. Variant of prase. 

PRASBOLTTB. A, Erdmann, 1840, Vet. Ak. Stock., 181 (Praseo- 
lith). f. npdaov, " leek,' in allusion to its color, and XiBo^. An alteration 
product, of a light green or dark green color. 

PRASINOHALZTTB. See prasine. 

PRASINB. A, BreWiaupU 1841, Breit. Handb., ii. 167 (Prasin). f. 
lepaaivos, * leek-green,* alluding to its color. Probably from his earlier 
generic name, Prasiuchalzit, 1880, Breit. Uib., 10. A syn. of pseudo- 
malachite. 

PRASOOHROBSB. X Landerer, 1850, Jahrb. Min., 682 (Praso- 
chrom), f . npdaov, * leek,' and Xfi(2^a, * color.' A dull-green incrustation 
on chromic iron, probably calcite colored by oxide of chromium. 

PRA80UTB. T. TJiOfMon, 1840, Phil. Mag., 8d, xvU, 416, f. 
npciaov, ' leek,' in allusion to its color, and XiBoS. A leek-green, fibrous 
mineral, probably a var. of chlorite. 

PRBDAZZTTB. O, P. A. PeUiholdt, [1848, Beit, zur Oeogn. von 
Tyrol, IW], 1845, Haid. Ueb. for 1848, 22 (Predazzit), f. Predazzo, Tyrol, 
its locality. A rock composed of calcite and brucite, long considered a 
mineral species. 

PRBGRATTTTB. L, Liebener, 1862. Kenng. Ueb. for 1861, 58(Pre. 
grattit), f. Pregratten, Tyrol, Its locality. A syn. of paragouite. 

PRBHNTTB. A, Q, Werner, 1789, Berg. Jour., i, 875 (Prehnit), 
announced 1788, see 1790, Berg. Jour., 1, 107, after Col. von Prehn, who 
brought it from the Cape of Oood Hope. Hydrous silicate of aluminum 
and calcium, found usually in greenish aggregations of tabular crystals. 

PRBHNITOn>. a W, BlofMtrand, 1854, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., 



PREUNNERmi 218 PROTONONTRONITIS 

xi. 299, f. prebnite and eldo^, 'like/ on account of its resemblance to 
prehnite. A var. of dipyre closely resembling prebnite. 

PREUNNERTTE. Error for prunnerite. 

PRIBRAMITE. Variant of przibramite. 

PRIOEITB. B. SUltman, Jr., 1878. A. J. S., 3d, vi, 128. in honor 
of Thomas Price, of San Francisco. Hydrous borate of calcium, near 
colciiiuiiite. 

PRISMATINE. A. 8auer, 1886, Zt. Geol., xxviii, 704 (Prismatin), 
f. tbe prismatic form of its ciystals. A syn. of kornerupine. 

PRIXTTE. A. Lepmerie, 1859, Ley. Min., ii, 284, f. St. Prix, 
France, its locality. Said to be bydrated lead araenate, but probably 
onl}' mimetite. 

PROOHLORTTE. J, D, Dana, 1867, A. J. 8.. 2d, xliv, 258. f. Ttpi, 
* before.' and cblorite, because it was tbe earliest var. of cblorite distin- 
guished, chlorite being now considered a group name. 

PROIDONITE. A. Scacchi, 1873. Nap. Ac. Atti, vi, 65 (Proidonina), 
f. TCfjoeidoy, ' to foresee,* its occurrence having been foreseen in llic earlier 
discovery of fluorbydric acid gas. Silicon fluoride; one of il e many 
gases observed in tbe exhalations of Vesuvius. 

PROLBOTTTE. H. Sjogren, 1894, (1895), SJ5g. Cont. Min., (2). 125 
(Prolectit), f. npoXeyeiv, 'to foretell.' because tbe existence of a mineral 
of its composition had been predicted. A member of the humite group, 
differing from tbe others in optical and crystal lographic characters. 

PROSOPITIf. Th. ScJieerer, 1853. Pogg. Ann., xc. 315 (Prosopit). f. 
itpo(Ta)7t€iov, *a mask.' because so deceptive in character. Hydrous 
fluoride of aluminum and calcium. 

PROTHEITE. G. v. Razoumofaki, 1827. Bull. Sci. Nat., xl. 42 
(ProtbeeYte), f. Protbeus (IlpoorevS), on account of its varying appearance. 
A dark green var. of pyroxene. 

PROTHERITE. Error for protbeite. 

PROTOBASTITE. A, Streng, 1861, Zt. Geol., xiii, 71 (Protobastit), 
f. 7cp<3roS .'earlier,' and bastite, because bastite is derived from it by 
alteration. A syn. of enstatite. 

PROTOLITHIONITE. F. v. Sandberger, 1885, Sand. Unt. Erz., 169 
(Protolitbionit). f. TtpooroS, * first,' and litbionite, because considered the 
oldest litbia mica. A lithium mica near zinnwaldite. 

PROTONONTRONTTE. A. Knop, [1888, Oberrh. Geol. Ver., 18], 
Zt. Kryst., xviii, 668 (Protonontronit), f. npooToi, ' first,' and nontronite, 
perhaps because thought to be tbe mineral from which nontronite has been 
formed. An uncertain silicate of magnesium, of leek-green color, found 
filling amygdaloidal cavities. 



PROTOVERMIOnLITB 219 PSBUDOBROOEITfi 

PROTOVBRMICULITB. G. A. Koenig, 1877. Acad. Nat. Sci. 
Proc, 269, f. frpcDToS, 'earlier.' and vermiculite, because, as it contaiDS 
less water and consequently exfoliates less tbau other vermiculites, it may 
be considered less altered, and therefore earlier, than the others. A 
micaceous mineral of yellowish color, near vermiculite. 

FROUSTTTB. F. S. Beudani, 1833, Beud Miu., ii, 445, after Prof. 
J. L. Proust, who had first noticed it. Sulph-arsenide of silver, found 
in crystals of a brilliant red color. 

PRUNNERITE. J. Esmark, 1880, Jahrb. Min., 71 (Prunnerit), in 

honor of Pruuner, a naturalist of Cagliari, Italy. An obs. name for 

a violet colored var. of calcite, resembling chalcedony. 

PRZIBRAMITE. B. F. Olocker, 1831. Glock. Min.. 549 (Przibra- 
mit). f . Przibram, Bohemia, its locality. The var. of gcethite having a 
velvety surface. 

Also used by J. J. N, Huot, 1841, Huot Min., i, 298, for the cadmif- 
erous var. of sphalerite. 

PSATHTRTTE. E, F, Olocker, 1847. Glock. Syn., 8 (Psathyritc). f. 
ifdBupoi, * friable,* because so easily pulverized. An obs. syn. of 
zyloretinite. 

PSATUROSE. F 8. Beudant, 1832. Beud. Min., 482, f. i/fdOvpo^, 
'fragile,' alluding to its characteristic property. An obs. syn. of 
Btephanite. 

PSEUDOAIiBITE. J, D, Dana, 1844, Dana Min.. 353, f. its resem- 
blance to albite. A syn. of andesite. 

PSEUDO-ANDALU^ITE. E. J. Chapman, 1843, Chap. Min.. 77. 
A provisional name for large crystals of cyanite, which have the form of 
andalusite. 

PSEUDOAPATTTE. A. Breit/iaupt, 1837. Glock. Jahres. for 1835, 
217 (Pseudoapatit). Hexagonal crystals, at first considered pseudomor- 
phous after apatite, but now considered to be after pyromorphite. 

PSEUDOBERZEUITE. F. Lindgren, 1884 Gcol. Fdr. F5rh.. vii, 
298 (Pseudoberzeliit). f. jpevSifi, 'false,' and bcrzeliite, because not berze- 
Hite, though similar to it. An arsenate of calcium and magnesium near 
bcrzeliite, but differing in optical properties. 

PSEUDOBIOTTTE. A. Kw)p, 1887. Zt. Kryst., xii, 607 (Pseudo- 
biotit), f. i?€v8i}?, * false,' and biotite. because not biotite though similar to 
it. An altered biotite with more than ten per cent of water. 

PSEUDOBROOEITE. A. Koch, 1878, Min. Mitth., i. 77 (Pseudo- 
brookit). f. i/fevSij^, * false/ and brookite. because not brookitc though 
similar to it. Oxide of titanium and iron, found in minute orthorhombic 
crystals. 



PS&UDOOOTUNMITil 220 PB&UDOSMARAaDITE 

PSEUDOOOTUNNTTB. A, Scacchi, 1873, Nap. Ac. Atti, vi, 40 
(PseudocotunDiu), f. if€v6rfi, * false,' and cotunuite, because not cotunnite 
though resembling it. An uncertain chloride of lead and potassium. 

PSBUDO-BMERAU). See pseudosmaragdite. 

PSBUDOGALBNA. J. Q. WcUlenus, 1747. Wall. Min., 248, f. 
if€v8ij^t 'false,' and galena, because not galena though resembling it. 
An obs. name for sphulerite. 

PSEUDOIiBUOITE. J. F, Williams, 1890, Geol. Surv. Ark., ii» 
267, f. its resemblance to leucite. Crystals consisting of elseolite and 
orthoclase, having the form of leucite and perhaps the result of its 
alteration. 

PSEUDOUBETHENITE. C. F. Rammelsberg, 1860, Ramm. Min. 
Ch., 844 (Pseudolibethenit), f. ipevSt}?, 'false,' and libethenite. A name 
given to a var. of libethenite which contains a larger percentage of water 
Ihan usual. 

PSEUDOLTTE. S, Fowler, 1825, A. J. S., ix, 244, f. its affinity %o 
other pseudomorphous crystals, and XiOoS, An obs. name for octahedral 
pseudomorphs of talc after spinel. 

PSEUDOMALAOHITE. J, F. L, Havsmann, 1818, Haus. Min., 
iii, 1085 (Pseudomulachit), f. tpevSiji, 'false,' and malachite, because not 
malachite though resembling it. Hydrous phosphate of copper, found 
in dark green masses. 

PSEUDONATROUTE. O. Oratiarola, 1879, Soc. Tosc. Atti, iv, 
229, f. ip€v5i}i, 'false,' and natrolite. Hydrous silicate of aluminum 
and calcium, at first described as natrolite, but later found to differ from 
it very much. 

PSEUDONEPHEUNE. Fl, Belleme, 1800, Jour, de Phys., U, 458, 
because though it resembles nepheline it should be distinguished from it. 
The nepheline from Capo di Bove, Italy, long went under this name. 

PSEUDONOOERINA. A. Seaeclii. 1889, Nap. Ac. Atti. ii. 69, f. 
^€v8t}'9, ' false,' and nocerina (nocerite). An uncertain mineral, in white 
Acicular crystals, resembling nocerite, 

PSEUDOPHITE. A, Kenngott, 1855. K. Ak. Wien. xvi, 170 
{Pseudophit), f. tpevdifi, ' false,' and ophite, because not ophite (serpen- 
tine) though resembling it. A var. of loganite, resembling serpentine. 

PSEUDOSOAPOLITE. iT. Wardenskidld, 1820, Nord. Bid rag., 66 
<Pseudoscapolit). Large crystals of pyroxene, pseudomorphous after 
scapolite. 

PSEUDOSMARAGDITE. /. J. Berzelius, 1815. Aph. i Fis., iv, 174 
(Pseudosmaragd). At first applied to what were considered pseudomor- 
phous crystals of smaragd (emerald). A. Atterberg has recently, 1876, 



F8BUD080BSBCITB 231 PURPLB BLENDB 

Oeol. FOr. FOrh., ii, 405, applied the same name to the hard part of similar 
crystals, which he fiuds are not true beryl. 

• P8BUD080BSBCITB. FL Bellevue, 1800, Jour, de Phys.. li, 458. 
because, though considered near sommite, it nevertheless deserved a distin- 
guishing name. A syn. of pseudonepheline. 

PSEXTDOSTSATITE. M. Binneymd M. Thornton, 1808, £d. Phys. 
8oc., ii (1859-68), 445, f. its resemblance to steatite. An impure var. of 
halloysite, of a dark-green color. 

PSBUDOTRIDTfiOTB. E. Mallard, 1890, Bull. Soc. Min., xiii, 
162, f. i>ev8rfi, ' false,' and tridymite, because though like tridymite in 
form it agrees with quartz in specific gravity and optical properties. 

FSBXTDOTRIPLm]. J. R. Blum, 1845, Blum Min., 587 (Pseudo- 
triplit), f. i?€v8r}i, * false, and tripHte, because not (riplite though re- 
sembling it. An incrustation on triphylite resulting from its alteration. 

PSIIiOMSIiANB. W. Haidinger, 1828 (read 1827. Roy. Soc. Ed.). 
Ed. Jour. Sci., ix, 805, f. ^«Ao?, 'smooth,' and //^Ad5. -dvo^, * black,' in 
allusion to its appearance. Hydrous oxide of manganese, found often in 
botryoidal and stalactitic shAjies. 

PSIMYTHITB. E, F, Glocker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 256 (Psimythit), 
f. i>iiix:Oo%, 'white lead,' from its composition. An obs. syn. of lead- 
hUlite. 

PSTTTAOINITB. F. A. Genth, 1876. A. J. 8., 8d. xii, 85, f. psit- 
tadnus, ' parrot-green,' from its color. Hydrous vanadate of lead and 
copper, occurring as a pulverulent coating on quartz. 

PTEROUTB. A. BreWiaupt, 1865. Berg. Hat., xxiv, 886 (Ptero- 
lith), f. nrepov, 'a feather,' alluding to its form, and A/OoS. An 
altered lepidomelane. found in fan shaped or feather-shaped aggrega- 
tions. 

PTHiOUTB. W. Gross and L. G. Eakins, 1886. A. J. S., 8d, xxxii, 
117. f. nriXoY^ 'down,' 'in reference to the light, downy nature of its 
aggregates,' and AiT^o?. Hydrous silicate of aluminum, calcium and 
potassium, found in delicate tufts made up of short, capillary crystals. 

PUOHBBITB. A. Premel, 1871, Jour. Pk. Ch., iv. 227 (Pucherit). 
f. the Pucher mine, Schneeberg, Saxony, its locality. Vanadate of 
bismuth, occurring in reddish-brown crystals of a brilliant lustre. 

PUFIiBRTTB. F. Bukeisen, 1857. K. Ak. Wieu, xxiv. 286 (Puf- 
lerit), f. Puflerloch. Tyrol, its locality. A var. of stilbite containing no 
alkalies. 

PUNAHUTB. Variant of poonalite. * 

PURPLB BLBNDB. F. MoJts. 1820, Mohs Char.. 92. in allusion 
to its color. An obs. syn. of kermesite. 



PURPIiB OOPPBR 222 PTRTTB 

PURPLB COPPER. R. Kirwan, 1796, Kirw. Min., ii, 888 (Purple 
Copper Ore), alluding to its prevailing color. A syn. of bornile. 

PUSOHKINITE. Peter Wagner, 1841, Soc. Nat. Mosc. Bull., 113 

(Pouchkinit), in honor of Poucbkin, curator at the University of 

Kazan. An emerald -green var. of epidote from the Urals. 

PYONITB. R. J. Hauy, 1801, Hatty Min.. iii, 168, f. nvKroi, 
' dense,' because it has a higher specific gravity than beryl. A var. of 
topaz, occurring in columnar aggregations. 

PYONOTROPB. A. Breithaupt, 1882, Breit. Char., 110 (Pyknotrop), 
perhaps f. TtvKvoi and rpoTtci, * of compact guise,* alluding to its ap- 
pearance. A compact mineral near serpentine, probably an alteration 
product. 

PYRAIiLOLTTB. N. Mrdenskiold, 1820, Jour. Ch. Ph., xxxi, 889 
(Pyrallolith), f. nvft, 'fire,' and aAAoS, 'different,' because it changes 
color when heated, and XtBoS, An alteration product of pyroxene, from 
Finland. 

PYRANTIMONITB. E. F. Olocker, 1881, Glock. Min., 892 (Pyr- 
antiraonit), probably f. its fire- red color and its composition. An obs. 
syn. of kermesite. 

PYRARGILUTB. K Nardenskiold, 1838, Berz. Jahres., xii, 174 
(Pyrargillit), f. nvfj, * fire,* and apyiWo'i, • clay,* because it smells like 
clay when heated. One of the uncertain alteration products of iolite. 

PTRARGTRTTB. E, F. Olocker, 1831, Glock. Min., 888 (Pyrargy- 
rit), f. nvp, *fire,' and dpyvpd?, 'silver,* alluding to its color and com- 
position. Sulph-antimonide of silver, often called dark red silver 
ore. 

PYRAUZTTB. A, Breithaupt, 1841, Breit. Handb., ii, 897 (Pyrauxit), 
f. TCvpf * fire,' and av^rj* * growth,* because it enlarges when heated. An 
obs. syn. of pyrophyllite. 

PYRBNBITB. A. G. Werner, 1812, Hoff. Min., ii, (1), 871 (Pyreneit), 
f . the Pyrenees, where it was found. A grayish-black var. of garnet^ 
classed under andradite. 

PYROOM. A. BreithaupU 1830, Breit. Uib., 86, probably f. 
TCvpyooMcr, ' having towers,* alluding to the grouping of its crystals. A 
syn. of fassaite. 

PTRIOHROLITB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 60, probably f. 

nvpt-xfioo^f * fire-colored,* in allusion to its color, and XiBoi, A syn. of 
pyrostilpnite. 

PYRITB. Dioscorades, about 50, Dioscor., Lib. v. Cap. 148, 884 
(UvpiTT;?), f. Ttvp, * fire,' because a stone which strikes fire with steel. The 
name included at first both copper and iron pyrites ; later copper pyiitea 



PTRITB8 223 PTROBSAUTB 

was separated from it under the name chalcopyrite ; it is now only ap- 
plied to ihc disiilpliide of inm which crystallizes in isometric forms. 

PYRITES. See pyrite. 

PTRITOIiAMPRITE. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 39, f. pyrites 

and XajjTepo? * shining,' from its appearance. A syn. of arsenic silver. 
FTROAURITII. X. /. Tgelstrom, 1865, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., xxii, 

608 (Pyroaui-it), f. levp, -o5, * fire,* and auruni, * gold,' because it looks like 
gold after being heated. Hydrate of magnesium and iron, of a pearly- 
white or golden-yellow color. 

PTROOHLORB. Fr. WohUr. 1826. Pogg. Ann., vii, 417 (Pyro- 
chlor). f. Ttvp, -«^, 'flre,' and ;fA(»;ro5, 'greenish-yellow,* because it 
becomes yellow when heated, while polymignite does not. Columbo- 
titanate of calcium, thorium and cerium, found in small, brown octahedrons. 

Microlite has sometimes been confounded with pyrochlore. 

PTROOHROrm. L. J. JgeUtram, 1864, Pogg. Ann., czxii, 181 
(Pyrochroit), f. xvp, -o5, 'fire,* and XPO^<^* 'color,* because it becomes 
colored when heated. Hydrate of manganese, pearly-white and foli- 
ated like brucite and containing some magnesium. 

PTROOHROTTTB. A. Breithaupt, 1874, Frenz. Min. Lex., 252 
(Pyrochrotit), probably f. nvpd-xpoo^t for icvpi-xpoo^, -ooroS, 'flre-colored/ 
in allusion to its color. A syn. of pyrostilpnite. 

PTROOLASTTB. C. U. Shepard, 1856, A. J. S., 2d, xxii. 97, f. 
xvp, -o?, 'fire,' and KXav, 'to break,' because it flies to pieces when 
heated. One of the various names given to hard guano. 

PTROOONrm. Fr, W6?iUr, 1875, Ann. Ch. Pharm., clxxx, 283 
(Pyrokonit), f. «vp, -oS, 'fire,' and Kovia, 'powder/ because it falls to 
pieces when ^leated. A syn. of pachnolite. 

PTRODMALTTB. See pyrosmalite. 

PTROOOMB. Error for pyrgom. 

PTROOUANITB. a U. Shepard, 1856, A. J. S., 2d, xxii, 97. f. 
nvp, -OS, ' fire,* and guano. A name for hard guano, which was erro- 
neously thought to have undergone the action of fire. 

PTROIDB8INB. C. U. Shepard, 1872, Shep. Cat. Met., 7, f. Tcvpo- 
€i6f}^, 'fire-like,' because it decrepitates when heated. A doubtful 
meteoric mineral near serpentine. 

PTROLUSITB. W. Haidinger, 1828 (read 1827, Roy. Soc. Ed.). Ed. 
Jour. Sci., ix, 808, f. nvp, -oi, 'fire.' and Xvciv, 'to wash, to do away 
with (color),' because when melted with glass it renders it colorless. 
Proto-sesquioxide of manganese, found in black, crystalline aggregations 
and massive. 

PTROBCALITB. Error for pyrosmalite. 



PTROMELANE 224 FTRORBTINITZI 

FYROMELANE. C. U. SJiepard, 1856, A. J. S , 2d. xxii. 96, f. 
nvp, -o5, 'fire,' and u^Xdi, -dvoi, 'black/ because it turns black when 
heated. A reddish mineral, probably titanite, fouDd in angular grains in 
the gold sands of North Carolina. 

PTROMEIilNE. F. v. Kobell, 1852. E. Ak. MUnch. Anz.. zxxv, 
215 (Pyromelin), f. nvp, -o5. 'flre/ and juifXivoS, 'yellow,* because it 
turns yellow when heated. A syn. of morenosite. 

PYROMORPHTTB. J. F. L. Hausmann. 1813. Haus. Min., iu, 1090 
(Pyromorphit), f. nvp, -o5, 'fire,' and fiopipr/, *form,' because the globule 
produced by melting a fragment assumes a crystalline shape on cooling. 
Chloro-phosphate of lead, found in green, yellow and brown crystals. 

PTROPB. A. O. Werner, 1803, Ludw. Min., i, 48 (Pyrop), f. 
7cvpa)7c6?, * fiery,' in allusion to its fire-red color. A red var. of garnet^ 
commonly called Bohemian garnet. 

PTROPHANE. From nvp, -o^, ' fire,' and (paivea^at, * to appear.' 
An early name for a var. of opal, which had been made to absorb melted 
wax, and consequently became translucent when heated. 

Also sometimes applied to fire opal. 

PTROPHANTTE. A. Hamberg, 1890, Geol. POr. POrb. xii. 598 
(Pyrophanil), f. nvp, -o5, •fire,' and (pcxvoi, 'bright,* from its color and 
lustre. Titanate of manganese, found in brilliant, red, tabular crystals 
and scales. 

PYROFHOSPHORITE. C. U. Shepard, Jr., 1878, A. J. S., 8d, xv, 
49, f. its composition. A doubtful phosphate from the West Indies, 
considered a pyrophosphate of lime and magnesia. 

PTROPHTIiLTTE. R. Hermann, 1829, Pogg. Ann., xv. 592 (Pyro- 
phyllit), f. nvpt -o5, 'fire,' and (pvXXov, 'a leaf,' because it exfoliates 
when heated. Hydrous silicate of aluminum, found in radiated folia, 
often resembling talc. 

PTROPHYSAIiITE. TT. Hmnger and J. J. Bereelius, 1806. Afh. 1 
Pis., i, 111, f. jrt5/0, -o5, *fire,' and <pv<TaXt5 for (pvaaXXt?, *a bladder,* 
because it intumesces when heated. A coarse and nearly opaque var. 
of topaz. 

PTROFIS8ITE. A. KenngoU, 1858, Kenng. Ueb. for 1850-51, 148 
(Pyropissit), f. rrvp, -o?, 'fire,' and Ttzaaa, * pitch,' because it melts to a 
pitch- like mass. A mixture of hydrocarbons, occurring as a grayish- 
brown, earthy mass. 

PYRORETIN. See pyroretinite. 

PYRORETINITE. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 744, f. A, E, ReustT 
earlier name Pyroretin, 1854, K. Ak. Wien, xii, 551, f. nvpj -o^, 'fire,* 
and ftrfTivtf, ' resin,' because formed from brown coal by the heat of a 



225 

▼olcanic dyke. The part of pyroretin which dissolves in hot alcohol and 
deposits on cooling. 

FTRORTHrm. J. J. Berzelius, 1818, Afh. i Fis.. ▼. 52 (Pyrorthit), 
f. Tcvp, -oS, 'fire/ and orthite, because an orthite which burns when 
heated. An altered orthite-like mineral, containing carboitHceous matter. 

PTROSOLZSRITB F. v. Kobell, 1884, Jour. Pk. Ch.. ii, 53 (Pyro- 
sklerit), f. JTvp, -o5, 'fire/ and aKXpfloi, *hard/ becjiuse a fragment 
becomes very hard when heated before the blowpipe. A micaceous 
mineral, one of the uncertain alteration products classed with vermiculite. 

PTR08IDZ3RITB. See pyrrhosiderite. 

PTR08MAUTB. J. F. L. Hauamann, 1808, Moll. Jahrb. Efem., 
iv, 890 (Pirodmalit), f. nvp, oS, ' fire/ and od;idAeo5. ' stinking.* in allu- 
sion to the strong odor it gives off when heated. Written pyrosmalite by 
D. L, 0. Karsten, 1808, Karst. Tab., 108, f. nvp, -o5, oafii}, *odor, and 
X{Boi.' Chlorosilicate of iron and manganese, found in greenish-black or 

brown crystals. 

PTR08TIBITB. E. F. Qloeker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 16 (Pyrostibit), 

probably f. nvp, .o$, 'fire,' and stibium, ' antimony,' aliuding to its color 

and composition. An obs. syn. of kermesite. 

PYROSTHiPNITII. J. Z>. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 98, f. nvp, -o$, 
' fire.' and artXfCvdi, ' shining,' in allusion to its fire-like color. Sulph- 
antimonide of silver, found in small, brilliant, red crystals. 

PTROTBOHNrm. A. Scacchi, 1865, Scac. Vesuv., 187. An 
obs. syn. of thenardite. 

PTROZENZ3. R J. Hauy, 1796. Jour, des M.. ▼, 269, f. nvp, -o$. 
' fire,' and ^evo^, * a stranger,' because he thought it was not in its native 
place among igneous rocks. A group of complex silicates, occurring In 
monoclinic crystals with a prismatic angle of about 90"*. 

PTRRHARSBNTTB. Variant of pjrrrhoarsenite. 

PTRRHTTB. O. Ro$e, 1840, Pogg. Ann., xlviii, 562 (Pyrrhit), f. 
TTvppoi, 'flame-colored,' from its color. Small, orange red, octahedral 
crystals, not fully examined. Probably a columbate near pyrochlore. 

PTRRHOARSENmi. L, J. IgeUtrom, 1886, Bull. Soc. Min.. ix, 
218, f. itvppoi, 'flame-colored,* and arsenic, alluding to its color and com- 
position. An orange-red var. of berzeliite. 

PTRRHOLITB. A, Des Claieeaux, 1862. Des CI. Min., i. 802. f. 
nvppoi, * flame-colored.' in allusion to its color, and A]!9o?,. An alterar 
tion product near polyargite. 

PTRRH08IDBRITE. J. C. Xfllmann, 1818, Haus. Min., i, 268 
(Pyrosiderit), f. fcvppoi, 'flame colored,' and aiBtfpoi, 'iron.' alluding to 
its color and composition. A syn. of gcethite. 



PTRRHOTINE 226 RAXMONDITZS 



A. Breithaupt, 1835, Jour. Pk. Ch., iv, 265 (Pyr- 
rotin), f. nvppoTT/?, 'redness,' alluding to the liveliness of its color. 
Changed to pyrrhotlte by J, D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 58. Sulphide 
of iron, crystallizing in the hexagonal system, and identical in composition 
with the artificial compound. 

PTRRHOTTTZS. See pyrrhotine. 

QUARTZ. G, Agrieola, 1529. Agric, 451 (Quartzum). An old 
German word of uncertain derivation. Silicic acid in its various forms, 
including rock crystal, amethyst, agate, etc. 

QUARTZI^'B. A. Micliel'Levy and Munier-Chalmas, 1892, Bull. 

Soc. Min., XV, 166, f. its close relationship to quartz. A fibrous kind of 
silica, found with chalcedony and lutecite in certain spherulites. 

QUARTZim. Variant of quartz. 

QUBNSTZSDTTTZS. G. Linck, 1888. Jahrb. Min., i, 213 (Quen- 
stedtit), in honor of Prof. F. A. v. Quenstedt. Hydrous sulphate of 
iron, found in reddish-violet crystals resembling gypsum. 

QUBTBNITB. A. Frenzel, 1890, Min. Mitth.. xi, 217 (Quetenit), f. 
Quetena, Chili, its locality. Hydrous sulphate of iron and iimguesium, 
found in reddish-brown masses. 

QUIOKSELVBR. The common name for mercury. 

QUINOITB. P. Berthier, 1825, Ann. des M.. x, 273 (Quincyte). f. 
Quiney, France, its locality. Hydrous silicate of magnesium and iron, 
occurring in carmine-red particles disseminated through limestone. 

QX7INCTTB. See quincite. 

RABDIONTTB. F. v. Kobell, 1870, E. Ak. MUnch., 46 (Rabdionit), 
f. pafidtov, 'a little rod,' because found in stalactitic, rod-like forms. 
Hydrate of copper, manganese, cobalt and iron, near asbolite. 

RABDOFHANB. Bee rhabdophane. 

RADANITB. A. BreiiJiaupt, 1866, Berg. Hat., xxv, 87 (Radanit), f. 
Radan, Harz, its locality. A compact var. of labrndorite. 

RADIATBD PYRITBS. A. G. Werner, 1789, Berg, Jour., i, 388 
(Strahlkies). The radiated var. of marcasite. 

RADIATBD ZBOLITB. A. G. Werner, 1780, Wern. Cronst., 242 
(Slrahliger Zeolith). An obs. name for stilbite. 

RADIOIilTB. J. Esmark, 1828, Jour. Ch. Ph., Hi, 861 (Radiolith), 
in allusion to its radiated structure, and Az9o?. A var. of natrolite, the 
name originally given to that found in radiated masses. 

RAHTTTB. G. U. Sliepard, 1866, A. J. S., 2d, xli, 209, after J. E. 
Raht, manager of the mine where it was found. An impure sphalerite, 
probably a mixture. 

RAIMONDITB. A. BreithaupU 1866. Berg. Hat., xxv. 149 (Rai- 



BALSTONITE 227 

mondit). after Dr. A. Raimondi, its discoverer. Hydrous sulphate of 
iron, fouud in yellow scales od cassiterite. 

RALSTONITZ3. Q. J, Brush, 1871, A. J. S., 8d. ii. 30, after Rev. J. 
O. Ralston, who first noticed it. Hydrous fluoride of sodium and alu- 
minum, found in small, colorless octahedrons on cryolite. 

RAMIRITE. M, V. de Leon, 1885. Naturalcza, vii, 65 (La Ramar- 
ita). in honor of S. Ramirez. A syu. of descloizite. 

RAMISITE. Error for ramirite. 

RAMMEIiSBEROITE. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Haudb., 560 
<Riimmelsbergit), in honor of Prof. C. F. Rammelsberg. A syn. of 
chloauthite. 

Also used by J. D. Dana, 1854, Dana Miu., 61, for the orthorhonibic 
arsenide of nickel, previously classed with chloanthite. 

RAMOSITE. N. W. Perry, 1884, E. M. Jour., xxxvii, 140. f. 
Ramos, Mexico, its locality. A doubtful silicate found among pebbles, 
perhaps only garnet. 

RANOIERTTE. A. Leymerie, 1857. Ley. Min., ii, 829, f. Mt. 
Rancier, France, its locality. A syn. of hausmannite. 

RANDANITE. See randan nite. 

RANDANNTTB. L. A. Salvetat, 1848, Ann. Ch. Phys., 8d, xxiv, 
B52 (Randanite), f. Randanne, France, its locality. A clay-like var. of 
infusorial earth. 

RANDrm. 0. A, Kaenig, 1878, Acad. Nat. 8ci. Proc., 408, after 
T. D. Rand, who analyzed it. An uncertain hydrous carbonate of 
calcium and uranium, found as a thin, yellow incrustation on granite. 

RANTTE. 8, R. PaijkuU, 1874, Deut. Ch. Ges. Ber., vii, (b), 1834 
<Rauit. error for lianit), after the Norse sea-goddess Ran. A var. of 
hydronephelite. 

RAPHANOSMrm. F, v. Kobell, 1858, Kob. Min. Nam., 87 
{Raphanosmit), f. pdipdrii, 'the radish,' and oaut}, 'odor,' because it 
gives a radish-like (horse-radish) odor when heated. An obsolete syn. of 
zorgite. 

RAFHUilTE. T. Thanuon, 1836, Thorn. Min., i. 153, f. pd<pii, *a 
needle.' alluding to its structure, and X^oi, C. U. Shepard uses the name 
Raphyllile, 1835. Shep. Min., 829, probably having received it in a private 
communication. A syn. of tremolite. 

RAPHI8IDBRITXI. A. Scacchi, 1889. Nap. Ac. Atti, iii, 12 (Rafi- 
«iderite), f. pd<p£i, 'a needle/ aud (ridprjoi, * iron,' alludiug to its structure 
and composition. Sesquioxide of iron, found in minute, acicular crystals, 
perhaps orthorhombic. 

H. How, 1889. Eg. Cat. Min., 144, from labels in the 



RAPIDOUTB 228 RED HEMATTTB 

School of Mines collection, probably f. pdtpii, 'a needle/ alluding to tbe 
sbape of its crystals. A syn. of ulexite. 

RAPIDOUTE. P. C. Abildgaard, 1800, Ann. Cbem., xxzii, lOS* 
(Rapidolitbe). f. pdyeii, -idoi, ' a rod/ from the shape of its crystals, and 
Xi^oS. An obs. syn. of wernerite. 

RASTOIiTTE. C. U. Shepard, 1857, Shep. Min. App.. p. vi. f. 
fjixo'To's, 'very easily,' and Xveiy^ * to dissolve,' because of its easy decom- 
position by acids. A hydrated biotite similar to voigtite. 

RATHOFFITB. Error for rothoffite. 

RATHOIilTB. R. P. Greg and W. G. Lettsom, 1858, G. and L. 
Min., 216, f. the Ratho quarry, near Edinburgh, Scotland, its locality, 
and AzGoS. The pectolite from the above-mentioned locality was so- 
called at first by collectors. 

RATOPBTTB. G. Fischer v. Waldheim, [1811, Jour. Unt.. ii. 74], 
1814, Ullm. Tab., 445 (Ratofkit). f. Ratofka, Russia, its locality. A 
soft, earthy var. of fluorite. 

RAUTTB. See rauite. 

RAUMTTB. R A. v. Bonsdorff, 1863. Nord. Fin. Min., 114 (Raumit), 
f. Raumo, Fiiiluiid, Trhere it was found. One of the alteration products* 
of iolite, similar to fahlunite. 

RAZOUMOFFSKIN. J. F. Jo/tn. 1814, Ann. Chem.. Ixxxviii, 108,. 
in honor of Count von RazoumoffstLi. A clay-like mineral near mont- 
morillonite, but containing less water. 

REAIjOAR. From ralij nl ghar. 'powder of the mine,' because it 
came from a silver mine. Red sulphide of arsenic, often found in mono- 
clinic prisms. 

RBCTORITE. R. N. Brackett and J. F. Williams, 1891, A. J. S., 
3d, xlii, 16. in honor of E. W. Rector, of Hot Springs, Ark. A clay- 
like mineral near kaolinite, but containing less water. 

RED ANTIMONY. A syn. of kermesite, for which it was one of 
the earliest names. 

RED ARSENIC. A syn. of realgar. 

RED CHALK. A soft ochreous var. of hematite, also called reddle 
and red ochre. 

RED COBALT. An early name for erythrite. 

RED COPPER. An early name for cuprite. 

REDDINaiTE. G, J. Brush and E. 8, Dana, 1878. A. J. S.. 3d, 
xvi, 120, f. Redding, Conn., where it was found. Hydrous phosphate 
of manganese. 

REDDLE. See red chalk. 

RED HEMATITE. A syn. of hematite. 



RBDINOTONrm 229 RBINITB 

RBDINOTONITB. O, F, Becker, 1888, Geol. Surv. U. S. Mon.. 18, 
279, f. the RediDgtou mine, Cnl., its locality. Hydrous sulphate of 
chiomium, found in purple, fibrous masses. 

RED IRON VTTRIOIi. J, J, Berzeliue, 1815, Afh. 1 Pis., iv, 307 
(Rother EiseQ-Vitriol), f. its color and composition. Ad obs. syn. of 
botryogen. 

RBO UEIAD ORB. J. 0, Walleriva, 1788, Wall. Min., ii, 800 
(Miuera plumbi rubra), f. its color and composition. A syn. of crocoite. 

RED MANOANE8E. An early name for both rhodochrosite and 
rhodonite. 

RED OOHRE. See red chalk. 

REDONDITE. 0. U. Shepard, 1869, A. J. 8., 2d, xlvii, 428, f. 
Redonda, West Indies, where it was found. Hydrous phosphate of 
aluminum and iron, found in nodules. 

* 

RED ORPIMBNT. A syn. of realgar. 

REDRUTHTTB. J. Nicol, 1849, Mcol Min., 478, f. Redruth, Com 
wall, its locality. A syn. of chalcocite. 

RED SCHORL. Rome de risle, 1788, De L. Cryst., ii, 422 (Schorl 
rouge). An obs. syn. of rutile. 

Also used as a syn. of rubellite, schorl being an early name for tour^ 
maline. 

RED SILVER ORE. The early name for those silver minerals 
which have since been separated into pyrargyrite and proustite. 

RED VITRIOL. An obs. syn. of bieberite. 

RED ZINO ORE. R, Jameeon, 1816, Jam. Min., Hi, 416, f . iU color. 
A syn. of zincite. 

REFDANSKITB. R Hermann, 1867, Jour. Pk. Ch.. cii. 405 
(Rewdanskit), f. the Hutte von Rewdansk, where it was found. A 
nickel if erous silicate near genthite. 

REFmiTE. Lacava, [1852. Jour, des ConnaissancesMed.]. 1859, 

Ley. Min., ii, 400, in honor of Refik-Bey. An oxygenated hydrocarbon. 

REONOLTTE. A. tPAchiardi, 1888. Ach. Met., i, 294. in honor of 
Dr. C. Regnoli. Sulph-arsenide of copper, resembling sandbergerite. 

REIOHARDTTTE. O. Krauee, 1874, Arch. Pharm., 8d. v. 428 
(Reichhardtit), in honor of E. Reichhardt, director of the Stassfurt mines. 
A massive var. of epsoraite. 

REIOHTTE. A.Breiihaupt, 1865, Berg. Hdt., xxiv, 811 (Reichit). in 
honor of Dr. F. Reich. A name given to pure calcite from Alston Moor, 
Eng., with the idea that its rhombohedral angle differed from that of nor- 
mal calcite. 

REINITB. K. V. FriUeh, 1878, Zt. Nat. Halle, iii. 864 (Reinit), 



REISSAOHZSRITB 230 RZ3TINITZ3 

after Dr. Rein, who discovered it. Tungstate of iron, perhaps a 

pseudomorph uf ler scheelite. 

REISSACHERITI]. W. Eaidinger, 1856. Geol. Reich. Jahrb., 
vii, 608, after K. Reissacher, who first described it. A var. of wad, con- 
taiuiug un uuusual percentage of water. 

REISSrril. K. «. FHtscK [1870, Hessenberg Min. Not., No. 9, 22], 
1871, Zt. Gkol., xxiii, 165 (Reissit), f. Reise, ' a journey,' because he found 
it while ti-avelling. A syn. of epistilbite. 

T. Thomson, 1836, Thom. Min., i, 160, has used this name as a syn. of 
reussiu, in the idea that this spelling best suggested its pronunciation. 

REMINOTONrm. J. a Booth, 1852, A. J. 8., 2d, xiv, 48, after 
Edward Remington, Supt. of the mine where it was found. A rose- 
colored incrustation of hydrous carbonate of cobalt, never fully examined. 

RZSMOUNITE. H. J. Brooke and TT. H. Miller, 1852, B. and M. 
Min. , 618, f. Los Remdlinos, Chili, its locality. An obs. syn. of ataca- 
mite. 

RZ3N8SZ3IJERITE. F. Emmons, 1837, Geol. Snrv. N. Y. Rept., 
153, in honor of Stephen Van Rensselaer. A var. of talc, often pseudo- 
morph ous after enstatite. 

RESANrra. P. T. Clew, 1870, Vet. Ak. Stock. , ix, (12), 28 (Resanit), 
in honor of Don Pedro Resauo. Hydrous silicate of copper and iron ; a 
doubtful species. 

RESINAIiITZS. Variant of retinalite. 

RZ3SINITII. R. J, Rauy, 1822, HaUy Min., iv, 454, f. its appear- 
ance. An obs. syn. of retinasphalt. 

RESTORMZSIiITZS. A, H, Church, 1870, Jour. Ch. Soc. , xxiii, 165, 
f. the Restormel mine, Cornwall, its locality. A grayish-green, hydrous 
silicate near agalmatolite. 

RETINAUTZS. T, Thomson, 1836, Thom. Min., i, 201, f. fitirivri, 
* resin,' in allusion to its lustre, and XiBoS, C. U, 8?iepard uses the name, 
4835, Shep. Min., ii, 329, probably having received it in a private com- 
munication. A var. of serpentine occurring in honey-yellow to oil- 
green masses with a resinous lustre. 

RETINASPHALT. C. Hatchett, 1804, Phil. Trans., 410 (Retinas- 
phaltum). f. fitfTivrf, * resin,* and acipaXro?, ' bitumen,' • a name by which 
a full definition of its nature is conveyed.' A resinous substance from 
the tertiary coal of Devonshire, the source of retinellite. 

RETINEIililTE. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min , 748, f. the earliei 
name retinite (Breithaupt), and Azfiio?. A resin like hydrocarbon separ- 
ated from retinasphalt by alcohol. 

RETINITE. J. C. Delametherie, 1795, Delam. T. T., iii, 462, t 



281 RHAOITEI 

i^rjzivrj, ' resin,* alluding to its lustre. An obs. syn. of pitcbstoue, which 
then included semi-opal. 

Used by A. Breithaupt, 1818, Hoflf. Min., iv, (2), 178, for retiuasphalt. 

Also used by E. F. Qlocker, 1881, Glock. Miu., 872, for copalite. 

Later used as a general name for the mineral resins from brown coal, 
which fire similar in appearance, but not otherwise necessarily alike. 

RETZBANYITB. B. Hermann, 1859. Jour. Pk. Ch., Ixxv, 450. 
(Retzbanyit), f . Retzbanya, Hungary, its locality. An obs. name for an 
impure var. of cosalite. 

A. Frenzeh 1883, Min. Milth., v, 175 (Rezbanyit), uses it for a sulphide 
of bismuth and lead from the same locality. 

RETZIAN. H. J^ogren, [1894], 1895, SjOg. Cont. Min., (2), 80, in 
honor of Prof. A. J. Retzius. Arsenate of manganese and calcium, near 
flinkite. 

RETZITZ3. J. B. Bana, 1850, Dana Min., 800, after Prof. A. J. 
Retzius, who first analyzed it. An obs. syn. of edelforsite. 

REUSSIN. B. L, O. Karsten, 1800, Karst. Tab.. 40, after Dr. P. A. 
Reuss, who first examined it. An obs. syn. of mirabilite. 

REUSSITI]. Variant of reussin. 

REUSSINmi. /. B. Bana, 1868, Dana Min., 744. after Prof. A. E. 
Reuss. who described pyroretin. A resin-like constituent of pyroretin, 
soluble in cold alcohol. 

REVDANSKrm. Variant of refdanskite. 

REZBANTrril. See retzbanyite. 

RHABDITII. O. Rate, 1865, Pogg. Ann., cxxiv, 196 (Rhabdit), f. 
fiafidoi, ' a rod,' in reference to the shape of its crystals. A phosphide 
of iron and nickel, found in minute, prismatic crystals in meteoric 
iron. 

RHABDOFHANB. Sec rhabdophanite. 

RHABOOPHANITE. W. G. Letisom, 1878, Zt. Eryst., iii, 191, 
(Rhabdophan), f. pa/SSo^, *a rod,* and (paiveoBaty * to appear,' in allusion 
to the characteristic bands shown in its spectrum. Hydrous phosphate 
of the cerium and yttrium metals, found in globular or stalactitic in- 
crustations. 

RHJBTIZITB. A. O. Werner,, 1815, Hoff. Min., ii, (2), 819, (Rhnti- 
zit), f. Rhsetia, the ancient name of the Tyrol, where it was found. A 
white var. of cyanite. 

RHAOITB. A. Weiabach, 1874, Jour. Pk. Ch., x, 190, (Rhagit), f. 
f^dq, -dyo?, 'a grape,' alluding to its color and botryoidal grouping. 
Hydrous arsenate of bismuth, occurring in yellowish-green, spherical 
concretions. 



RHSNTTB 283 RHODUSTTE 

RHBNrm. F. Alger, 1844, Alger Phil., 501, probably f. Rbenus, 
' the Rhine/ because found near it. An obs. syn. of pseudomalachite. 

RHBTIZmS. Variant of rhsetizite. 

RHOOAUTB. T. Thomson, 1836, Thorn. Min., i, 854, f. fjoddXdi, 

* of roses,' in allusion to its color. An obscure, clay-like mineral of a 

rose-red color, from Antrim, Ireland. 

RHODHAIiOSB F. 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Mm., ii, 481, f. 
poSoeii, 'rose-colorcd,' and a As, dXoi, 'salt,' from its color. An obs. 

syn. of bieberite. 

RHOOrra. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab.. 88. f. its composition. 

A syn. of rhodium gold. 

RHODIUM-OOIiD. J. D. Dana, 1844, Dana Min. 460. A var. 
of gold containing rhodium. 

RHODIZITE. O. Rose, 1834, Pogg. Ann., xxxiii, 253 (Hhodizit). 
f . po8iJ^€iv, * to be rose-colored,' because it tinges the blowpipe-flame red. 
Borate of aluminum and potassium, with calcium and rubidium, found in 
minute crystals on tourmaline. 

RHODOOHROUTB. Error for rhodochrosite. 

RHODOOHROMB. K. O. Fiedler, [1840, Reise durch Griechenland, 
ii, 319], 1842, Ros6 Reis., ii, 157 (Rhodochrom), f. poSov, 'arose,' and 
chrom, f. its color and composition. A rose-colored var. of penninite. 

RHODOCHROSITE. J. F. L. Hausmann, 1813, Haus. Min , iii, 
1081 (Rhodochrosit). f. podo-xpoo^i, ' rose-colored,' in allusion to its color. 
Carbonate of manganese, found in rosy-red crystals and masses. 

RHODOISE. F. 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 610. f. poddeii, 
'rose- colored,' in allusion to its color. An obs. syn. of erythrUe. 

RHODOARSENIAN. L. J. Igelstrom, 1893, Zt. Kryst., xxii, 469, f. 
podov, 'rose,' and arsenicum, alluding to its color and composition. 
Hydrous arsenate of manganese, calcium and magnejium. 

RHODONITE. C. F. Jasche, 1819, Jour. Ch. Ph., xxvi. 112, 
(Rhodonit), f . podov, * a rose, ' because of its color. Silicate of manganese, 
of a bright rose-pink color when pure. 

RHODOFHTLIilTE. F. A. Oenth, 1852, Acad. Nat. Sci. Proc, 118. 
f. podov, 'a rose,' and (puXXov, *a leaf,' alluding to its color and 
structure. A green var. of kftmmererite, which is red in thin splinters. 

RHODOTIIilTE. O. Flink, 1888, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., xlv. 571, 
f. poSov, *a rose,' and riAo?, 'fiber,' from its color and structure. A 
syn. of inesite. 

RHODUSITE. H. v. Foullon, 1891, K. Ak. Wien Ber.. c, (1), 144 
(Rhodusit), f. the island of Rhodes (Rhodus), where it was found. An 
asbestiform var. of glaucophane. of lavender-blue color. 



BHOMBARSBNTTB 288 RZONITB 

RHOBflSARBENITB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 41, f. the 

Ahape of its crystals and its composiiiou. A syn. of claudetite, earlier 
called prismatic arsenious acid. 

RHOBSBIO BUOA. J. D. Dana, 1844^ Dana Min., 822, f. ite mode 
of crystallization. A syn. of phlogopite. 

RHOBSBIO QUARTZ. E. M. da Casta, 1772, Costa Crons., 72. 
referring to its cleavage prisms. An obs. name for feldspar. 

RHOMB-SPAR. M. H. Klaproth, 1795, Elap. Beit., i, 800 (Rhom- 
boidalspath), f. its shape. A syn. of dolomite. 

RHYAOOLTTB. O, Base, 1829. Pogg. Ann., xv, 198 (Ryakolith), 
t. fjva^, 'dKoS, 'a stream of lava,' on account of its source, and Xt^oi. 
Olassy orthoclase, found in the lava of Monte Somma. 

RIOHBIiUTB. O. Cesaro and O. De»prei, 1888, Soc. Geol. Belg. 
Mem., X, 86, f. Richelle, Belgium, its locality. A doubtful phosphate of 
iron and calcium. 

RICHMONDFTB. A. KenngoU, [1866, Nat. Ges. Zurich Viertel- 
jahrs., xi, 225], 1868, Kenng. Ueb. for 1862-5, 58 (Richnioudit), f. Rich- 
mond, Mass., its locality. Separated from gibbsite on account of differ- 
ences in composition and crystallization. 

Also used by W, 8key, 1877, N. Z. lust. Trans., ix, 556, f. Richmond 
Hill, New Zealand, its locality. A sulph-autimouide of lead and other 
metals, which needs further examination. 

RIOHTBRITB. A. Breithaupt, 1865, Berg. Htit., xxiv, 364 (Rich- 
terit), after Prof. Th. Richter, on account of his researches in mineralogical 
chemistry. At first considered a var. of pyroxene occurriug iu acicular 
crystals, but later called a sodium-magiiesium-mangaDese amphibole. 

REBBBOKITB. A. Sauer, 1888, Zt. Geol., xl, 138 (Riebeckit). after 
Dr. E. Riebeck, who collected it. A mineral of the amphibole group, 
occurring in black, prismatic crystals, near crocidolite in composition. 

RIBMANNITE. A, Breiihaupt, 1818, Hoff. Min., iv, (2), 182 
(Riemannit), after the Oberbergrath Riemann, who first called attention to 
it An obs. syn. of allophane. 

RIMEITB. J. Ijyrengen, 1884, Zt. Eryst.. ix, 248 (Rinkit), in honor 
of Dr. Henrik Rink. Director of the Royal Greenland Board of Trade. 
Fluo-titanate and silicate of sodium, calcium and cerium, found in 
yellowish crystals. 

RIOUTB. H. J. Brooke, 1886, Phil. Mag., 8d. viii, 261, after 
A. M. del Rio, who first described it, and AzBo?. A doubtful sulpho- 
«elenide of mercury. 

Also a variant of rionite. 

RZONITB. B, Brauru and T, Pbtenen, 1870, Jahrb. Mhi., 590 



RIPIDOLrrZS 234 ROOK SUiK 

(Rionit), probably in hoDor of Prof. A. M. del Rio. A var. of tetra- 
hedrite containiug bismuth. 

Also a variant of rioHte. 

RIPIDOLITZ3. F, v. Kobell, 1839, Jour. Pk. Ch., xvi. 470 (Ripi- 
dolitb), f. pini<i, -i6oS, 'a fau/alludiug to the fan-shaped aggregations 
of its crystals, and XiBoi. Separated from chlorite on chemical grounds 
and now usually called clinochlore. G, Hose, 1839, Pogg. Ann., xlviii, 
193, applied the name to the original chlorite, which has caused much 
confusion. It is now a syn. of both clinochlore and prochlorite. 

RIPONITE. G. Tschermak, 1883, K. Ak. Wien, Ixxxviii, (1), 1179, 
(Riponit), f. Ripon, Quebec, its locality. A syn. of dipyre. 

RISSEITI]. Adam^ 1869, Adam Tab., 26, after H. Risse, who 

had descnbed it. A syn. of aurichalcite. 

RITTINOERITE. F. X. M. Zippe, 1852, K. Ak. Wien, ix, (2), 345, 
(Ritiingerit), after Peter Rittinger, who discovered it. A syn. of xan- 
ihocoiiite. 

RIVOTITB. X DucUmx, 1874, C. R., Ixxviii, 1471, in honor of Prof. 
L. E. Rivot, of Paris. An amorphous mineral, of yellowish-green color, 
containing antimony, copper and carbon dioxide. 

ROOHIiANDITI]. Error for rocklandite. 

ROOHIiAUDITZS. Error for rocklandite. 

RGOHLEDZSRITE. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 744, after Prof. 
Fr Rochleder, who had described it. The part of a bituminous sub- 
stance described by Rochleder, which is soluble in alcohol. 

Room:. 8. Meunier, 1893, Meun. Fers Met., 44, f. La Bella Roca, 
Mexico, where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 

ROOK-BUTTZ3R. See mountain-butter. 

ROOK-OORE. See mountain- cork. 

ROOE-ORTSTAIi. A popular name for colorless, crystallized quartz. 

ROOEIiANDITI]. L. G. Beck, 1842, Beck. Min., 281, f. Rockland 
Co., N. Y., where it was found. A name proposed, but never used, for 
the common pseudomorph of silicate of magnesium after other minerals. 

ROOE-IjEATHER. a syn. of mountain-leather. 

ROOE-MEAIj. a syn. of mountain-meal. 

ROOE-MIIjE. From Bergmilch, an early name for agaric mineral. 

ROOE-OEL. A syn. of petroleum. 

ROOE-RUBY. An early name for red garnet. 

ROOE-SAIjT. Mineral salt in distinction from that obtained by 
the evaporation of sea water or brine. 

ROOE-SILE. M. F. Heddle, 1878, Min. Mag., ii, 215, f. its appear- 
ance. A silky var. of asbestos. 



ROOK SOAP 235 ROSZSNBUSOHm] 

ROOK-SOAP. See mountain-soap. 

ROOK- WOOD. See mountain -wood. 

ROSMZSRITB. J. Orailich, 1858, E. Ak. Wein, xzviii, 272 (H(5- 
merit), in honor of A. ROmer. Hydrous sulphate of ferrous and ferric 
iron, of a dark chestnut-brown to a yellow color. 

ROSPPBRITB. Q, J, Brush, 1872. Dana Min. App. i, 18, after 
Prof. W. T. Roepper, its first analyst. An iron-manganese-zinc chryso- 
lite, of dark green to black color. 

Also used by A. Kenngott, 1872, Jahrb. Min., 188, f or a cleavable var. 
of rhodochrosite, containing calcium. 

RQSSMBRITZI. Error for rocmerite. 

ROSSSUEIRITB. J, R. Blum, [1861. Jtihres d. Wetterauer Ges., 32,] 
1861, Jahrb. Min., 834 (ROsslerit), in honor of Dr. E. R(yssler. Hydrous 
arsenate of magnesium, found in thin, white crystalline plates. 

ROBSTONB. A syn. of oOlite. 

ROSTTISITB. See rOttisite. 

ROOBRSFTB. J, L. 8mWi, 1877, A. J. S.. 8d, xiii, 867, in honor 
of Prof. Wm. B. Rogers. Hydrous columbate of yttrium, an altera- 
tion product of samarskite, on which it is found as a thin, white coat- 
ing. 

ROMANZOVTTB. N, Nardenskiold, 1820. Nord. Bidrag, 14 (Roman- 

zovit), in honor of Count Romimzov. Brown gn)88ularite from 

Finland. 

ROMEINB. See romeite. 

ROMBITE. A. Daimur, 1841, Ann. des M.. 3d, xx, 247 (Romeine), 
in honor of Rom6 de L*Isle. Antimonate of calcium occurring in groups 
of yellow crystals. 

ROBftBRITB. See roemerite. 

ROSOOBLITE. J, Blake, 1876, A. J. S., 8d, xii. 81, after Prof. H. 
E. Roscoe. in recognition of his work on vanadium compounds, and Az19o?. 
A micaceous mineral containing vanadic acid, found in aggregations of 
minute green scales. 

ROSBITB. C. H. Stubbs, about 1879, priv. com., J. F. Rose, dated 
May. 1895, after Dr. J. F. Rose, of Oxford, Pa., who first found it. An 
altered mica, of a brownish-yellow color, and soft as talc. 

ROSELTTB. A. Levy, 1824. Ann. Phil., viii, 489. in honor of Prof. 
G. Ros^, and XiBoi, Hydrous arsenate of cobalt and calcium, found in 
small, rose- red crystals. 

ROSBULAN. Variant of rosite. 

ROSBIXTTE. Variant of rosellan. 

ROSBNBUSOHITB. W. 0, BrOgger, 1887, Geol. F5r. FOrh., ix. 



ROaBNTTZI 286 RUBRITE 

254 (Rosenbuschit), in honor of Prof. H. Roseobusch. Silicate of zir- 
conium, titanium, calcium and sodium, of light orange-gray color. 

ROSBNTTZS. Variant of rosite. 

ROSB-QUARTZ. The well-known rose-colored var. of quartz. 

ROSITE. L. F. Smnberg, 1840, Vet. Ak. Stock., 158 (Rosit), in 
allusion to its color. A granular, rose-red mineral, usually classed under 
pinite. 

Also used hyJ. J. N, Huot, 1841. Huot Miu., i, 197, after Prof. G. 
Rose, who had analyzed it. An obs. syn. uf chalcostibite. 

ROSSTRHVORITE. R. P. Oreg and W, G, LetUom, 1858, G. and 
L. Min., 105, f. Rosstrevor, Ireland, its locality. An obs. name for a 
fibrous var. of epidote. 

ROSTERITB. Q. QratUirola, [1880, Rivista Scient. Ind. Firenze, 
No. 19, 1-10], 1881, Jahrb. Miu., 167. in honor of Dr. G. Rosier. A 
Blightly altered var. of beryl of pale- red color. 

ROSTHORNTTE. H, Hofer, 1871, Jahrb. Miu., 561 (Rosthornit). in 
lienor of Frauz von Rosthom, a geologist of Cariuthia. An oxygenated 
hydrocarbon of a brown color, found in lenticular masses in coal. 

ROTHOFFTTE. J. J, Berzelius, 1819, Berz. Nouv. Syst., 218, after 
E. Rothoff, who had analyzed it. A mauganesian var. of andradite. 

ROTTISITE. A. Breithaupt, 1859, Berg. Hat., xviii, 1, (ROttisit). f. 
R5ttis, Saxony, its locality. Hydrous silicate of nickel, very near 
igenthite. 

ROUBSOHTTE. J. C. Delametherie, 1806, Jour, de Phys., Ixii. 360, 
i. Hrubschitz, Moravia, its locality. An obs. syn. of magnesite. 

ROWIiANDITE. W. E, Hidden, 1891, A. J. S., 3d, xlii. 430, after 
Prof. Henry A. Rowland, in recognition of his * spectrographic work on 
the so called rare earths.' Silicate of yttrium of a pale drab-green color. 

RUBEIiliAN. A. BreiViaupt, 1830. Breit. Ulb., 26. probably f. 
Tubellus, * reddish,' in allusion to its color. An altered biotite, occurring 
in small, red. hexagonal plates. 

RUBBIililTE. R. Kirwan, 1794. Kirw. Min., i, 288. probably f. 
rubellus, ' reddish.* in allusion to its color. A rose or violet-red var. of 
tourmaline, often cut as a gem. 

RUBBRITE. E, J. Chapman, 1843. Chap. Min., 68, f. ruber, 'red/ 
in allusion to its color. An obs. syn. of cuprite. 

RUBIOBIiliB. An early name for ruby-spinel. 

RUBISIilTB. M. F. Heddle, 1879. Roy. Soc. Ed. Trans., xxix, 112, 
f. Rubislaw. Scotland, its locality. A doubtful member of the chlorite 
group, found in dark-green, granular or foliated masses. 

RUBRITB. L, Darapsky, 1890, Jahrb. Min., i, 65 (Rubrit), f. rubra, 



BUB7 287 RUTZLITB 

'red/ Id allusion to its color. Hydrous sulphate of iron, found in lami- 
nated crystals of deep red color. 

RUBT. From rubeus, ' red/ in allusion to its color. The deep red 
▼ar. of corundum, a very valuable gem. 

This name is sometimes applied to red spinel. 

RUBT-BUEINDB. F, MohB. 1820, Mohs Char., 98, f. its color and 
the name of its order. An obs. name including proustite, pyrargyrite 
and some myargyrite. 

Also a syn. of ruby-zinc (zincite). 

RUBT-OOPPBR. An early name for cuprite, f . its color. 

RUBT-BUOA. /. F, L. Haumann, 1813, Haus. Min.. 1, 268 (Rubin- 
glimmer), f. its color and structure. An obs. syn. of goethite. 

RUBY OF AR8ENIO. An early name for realgar. 

RUBY OF SULPHUR. Syn. of ruby of arsenic. 

RUBY-SILVER. An early name including proustite and pyrargy- 
rite, alluding to their color. 

RUBY-SPINEL. An early name for red spinel, often cut as a gem. 

RUBY-SULPHUR. See ruby of sulphur. 

RUBY-ZINO. A popular name for trauspareut sphalerite of a deep- 
red color, and also for zincite with the same chaiacteristics. 

RUDDLE. Variant of reddle. 

RUIN-AOATE. A popular uame for a var. of agate having angular 
markings which present a fancied resemblance to ruius, or fortifications, 
hence also called fortification-agate. 

RUIN-MARBTiE. A popular name for a var. of marble exhibiting 
brown-colored markings resembling ruins. 

RUMANTTE. 0. Helm, 1891, Nat. Oes. Danz. Schrift., vii, (4), 186 
(Rdmanit), f. RQmauia, the country in which it was found. An amber- 
like resin, found in brownish-yellow, brittle masses. 

RUMPFTTE. G. Firtsch, 1890, K. Ak. Wien, xcix, (1), 417 (Rump- 
fit), in honor of Prof. Johann Rumpf. Hydrous silicate of aluminum 
and magnesinm, found in greenish-white, granular masses. 

RUTENTTE. A. BreiUiaupt, 1866, Berg. Hat., xxv, 158 (Rutenit), 
f. Rutenia, an old name of the Saxon Yoigtland, its locality. A syn. of 
jaipurite. 

RUTHERFORDITE. C. U. Shepard, 1851, Am. Assoc, iv, 812, f. 
Rutherford Co., N. C. its locality. Probably identical with fergusonite. 

RUnLE. A. O. Werner, 1803. Ludw. Min.. i. 55, f. rutilus. 'red.' 
in allusion to its color. Oxide of titanium, usually found in red or 
brownish-red prismatic crystals. 

RUTILTTE. Variant of rutile. 



RTAOOLTTB 288 SANGUINITB 

RTAOOUTB. See rhyacolite. 

RYAKONTTB. Error for rhyacolite. 

8ACCHARITB. B. F. Olocker, 1845, Jour. Pk. Ch.. xxxiv, 494 (Sac- 
charit), f. (TixKxoip, ' sugar,' from its resemblance to sugar. A granular, 
massive mineral, at first referred to andesite, but now considered a mixture. 

SACCHITI]. See scacchile. 

BJETHRQBHRQTrH. See sfttersbergite. 

SAFFLORTTX:. A. BreWiavpt, 1835, Jour. Pk. Ch., iv, 265 (Saf- 
florit), f. Safflor, 'zaffer/ because used in the manufacture of zaffer. 
Arsenide of cobalt similar to smaltite. but orthorhombic. 

SAGBNITB. H. B. de Satmure, 1796, Saus. Alp., vii, § 1894, f. 
adyj^vTf, *a net.' A var. of rutile in which slender crystals are inter- 
laced, forming a network. 

SAHTiITB. B. J, d^Andrada, 1800, All. Jour. Chem., iv, 31 (Sahlit), 
f. Sahla (Sala), Sweden, its locality. Calcium-iron pyroxene, found in 
greenish or black masses. 

SAIiAITE. Yaiiant of sahlite. 

SAIi AMMONIAC. Native chloride of ammonium. 

SALDANTTB. J. J. N, Huot, 1841, Huot. Min., ii, 451, f. the Sal- 
dana river, U. S. Columbia, its locality. An obs. syn. of alunogen. 

SALITB. Variant of sahlite; used by A. O, Werner, 1809, Tasch. 
Min., iii. 281 (Salit). 

SAIiMIAE. Syn. of sal ammoniac. 

8ALMITE. E. Prost, 1883, Soc. Geol. Belg. Bull., x, p. clvi, f. the 
river Salm, Belgium, its locality. A manganesian var. of chloritoid. 

8AMARSEITB. H. Rose, 1847, Pogg. Ann., Ixxi, 157 (Samarskit), 
in honor of the Oberst von Samarski. A complex columbate of uranium 
and other bases. 

SAMOITE. J. D. Dana, 1850, Dana Min., 288, f. the Samoa Isl.. 
where it was found. Hydrous silicate of aluminum, found in white, 
stalactitic forms. 

Also used by B. Silliman, Jr., 1849, Dana Geol. Pacif., 732, for an in- 
correctly analyzed feldspar, probably labradorite. 

SANDARACA. An early name for realgar. 

SANDBBRGBRITB. A, Breithaupt, 1866, Berg. Hat., xxv, 187 
(Sandbergerit), after Prof. F. von Saudberger, in recognition of his studies 
upon telrahedrite. A var. of tennantite conlaiuiug a considerable amount 
of zinc. 

SANGUINITB. K A. Miers, 1890, Min. Mag., ix, 182, f. sanguis, 
-inis, ' blood,' in allusion to its blood-red color by transmitted light. A 
doubtful sulph-arsenide of silver near proustite. 



8ANIDIMB 239 8AROOPSIDB 

SANIDINX:. K. W. Na%e, 1808, N5gg. Min. Stud., 24, f. crarrS, -r(5o5, 
' a board,' from the shape of its crystals. A glassy var. of orthoclase, 
fouud in flat crystals. 

SANTUilTX:. T. ThoTMon, 1818, Aud. Phil., xii, 468, after Prof. O. 
Santi, who had described it under the name of amiatite, and At6o$. An 
obs. syn. of florite. 

SAPHIRINB. See sapphirine. 

SAPONITB. L, F. Svanberg, 1840. Vet. Ak. Stock., 158 (Sapouit), f. 
sapo, -onis. 'soap,' from its earlier name Selfeustein, *sonp rock.' M. H, 
KlaproVi, 1787. Ges. Nat. Berl. Schrift., vii, 163, on account of its soap- 
like appearance. Hydrous silicate of aluminum and magnesium, at first 
soft, but becoming brittle on drying. 

Also used by J. Niekle9, 1859, Ann. Ch. Phys., Ivi, 46. A soap-like 
clay, now classed with moutmorillonite. 

8APPARX2. N. T. de Saumire, 1789, Jour, de Phys., xxxiv, 218. 
An error for the word sapphire, from a label attached to a specimen of cya- 
nite. An obs. syn. of cyanite. 

SAPPARm]. Variant of sappare. 

8APPHIRS From crdmpeipo^i, *a blue stone ' of the ancients, not 
our modern sapphire, but perhaps lapis lazuli. Transparent or trans- 
lucent varieties of corundum, of various colors, used as gems In common 
use the name is generally confined to the blue variety. 

8APPHIRINB. 0. L. GieMcke, [1819. GOtt. Ges. Anz., 1994], 1821, 
Leon. Orykt., 416 (Saphirin), f. its sapphire-blue color. Silicate of alumi- 
num and magnesium, found in blue grains, often disseminated. 

Used by K. W, iVoM, 1808, N6gg Min. Stud.. 162 (Saphirin). An obs. 
syn. of haUynite. 

Also earlier used for blue chalcedony. 

SARAWAETTB. A. Frenzel, 1877, Min. Mitth.. 800 (Sarawakit), f. 
Sarawak, Borneo, its locality. An anhydrous antimony compound not 
yet analyzed, found in small, colorless crystals. 

8AROITB. IL Townion, 1800, Jam. Scot. Isles, i, 13, perhaps f. the 
river Sark, Scotland. An obs. name for a trapezohedral mineral not 
now identified, but probably leucite. 

8AROOLITB. TT. Thompson, 1807, Mus. Hist. Ann., ix, 241, f. 
adp^, orapKo^, ' flesh,' in allusion to its color, and A/OoS. Silicate of 
aluminum and calcium, occurring in flesh-red to reddish-white crystals. 

Also used by L. If, Vanquelin, 1809, Mus. Hist. Ann., xi, 42 (Sar- 
colithe). An obs. syn. of gmelinite. 

8ARCOP8IDB. M. Websky, 1868. Zt. Geol., xx, 245 (Sarkopsid), 
f. crdpi, aapK6%, 'flesh,' aud o^r?, -tdoi, 'view,' in allusion to its color. 



SARD 240 SAUSSlfRITB 

Phosphate of iron and manganese, closely related to triplite, of flesh-red 
color on a fresh fracture. 

SARD. From actpdiv?, or adpdiov, which was probably derived 
from 2a'p8t?, the reputed locality of the stone. A syn. of carue- 
lian. 

SARDINIAN. A. Breithaupt, 1865, Berg. Htlt., xxiv, 820, f. Sar- 
dlDia, where it was found. A syn. of auglesite, the name being given on 
account of a supposed difference in crystalliztition. 

SARDONYX. Like onyx, but made up of layers of red or brown 
(sard) and white, instead of black and white. 

SARKINITE. A, ^ogren, 1885, Geol. F5r. F5rh., vii, 724 (Sarkiuit), 
f. <T(X/jKiyoi, 'fleshy,* in allusiou to both its flesh-red color and greasy 
lustre. Arsenate of manganese, of flesh-red or rose-red color. 

SARTORITB. /. 2>. Dana, 1868, Dana Min„ 87, after Sartorius 
von Waltershausen, who first described it. Sulph-arsenide of lead, found 
in dark, lead-gray, orthorhombic crystals. 

SASBACHITD. J. Schill, 1862, Descl. Min. i, 420, (saspachite), f. 
Saspach (Sasbach), Baden, its locality. An obscure zeolitic mineral, 
occurring in tufts of while, silky fibers. 

SASPACEOTD. Variant of sasbachVte. 

8ASSOIJND. See sassolite. 

SASSOIJTB. D. L, Q, Karsten, 1800, Earst. Tab., 40 (Sassolin), 
f. Sasso, Tuscany, where it was found, and XtBoi. Native boric acid» 
found in white, pearly scales. 

SATDRSBDRGITD. A. Kenngott, 1853, Eenng. Min., Ill (Ssters- 
bergit), f. Satersberg, Norway, its locality. A syn. of lOllingite. 

SATIN-SPAR. An early name for fibrous calcite, having a silky lustre. 

Silky, fibrous aragonite has also been so called. 

Also applied to a fine, fibrous var. of gypsum, with a pearly lustre. 

SATX7RNITB. R. Kirwan, 1874, Kirw. Min., 861, f. Saturn, the 
alchemistic name for lead. The name given to a furnace product from 
lead smelting, at first considered a simple mineral. 

SAUAIiPITD. A local name, used by Carinthian mineralogists, 1807, 
Klap. Beit., iv, 179 (Sau-Alpit), f. the Sau-Alpe, Carinthia. where it wa» 
found. An obs. S3m. of zoisite. 

SAUOONTTB. W. T. Baspper, 1875, Min. Penn., 120, f. the Saucon 
valley, Lehigh Co., Penn., its locality. A buff-colored clay, oontaining- 
a large percentage of zinc oxide. 

SAUSSURTTB. N. T. de Sausmre, 1806, Jour, des M. , xix, 206, 
after Prof. H. B. de Saussure, who had described it earlier. A very- 
compact var. of zoisite, often called jade. 



8AVITB 841 SOHBFFBRrrXI 

SAVXTB. J, Meneghini and E. Beehi, 1852» A. J. 8., 2d, ziv, 64, 
Id honor of Prof. P. Savi. Ad obs. syn. of natrolite. 

SAVODINSKmi. J. J. N. Huot, 1841, Huot Idin., i, 187, f. Savo- 
dinski, Siberia, its locality. Au obs. sjn. of hessite. 

SAYMITX:. F, V. Kobell, 1858, Kob. Taf.. 18 (Saynit), f. Sayn. 
Prussia, its locality. Au obs. syn. of grUnauite. 

8CACCHITB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 70. after Prof. A. 

Scacchi, wbo first described it as a proto-cbloiide of maugauese. 

Used earlier by N. Nordenskiold, 1849, Nord. Atom Ch. Min. Syst., 94 
(Saccbit), a misprint. An obs. syn. of mouticellite. 

Also used by L. Palmieri, 1861, Brist. Gloss. 884. An uncertain 
compound of lead and selenium, found in tbe fumeroles of Vesuvius. 

SOAIiB-STONB. A translation of lepidolite. 

BOAPOLTTB. B. J. dAndrada, 1800, Jour, de Phys., li, 246, f. 
iTKitnoi, 'a shaft, 'alluding to tbe prismatic shape of its crystals, and 
XBoi, A syn. of wernerite, now, however, used generally as a group 
name which includes several tetragonal minerals. 

SOARBROrrB. TT. H. Vernon, 1829, Phil. Mag., 2d. v, 180, f. 
Scarborough, England, its locality. A white, clayey substance similar 
to schrOtterite. 

80HABA81TB. Variant of chabazite. 

BOHJBTZBIiUTB. See schfitzellite. 

80HAFFNBRITB. Vigener, 1884, Nied. Qes. Bonn, 87 

(Schaffnerit). after Dr. Schaffner, who collected it. A syn. of cupro- 

decloizite. 

80HAPBA0HITB. A, KenngoU, 1858, Eenng. Min., 118 (Schnp- 

bachit), f. Schapbach. Baden, its locality. Sulphide of bismuth, lead 
and silver, near cosalite. 

SCHATZBIaUTB. E. Beichardt, 1865, Berg. Hat., xxiv, 276, 

(Schfttz'ellit), after Schfttzell, a director of the Stassfurt salt works. 

A syn. of sylvite. 

BOHBBIiITB. K. C. v, Leonhard, 1821, Leon. Orykt., 594 (Schee- 
lit), after K. W. Scheele, the discoverer of tungstic acid. Called earlier 
Scheelerz by 2>. L. O. Karsten, 1800, Earst. Tab., 56. Tungstate of 
calcium, found in brilliant crystals of various colors. 

80HBBUTINB. F, 8. Beudant, 1882, Beud. Min.. ii. 662. f. iu 
resemblance to scheelite. An obs. syn. of stolzite, 

80HBBRBRITB. Fr. Stromeper, 1827, Arch. Ges. Nat., x, 118, 
(Scheererit), after Capt. von Scheerer, its discoverer. A solid hydro- 
carbon, found in pearly, tabular crystals of various shades of color. 

8CHBFFBRITB. J. A. Michaelson, 1862, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., 



80HSIUEIRITB 242 8CHORI« 

zix, 507 (Scbefferit), io honor of H. T. Scbefifer. a Swedish chemist. A 
iDangnnese pyroxene, of yellowish or reddish-brown color, sometimes 
coutainiDg iroo. 

Error for scheererite. 

C, A. 8. Hoffmann, 1789, Berg. Jour., i, 187, 
(Schieferspatb), 'slate-spar,' f. its appearance. A syn. of argentine. 

SCHILIiBR-SPAR. J, C. H. Heyer, 1786, Cbem. Ann., i, 835, 
(Schillerspatb), f. scbillem, * to exhibit a play of colors,' alluding to its 
changing lustre. A syn. of bastite. 

SCHIRIj. An early form of schorl. 

SCHIRMERmS. F, A, QenVi, 1874, Am. Phil. Soc. Proc., xiv, 
230, in honor of Dr. J. F. L. Scbirmer. Sulphide of bismuth, lead and 
silver, of a lead -gray color. 

Also used by F, M. Bndlich, 1874, E. M. Jour., xviii, 183, for a mix- 
ture containing telludum, gold, silver and iron. 

SCHLANITX:. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 745, f. Schlau, 
Bohemia, its locality. The soluble part of anthracoxen, a brown, resin- 
ous powder. 

SCHIiERITINITB. Error for scleritinite. 

SOHNEEBERGITB. A. Breeina, 1880, Geol. Reich. Verb., 813, 
(Schneebergit), f. Schneeberg, Tyrol, its locality. An obscure com- 
pound of antimony and calcium, found in small, honey-yellow crystals. 

SOHNBIDBRTTB. J. Meneghini and E, Beehi, 1852, A. J. S., 2d. 
xiv, 64, after Schneider, director of the mine where it was found. A 
syn. of laumontite. 

SCHOARTTB. Error for schoharite. 

SOHCBMITB. B, Reichardt, 1865, Jahrb. Min. , 602 (Sch6nit), after 
Berghauptman Sch6ne, the discoverer of kainite, on which it was found. 
A var. of picromerite. 

SCHOHARTTB. A, Eaton, 1819. Macneven At. Th. App., 19, f. 
Schoharie Co., N. Y., where it was found. An obs. name for an impure, 
fibrous barite. 

SCHORL. J. O, Wallenus, 1747, Wall. Min., 139 (Schorl), the deri- 
vation of which is unknown. This name at first included many dark- 
colored species, foand in prismatic crystals. Borne de VIsle, 1772, De L. 
Cryst., 267, shows schorl to be indentical with tourmaline, of which it has 
since been a synonym. 

As shown by J. B. Bana, 1868, Dana Min., 206, it was used by Glea- 
ner in 1565 (Schrul), by Erker in 1595 (Shurl), and by Brllckmann in 1727 
(Schirl), and was applied to the * black, little stones ' which were rejected 
in the washing of gold and tin ores. 



80H0RUTE 248 SOHWEIZERTTS 

SCHORUTB. M. K KlaproVi, 1788. Chem. Add., i. 395 (Scborlit), 
f. A. O. Werner's Scborlarliger beryll, 1780, Wern. CiODSt., 169. Ad 
obs. syo. of pycDite. 

Used by T. 8. Hunt, 1886, HuDt Phys.. 851, for tbe black var. of 
touriualiDe. 

SOHORLOBOTE. C. U. Shepard, 1846, A. J. S., 2d, ii, 252, f. scborl 
aod o/doSf *ODe aod tbe same,' od accouot of its reseoiblauce to scborl. 
TitaDO-silicate of iroo aDd calcium, fouud iu velvet-black masses. 

SOHRAUFITB. J, v. Schrockingei; 1875, Geol. Reicb. Verb., 184 
(Scbniufit), Id boDor of Prof. A. Scbrauf. A fossil resia of a byuciDtb- 
red color, fouod iu rouDded masses. 

BCHREIBERSITE. W. Haidinger, 1847, Haid. Ber., iii, 70 (Scbrei- 
bersit), io bouor of C. F. A. vou Scbreibers. Phospbale of irou aud 
nickel, fouod ouly io meteoric irou. 

Also used by C. U. Shepard, 1846, A. J. S , 2d, ii, 888, for a supposed 
Bcsqui sulpbide of cbromium, fouud iu a meteorite. 

SCHROCKERINGITB. Error for scbrOckiugerite. 

SCHROCKINGBRITXI. A. Sdiravf, 1878, Miu. Mittb., 187 
(Scbr5ckiDgerit), after Barou J. vou ScbrOckioger, from wbom it was 
received. 

SOHROTTERITB. E. F. Qlocker, 1889, Glock. MiD., 586 (SchrDt- 
terit), after Prof. A. ScbrOtter. wbo bad described it. Hydrous silicate 
of alumiuum, resembliog allopbaoe. 

BOHUOHARDTITB. A, Sehravf, 1882, Zt. Eryst., vi, 886 (Scbuc- 
hardtit), iu hooor of Tb. Scbucbardt, tbe well-kuowD miDeral dealer. 
A name for the so-called Cbrysopraserde of Silesia. 

BOHUIiZITB. J. F, L. Ilausmann, 1847, Haus. Haudb., i, 166, 
(Schulzit), in bonor of Mine Inspector W. Scbulz, its discoverer. An 
obs. syn. of gcocronite. 

BOHUNGITB. A. v. Inoetramiff, 1886. Jabrb. Miu., i, 92 (Scbungit), 
f. Scbunga, Russia, its locality. An amorpbous form of carbon similar 
to grapbitoid. 

BOHUTZmi. D, L. O. KarsUn, 1800, Earst. Tab., 86 (Scbutzit), 
after Scbutz, from wbom it was received. An obs. syn. of celestiie. 

BOHWARTZEMBBRGITB J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 120, 
after Dr. Scbwartzemberg, its discoverer. Oxy-chloro-iodide of lead, 
fouud Id small, yellow crystals. 

BOHWARTZITB. Error for schwatzite. 

BOHWATZITB. A, KenngoU, 1858, EeDDg. Min., 117 (Schwatzit), 
f. Schwaz, Tyrol, its locality. A mercurial var. of tetrabedrite. 

Th. Bdieerer, 1847, Pogg. Ann., Uxi. 447 



SCHWETZTTB 244 SOOVILIiITZr 

(Schweizerit), after Prof. M. E. Schweizer, its discoverer. A syn. of 
antigorite. 

SCHWETZITB. S. Meunier, 1893, Meun. Fers Met., 45, f. Schwetz, 
Prussia, where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 

SCIiBRZlTINm:. J. W. MalUt, 1852, Phil. Mag., 4th. iv, 261. f. 
CTKXrjpoi, 'hard,' and prfTivTf, ' resin.' A hard, fossil resin of black or 
brown color. 

SCLBROOIaASB. W 8. v. WalUrBhauun, 1855, Pogg. Ann., xciv, 
115 (Skleroklas), f. crKXrjpo'i, *hard,' and kXclv, *to break,' on account of 
its exceeding brittleness. A syn. of sartorite. 

Sometimes used as a syn. of dufrenoysite. 

8COLBCITB. A. F, Oehlen nud J. N. FuehM, 1813, Jour. Ch. Ph.. 
viii, 861 (Scolezit), f. a-KoSXrfz* -cxkoS, 'a worm,* because it sometimea 
curls up when heated. Hydrous silioite of aluminum and calcium^ 
found in acicular crystals and fibrous or radiated masses. 

SOOIjERITB. Error for scorilite. 

SCOURITB. Error for scorilite. 

SOOIiBZBROSB. F. 8. Beudant, 1832, Bend. Min.. ii, 55, probably U 
CTKoDXrfz, the root of scolecite, on account of its earlier name, anhydrous- 
scolecite, with a distinguishing termination added. An obs. syn. of meionite. 

800L0PSITB. F. n. Kobell. 1849. K. Ak. Milnch. Anz.. xxviii. 68a 
(Skolopsit), f. (TKoXoip, ' a thorn, splinter,' because of its splintery fracture. 
A syn. of ittuerite. 

SOORIUTB. T. Thnnuun, 1836. Thom. Min.. i, 879, f. scoria, allud- 
ing to its appearance, and XtBoi. A silioite of aluminum, iron and lime, 
probably a volcanic glass. 

SCORODITB. A. BreiViaupt, 1818. Hoff. Min,. iv, (2), 182 (Skorodit), 
f. a-KopoSiov, * garlic-like.' alluding to its odor when heated. Hydrou» 
phosphate of iron, found in pale-green or brown crystals and crusts. 

SOORZA. I). L. O, KarsUn 1800 Karst. Tab.. 72. f. the older name 
Skortza. used by Wallachian minere. An obs. name for epidote. when 
found in the form of dark green sand. 

SOOTIOIilTB. A, E, Arppe, 1858 (read 1857). Soc. Sci. Fenn.. v, 47» 
(Scotiolit), f. (TKorioS, 'dark.' alluding to its color, and XiBoi. A var. 
of hisingerite, containing more magnesium and less water than usual . 

SOOULBRTTB. R. D Tliamson, 1840. Phil. Mag., 8d, xvii. 408. 
after Dr. John Scouler, from whom it was received. An impure var. of 
mesole. 

Also applied to a pipe stone from North America, having a similar 
composition. 

SOOVILIiITB. O. J. Brush and 8. L, Penfield, 1888, A. J. 8., 8d, 



8EA-FOAM 245 SBBSBUNB 

zzY, 459, f. the Scoville ore-bed, Salisbury, Good., its locality. A syn. 
of rbabdopbanite. 

8SA-FOAM. Ad early syn. of meerschaum. 

8BA-80UM. Syn. of sea-foam. 

SBBBSrrXI. A. Breithaupt, 1847, Brelt. HaDdb., iii. 689 (Sebedt), 
f. 8ebe8, SiebeubOrgen, its locality. An obs. syn. of tremolite. 

8X:x:BAOHITE. M. Bauer, 1872, Zt. Geol.. xxiv, 891 (Seebachit), 
in honor of Carl von Seebach. A syn. of phacolite. 

8BI«ADONlTB. I^e celadonite. 

8BI<BITB. W, Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 506 (Selbit), after 
Oberbergmeister C. J. Selb, who discovered it. A very doubtful 

carbonate of silver, probably a mixture. 

8BLBNOnPRITB. 0. U, Sliepard, 1885, Shep. Min., ii, 177, f. its 
composition. An obs. syn. of berzeliauite. 

8BLBNITE. /. O. Wallerius, 1747, Wall. Min., 60 (Selenites), f. 
treXTfyrf, 'the moon,' probably alluding to its pale, bluish reflections. 
The transparent var. of gypsum, found in crystals, or easily cleavable 
masses. 

8BIjBinUM . Selenium as a mineral, of very doubtful occurrence. 

8BLBNOLITB. E. 8. Daiia, 1892, Dana Min., 201, f. its compo- 
sitioD. Native selenious acid, a doubtful mineral. 

8BIjBNPALLAPITB. Variant of selenpalladium. 

8BLBNPAIXADinM. J. K. L. Zineken, 1829, Pogg. Ann., xvi, 
497, because at first considered a compound of selenium and palladium. 
A syn. of allopalladium. 

8BI<BN8n:iVBB. J. 2>. Dana, 1844, Dana Min., 487. f. its compo- 
sition. An obs. syn. of naumannite. 

SBLBHSULPHUB. Fr. Strameyer, 1825, Jour. Ch. Ph.. xliii, 452 
(Schwefelselen). f. its composition. A native compound of sulphur and 
selenium in undetermined proportions. 

SBLBN-TBLLUBIUM. B. 8, Dana and H, L. Wells, 1890, A. J. S., 
xl, 79, f. its composition. A native compound of selenium and tellurium. 

8BZXAITB. J, Str&ver, 1868, Tor. Ac. AtU, Iv, 86, in honor of 
Quintino Sella. Fluoride of magnesium, found in colorless, transparent 
crystals. 

SBIiWTNITB. O, H. 8, Ulrieh, [1867, Laboratory, i, 287], 1808, 
Dana Min., 509, after A. C. Selwyn, of the (Geological Survey of Victoria. 
A clay-like substance, colored emerald-green by chromium. 

8BMBLINB. Fl. de Belleme, 1800. Jour, dc Phys., li, 442. f. semen 
lini, 'flax seed,' alluding to a common form of its crystals. A «yn. of 
titanite. 



8BMIOPAL 246 

SEMIOPAL. A. O, Werner, 1788, Berg. Jour., ii, 489 (Halbopal), 
because an inferior var. of opal. 

SBMSETITX:. J. A. Krmner, [1881, Mag. Akad. Ertesitoje, xv, 
111], 1883, Zt. Kryst., viii, 533 (Semseyit), in honor of A. von Semsey. 
Sulpb-antimonide of lead, near jamesonite. 

SBNARMONTTTB. J. D. Dana, 1851, A. J. S., 2d, xii, 209, after 
U. de Senarmont, who first described it. Antimony trioxide, found in 
colorless or gi-ayishwbite octahedrons. 

SENXSCA-OII«. An early name for petroleum, perhaps derived from 
Seneca lake, New York, but more probably because it was collected by 
the Seneca Indians. 

SEPIOIilTX:. B. F. Qlockffr, 1847, Qlock. Syn., 190 (Sepiolith), f. 
crifTttov, * cuttle-fish bone,' because a light product of the sea, the older 
name of the mineral being sea-foam, and XiBoi, Hydrous silicate of mag- 
nesium, commonly called meei-schaum. 

SBRBIAN. A. Breithaupt, 1838, Jour. Pk. Ch., xv, 327, f. Serbian, 
' Servia,' where it was found. An obs. syn. of miloschite. 

SBRIOITB. K. List, 1852, Ann. Ch. Pharm., Ixxxi, 257 (Sericit). f . 
(TTfplKoS, * silken,' alluding to its lustre. A var. of muscovite, occur- 
ring in fibrous aggregations. 

SBRIOOLITB. J, F, L. Hausmann, 1847, Haus. Min., ii, 1242 (Seri- 
kolith), f. arjplKd'i, 'silken,' in allusion to Its lustre, and XBoi, An 
obs. syn. of satin spar. 

SBRPBNTINB. O. Agricola, 1646, Agric, 313 (Serpentarla), f. 
6ipiTrf<;, * of a serpent,* after P. Dioseorades, about 50, Dioscor., Lib. v. 
Cap. 161, because of the mottled and scaly appearance of serpentine mar- 
ble. Hydrous silicate of magnesium, occurring in many varieties. 

8ERPIBRITB. A. Des Chueaux, 1881, Bull. Soc. Min., iv, 92, 

after Serpieri, who was very active in the development of the 

Laurium mines. Basic sulphate of copper and zinc, from Laurium, 
Greece. 

SBTTUNGITB. A. Des Cloizeaux, 1872, Des CI. Min, ii, (1), 42, f. 
Settling Stones, Eng., its locality. Called Settling Stones Resin, by 
J, D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min. , 735. A hydrocarbon found in yellow to 
red, resinous drops on the walls of an old mine. 

SBTTUNQ STONBS RB8IN. See settlingite. 

SBVBRITB. Wm. PJiUlips, 1823, Phil. Min., 87, f. St. Sever, 
France, its locality. A syn. of lenzinite. 

SBYBBRTITB. T, Clemson, 1832, Ann. des M., 3d, ii, 498, in honor 
of H. Seybert. A syn. of clintonite. 

SHEPARDITB. W. Haidinger, 1847, Haid. Ber., iii, 282 (Shep. 



8HIVBR-SPAR 247 SIDSROOOMITB 

ardit). after C. XJ. Shepard, who had previously described it. A hypo- 
thetical cromium sesqui-sulphide, found in a meteorite. 

Also used by O. JR&se, 1863, Pogg. Add., czviii, 419. A syn. of 
chladnite. 

Also by H. J, Brooke^ 1844, Shep. Min., 126. A syu. of brucite. 

SHIVER-SPAR. Variant of schicferspar. 

SHORL. Variant of schorl. 

SIBERTTB.. a Lermina, [1799, Jour, de I'ficole polytech., (6), 489], 
1801, HaUy Min., iv, 284, f. Siberia, where it was found. An. obs. syn. 
of rubellite. 

SICIUANITB. J. O, Lenz, [1800. Lenz Min., 288], 1801, Gal. Rec, 
248 (Sicilianit), f. Sicily, its locality. An obs. syn. of celestite. 

SmSRAZOTE. 0. Siltestri, 1876, Pogg Ann., clvii, 165 (Sidera- 
zot), f. cri8r/poif 'iron/ and azote, from its composition. Nitride of 
iron, found as a product of volcanic eruptions. 

SmERBTINB. F, 8. Beudani, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 609, f. aidtfpoi, 
' iron,' and prfziyrf, 'resin,* alluding to its composition and appearance. 
An obs. syn. of pitticite. 

SIDBRTTE. F, 8. Beudant, 1882, Beud. Min., ii. 846 (Sidrose), 
f. a-idr/po?, 'iron.* Changed to siderite by W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. 
Handb. , 499 (Siderit). Carbonate of iron, found in rhombohedral crystals 
or masses, constituting an imporUmt ore of iron. 

Sideiite had several previous uses. First for the phosphate of iron later 
called pharmacosiderite, by T. Bergmann, 1790, Born. Cat. Foss., ii. 281. 

Also by a B. F, v, Moll, 1797, Moll Jahrb., i. 108, for Uie deep 
blue var. of quartz. 

SmSROBORINB. J. J, N. Huot. 1841, Huot Min., i, 290, f. 
triSffpoi, 'iron,' and boron, from its composition. An obs. syn. of 
lagonite. 

SmSROOALOTTB. R. Kirwan, 1794, Eirw. Min., i, 105, f. its com- 
position. An obs. name for ferriferous dolomite. 

SmBROCHALCITB. E. F, QU>ekei\ 1831, Gluck. Min., 840 
(Siderochalcit), f. criStjpo^, ' iron,' and jtaA/cJ?. 'copper, 'from its compo- 
sition according to an incorrect analysis. An obs. syn. of clinoclasite. 

SIBBROCHROMB. J, J, N, Huot, 1841, Huot Min., i, 287. f. 
(riSr^po?, * iron/ and chrome, from its composition. An obs. syn. of 
chromite. 

SIDBROOLBPTB. K B. de 8au89ure, 1794, Jour, de Phys., xlv. 
844, f. criSffpoi, 'iron,' and KXdnretv, * to conceal,' because its color, due 
to iron, disappears when it is heated. An obs. syn. of chrysolite. 

8IDBROOONITB. J, F. L. Eausmann, 1847, Haus. Min., ii. 1806 



SIDBRODOT 248 



:ii»)2i: 



(SiderokoDit), f. criSrfpoi, * iron/ and Korta, * powder,' because, when 
dissolved in acid, a pulverulent residue of iron oxide remains. A var. of 
calcite, colored yellowish-brown by iron. 

SIDBRODOT. A. Breithaupt, 1847, Haid. Ber., i, 6, perhaps f. 
cridrjpoi, 'iron,' and Sottfi, 'a giver,' because an iron ore. A calcif- 
erous var. of siderite. 

8IDBROFBRRITB. J. F, Bahr, 1854, Dana Mhi., 19, f. aiSrfpoi 
' iron,' and ferrum, *iron,' alluding to its composition. A name given 
to native iron found in petrified wood. 

SIDBROGRAPHITB. J. Torrey, 1820, A. J. S., ii, 176, f. criStfpoi, 
* iron, ' and graphite. Considered a native compound of iron and graphite, 
but probably a furnace product. 

8IDBROMBLANB. W. 8. v. Waltershausen, 1853, Walt Yul.. 202, 
f. aidrffioS, *iron/ and //eA.d5, -dvo?, 'black,' from its composition and 
color. A name for obsidian or some similar volcanic glass. 

SIDERONATRTTB. A. Raimondi, 1878, Min. Perou, 288, f . 
aiSTff}o<>y 'iron.' and natrium, 'sodium,' from the bases which it contains. 
Hydrous sulphate of iron and sodium, found in fibrous, yellow masses. 

SIDBROPHTIiLTTB. H. C. Lewis, 1880, Acad. Nat. Sci. Proc, 
254, f. aidrfpo'i, 'iron,' and (pvXXov, *a leaf,* from its composition and 
structure. A black var. of biotite containing much ferrous iron. 

SIDBROPIiBSITB. A, Breithaupt, 1858, Berg. Hut., xvii, 54 
(Sideroplesit), f . oriSr/po?, * iron,' and nXTjaioi, 'neighbor,' because closely 
connected with siderite. A magnesian var. of siderite. 

SIDBROPYRITB. J. F. Henckel, 1725, Henck. Pyr., 114, f. 
aiSffpoS, * iron,' and pyrite. An obs. syn. of pyrite. 

SIDBROSCHISOUTE. F. C. G. Wernekinck, 1824, Pogg. Ann., i, 
387 (Sideroschisolit), f. <riST;8o?y 'iron,' and crxi^etv, 'to split,' because 
it is an iron mica, and Xi^o?. A syn. of cronstedtite. 

SIDEROSB. See siderite. 

SIDEROSILICITB. W. A v. Waltershausen, 1858, Walt. Vul., 237 
(Siderosilicit), f. (riSjjpoS, ' iron,* and silicon, because a silicate containing 
much iron. A hypothetical hydrous silicate of iron and aluminum, 
thought to occur with palagonite. 

SIDBROTANTAUTB. J, F. L. Bausmann, 1847. Haus. Min., ii, 
960 (Siderotantal). f. aidr/poi, * iron,' and tantalite. A syn. of ferro- 
tantalite. 

SIDBROT7L. A. 8chravf, 1891, Geol. Reich. Jahrb., xli, 880, f. 
a-iSrfpoi, ' iron,' and riAoS, ' fibre,' in allusion to its composition and struct- 
ure. Hydrous sulphate of iron found in divergent, fibrous masses. 

SIDBROXBNB. F. Hesseriberg, [1866. Mineral. Notizen, No. 7, 4], 



849 8IMETITB 

1868, Dana Min., 762, probably f. aiSjfpoi, 'iron, 'and ^eroi, 'a guest/ 
because it occurs implanted on crystals of hematite. A syn. of bessen- 
bergite. 

BIEBBRITB. Error for siberite. 

BXEOBURGrrXI. A. V, LomuIx, 1875, Jabrb. Min., 128 (Biegburgit), 
f. Siegburg, Prussia, its locality. A fossil resin found in brown coal. 

SmaSNITZI. J. D. Dana, 1850, Dana Min., 687, f. Siegen, Prussia, 
its locality. A nickeliferous var. of linnsite. 

SiaTBRTTB. C. F. RammeUberg, 1890, Jabrb. Min., ii, 71 (Sigterit), 
f . SigterO, correctly SigtesO, Norway, its locality. At first considered a 
new feldspar, but later decided to be a mixture of albite and elsolite. 

8IQTB8ITB. The correct form of sigterite. 

SILAONTTB. V, Fernandez and 8, Navia, [1873, La Repub., Dec. 
88], 1877, A. J. 8.. xiii, 819, f. Siluo. Mexico, iU locality. Impure 
guano juatite, mixed with native bismuth. 

BILLBOUTB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 4 (SilbOlite), f. Sill- 

bOle, Finland, its locality'. An obs. syn. of actinolite. 

BIIiFBBRam!. M. Weibull, 1888, Geol. FOr. F5rh., vi, 504 (Silf- 
bergit). f. YebterSilfberg, Sweden, its locality. A yar. of dannemorite. 
Iron-manganese amphibole. 

BILICEOUS SINTBR. A popular name for florite. 

SUilCIOFHITB. A, Sehrauf, 1882, Zt. Eryst., vi, 852 (Siliciopbit), 
f. Bilicium and ophite, 'serpentine.' because considered a serpentine 
impregnated with silica. Au alteration product of chrysolite. 

8IUOITB. T, 17um$an, 1843, Pbil. Mng.. 8d, xxii, 190, f. silica, 
because it looks like quartz. An obs. syn. of labradorite. 

BUilCOBOROOALOITB. H. Haw, 1868, Phil. Mag.. 4th, xxxv, 82, 
f. its composition. A syn. of howlite. 

SnJ.TMAWlTB. O. T. Bowen, 1824. A. J. 8., viii, 118, in honor of 
Prof. B. 8illiman. A var. of flbrolite, found in slender crystals, or in 
fibrous masses with separable fibers. 

SUiVANITB. Variant of sylvanite. 

SHiVBR. The native metal as a mineral, usually called native 
silver. 

BIIiirBR-aLANOB. R. Jameson, 1805, Jam. Min., ii, 155, f. the 
earlier form, 8ilberglanzerz, F. J. A, Bainer, 1804, Est. Min., iii, 870. 
A syn. of argentite. 

8ILVBSTRITB. A, d'Achtardi, 1888. Ach. Met., ii, 84, after O. 
Silvestri, who first descril)ed it. A syn. of siderazot. 

SnOBTITB. 0. Helm and ff. ConwenU, 1886. Malpighia, i, (2), 49. f . 
the river Simeto, Sicily, where it was found. A fossil resin near amber. 



SIMLAITB 250 SMAIiTTTB 

SIMIiATTB. A. Schrauf, 1870, Geol. Reich. Verb., 43 (Simlait), f, 
Simla, India, its locality. A syn. of meerschaluminite. 

SIMONYITE. O. Tsehermak, 1870, K. Ak. Wieo, Ix, (1), 718 
(Simonyit), after F. Simony, who discovered its locality. A syn. of 
blOdite. 

8INEANITB. Groerning, Brist. Glos.. 348. f. Neu-Sinka, Sie- 

benbUrgen, its locality. A mixture of galenite, anglesite and sulphur, 
similar to johnstonite. 

SINOPITS J. F. L. Eausmann, 1847, Haus. Min., i, 706 (Sinopit), 
f. Sivoonii, 'a red earth from Sinope.' A clay of brick-red color, 
spotted with white, which adheres to the tongue. 

SINOPIiB. An early name for a brick-red, ferruginous quartz, prob- 
ably f. sinopis, * a red earth.' 

SIPYLITB. J. W. McdleU 1877, A. J. S., 3d, xiv, 397, f. Sipylus, 
one of the children of Niobe, because it contains niobium (columbium). 
Col u HI bate of erbium and the cerium metals. 

SISERSKITE. Variant of sisserskite. 

8ISMONDINE. See sismondite. 

SISMONDITB. A. Delme, 1843, Ann. Ch. Phys., 8d, ix, 388 (Sis- 
moudine), iu liouor of Prof. A. Sismondi. A black var. of chloritoid, 
from Piedmont. 

SISSERSEITB. W. Hatdinger, 1845. Haid. Handb , 558 (Sisserskit). 
f. Sissersk, Ural, its locality. A var. of iridosmine, containing not more 
than thirty per cent of iridium. 

SJOORUFVITB. L. J. Igelstrom, 1892, Geol. F5r. FOrh., xiv, 309 
(SjOgrufvit), f. the Sj5grufvau, Sweden, its locality. Arsenate of man- 
ganese somewhat resembling yellow garnet. 

SKOaBOIilTB. A. E. Nordenskiold, 1855, Nord. Fin. Min., 30 
(SkogbOlit), f. SkogbOle, Finland, its locality. The mineral ordinarily 
called tantalite, but separated from columbite-tantalite on crystallographic 
grounds. 

SKUTTBRUDITB. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 560 (Skut- 
terudit), f. Skutterud, Norway, its locality. Arsenide of cobalt, of gray 
color and brilliant metallic lustre. 

SliATE-SPAR. See scbieferspar. 

SIiOANTTB. J, Meneghini and B. Bechi, 1852, A. J. S., 2d, xiv. 
64, after C. F. Sloane, who owned the mine where it was found. A 
somewhat doubtful zeolitic mineral, found in white, radiated masses. 

8M2IIJTB. Variant of smelite. 

SMAIiTINB. See smaltite. 

8MALTITB. F. S. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 584 (Smaltine). 



BBCARAQD 251 SODA-CHABAZTTE 

because used in the preparation of smalt. Arsenide of cobalt, containing 
also a little iron and nickel. 

8MARAGD. See smaragdite. 

SMARAQDITS. H. B. de Saussure, 1796. Suus. Alp., v, § 1313, f. 
tr^a'pdySoi, *a, ligbt gieeu precious stone,' alluding to its color. A 
tbin, foliated var. of anipbibolc, much resembling green dialluge. 

The name is also used as a syn. of emerald or beryl, from Smurogd, 
* emerald. ' 

SBCARAGDOOHALOmS. J. F. L, Hammann. 1813, Hans. Min., 
iii, 1039 (Smaragdochalzit), f. a-uafjnySoS, ' emerald,' and XaXKoi, 'cop- 
per/ from its color and composition. An obs. syn. of atacamite. 

SMBOTTTB. A. BreiViaupt, 1841, Bi-eit. Huiidb., ii, 844 (Smectit), 
f. a^r/KTii, ' fullers* earth.' One of the clays included under the gen- 
eral name fullers' earth. 

Also used by L. A. Salvetat, 1851, Ann. Ch. Phys., zxxi, 102. A 
greenish and sometimes transparent var. of hallo^'site. 

BMBaMATTTB. C. F. ^\tumann. 1871, Naum. Min., 356 (Smeg- 
matit), f. GnT,y^a, -aroi, * sonp.' liccause of its soap like character. A 
syn. of saponite (montmorillouite). 

SMEUTE. E. F. Glocker, 1845. Jour. Pk. Ch.. xxxv, 89 (Smelit), 
f. crfirjXrf, * soap.* because it feels soapy. An obs. syn. of kaolinite. 

8MITH80NITB. F. 6. Bevdant, 1882. Ik-ud. Min., ii, 854. after 
James Smithson, who had distinguished it from calamine. Carbonate 
of zinc, found in drusy incrustations or in botryoidal or stalactitic forms. 

The names were reversed by II. J. Brooke and W. ff. Miller, 1862, B. 
and M. Min. . 406, where smithsonite is used for the silicate of zinc and cal- 
amine for the carbonate. 

8MOET QUARTZ. A popular name for transparent quartz of a 
smoky color, often used as a gem under the names of smoky topaz and 
cairngorm-stone. 

8MOET TOPAZ. See smoky quartz. 

SNARUBHTE. a. BreiViaupt, 1865. Berg. HQt., zxiv. 864 (Snar- 
umit), f. its locality, Snarum, Norway. A micaceous mineral somewhat 
resembling lepidolite, and probably an alteration product. 

80AP-R00E. Syn. of soapstone. 

80AP8TONE. An early name for massive talc or steatite, because 
ft feels like soap. 

Montmorillouite and saponite are also sometimes called soapstone. 

80DA-ALUM. See meudozite. 

80DA-0HABAZITE. An early syn. of gmelinite, which it resem- 
bles, but it contains soda. 



80DA-OOPPBRA8 252 SORDAVAIiITS 

SODA-COPPBRAS. J. D. Dana, 1844, Daoa Mia., 226, because 
a kind of copperas contaiuiug soda. An obs. syn. of jarosite. 

80DA-FBLD8PAR. See albite. 

80DA-H0RNBLBNDB. See arf vedsonite. 

SODATTB. A. O. Ekeherg. 1807. Afh. i Fis.. ii, 153 (Sodait), f, its 
composition. An obs. syn. of wernerite. 

SODAUTB. T, Thomson, 1811 (read 1810), Roy. Soc. Ed., vi, 387, 
f. sodium, from its composition, and Xi^o^. Chloro-silicate of aluminum 
and sodium, usually blue or bluish gray in color. 

S0DA-MB80TYPB. An obs. syn. of natrolite, which had been in- 
cluded under the general name mesotype. 

SODA-NTTRB. Nitrate of sodium, found as a mineral. 

SODA-SPODUMBNB. J. J. Berzelius, 1824, Berz. Arsb., 160 (Na- 
tron-spodumen), f. its composition, and its resemblance to spodumene. 
The earliest name for oligoclase. 

80IM0NITB. N. J, v. Kokscharow, 1853, Koks. Min., i, 30 (Soi- 
monit), in honor of Senator Soimonov (so called at its locality). Cor- 
undum found in small crystals in gold sund. 

SOIiDANITB. Error for Saldanite. 

SOIiFATARTTB. G. U. SJiepard, 1885, Shep. Min., ii, 187, because 
found In solfataras. An obs. syn. of both alunogen and mendozite. 

SOMBRBRTTB. T. L. Phipson, 1862, Jour. Cb. Soc, xv, 277, f . the 
Sombrero Isl., West Indies, where it was found. One of the several 
names given to hard guano. 

SOMBRVILIilTB. H. J. Brooke, 1824, Ed. Jour. Sci., i, 186, after 
Dr. Somerville, from whom it was received. An obs. syn. of melilite. 

Also used by A. Dufrenoy, 1847, Duf. Min., iii, 147 (Sommervlllite), f. 
Somerville, N. J., its locality. An obs. syn. of chrysocoUa. 

SOMMAITB. A. Breithaupt, 1867, Read. lud. Supp., p. iii (Som- 
mait), probably from Mt. Somma, its locality. A syn. of leucite. 

SOMMARUQAITB. 1878, Bull. Soc. Min., i, 143. Auriferous 
geradorfflte, from Hungary. 

SOMMBRVILLITB. See somervillite. 

80MMITB. J, a DelametTierie, 1795, Delam. T. T., ii, 63, f. Mt. 
Somma, Italy, its locality. An obs. syn. of nephelite. 

SONOMATTB. E. Goldsmith, 187Q, Acad. Nat. Sci. Proc., 263, f. 
Sonoma Co., Cal., where it was found. Hydrous sulphate of aluminum 
and magnesium, closely allied to pickeringite. 

SORDAVAUTB. N. Nordenskiold, 1820. Nord. Bidrag, 86 (Sorda- 
walit), f. Sordavala, Finland, its locality. A volcanic glass, formerly 
considered a mineral. 



SORT 258 SPBRRTLTTB 

SORT. Ptiny, 77. Pliny Hist.. Bk. 34, 80, f. crcS/ou. •vilriol.' of 
Dioieorades, about 50. Dioscor.. Lib. ▼. Cap. 116. Originally a black 
earth impregnated with vitriol; later used for vitriols in general. 

SPADAITE. F. V. Kobell, 1848. K. Ak. MQnch. Anz., xvii. 945 
(Spadait). in honor of L. di Medici-Spada. Hydrous silicate of magne- 
sium, found in amorphous masses of a reddish color. 

SPANGITE. P. Mantatani, [1872. separate publication, Rome, Apl. 
10], 1892. Dana Min.. 581. in honor of Norman Spang, of Pittsburg. Pa. 
A doubtful zeolite, near phillipsite. 

SFANOOLrm. 8. L Penfield, 1890, A. J. S.. 8d, xxxix. 870, after 
Norman Spang, from whom it was received. Chloro-sulphate of copper, 
found in slender, blue crystals, and radiating groups. 

SPANIOLrm. F, V. Kobell, 1853. Eob. Min. Nam.. 98 (Spaniolith). 
f. andvioi, 'rare,' on account of its rarity, and XiBo^. A syn. of 
schwatzite. 

SFARTATTXI. A, Breithattpt, 1858, Berg. HQt., xvii. 58 (Spartait). 
f. Sparta. N. J., its locality. Avar, of calcite containing manganese, 
and turning brown on exposure. 

SPARTAIilTXS. E, J, Chapman, 1848, Chap. Min., 81. f. Sparta. 
N. J., its locality, and Xi^oi. A syn. of zincite. 

SPATHIO IRON. Rome de riele, 1783. De L. Cryst.. iii. 281 (Mine 
de fer spathique). f. /. O. WalUrius, Spathformig Jernmalm. 1747. Wall. 
Min.. 256, in allusion to its sparry appeamnce. A syn. of siderite. 

SPATHOSB IRON. Variant of spathic iron. 

SPATHIOPTRITB. F, v. Sindberger, 1873, K. Ak. MQnch., iii, 
185 (Spathiopyrit), f. airdOr/, *a spatula,* alluding to its shape, and pyrite. 
A syn. of safflorite. 

8PX2AR PYRTTXIS. A. O. Werner, 1806, Reuss Min., iv, 54 (SpUr- 
kies, error for SpSrkies), from its shape. A var. of marcasite, found in 
spear-shaped crystals. 

8PX30E8TONB. Adapted from Speckstein, 'bacon-stone,' an early 
name for talc, because it feels greasy. 

SPX30TAOLB-8TONE. An early popular name for seleuite, alluding 
to its transparency. 

SPECULAR IRON. J. O. WalUrius, 1747, Wall. Min., 259 
(Miuera ferri specularis), f. speculum, 'a mirror,' alluding to its brilliant 
metallic lustre. A popular syn. of hematite. 

SPBCUXjARTTB. From specular iron, of which it is un obs. synonym. 

SPX2RRTUTXI. II, L. Wells, 1889, A. J. S.. 3d. xxxvii, after F. L. 
Sperry, from whom it was received. Arsenide of platinum, found in 
minute crystals with a brilliant, metallic lustre. 



SPX28SARTINII 254 8PINBI. 

SPX3SSARTINB. See spessartite. 

SPXSSSARTTTXS. F, 8. BeucUmt, 1882, Bead. Min., ii, 52 (Spessart- 
ine), f. Spessart, Germany, its locality. MaDganese-aluminum garnet, 
usually (lark red in color. 

SPHiERITE. V. V. Zepharomch, 1867, K. Ak. Wien. Ivi, (1), 24 
(Spharit) on account of its globular form. Hydrous phosphate of alu- 
minum, occurring in globular concretions. 

SPHJEROOOBALTTTE. A. Weisbach, 1877, Jahrb. Berg. Httt. 
Abh., 53 (Spharokobaltit), f. its spheroidal shape and its composition. 
Carbonate of cobalt, found in small, spherical masses, black outside and 
red within. 

SPHATROSIDERITXS. /. F. Z. Hausmann, 1813, Haus. Min., iii, 
1070 (Spharosiderit), f. o-<f>aif3d, ' a ball,' and siderite. A var. of sider- 
ite occurring in spherical concretions, the name being at first applied to 
the mineral siderite itself. 

SPHiEROSTHiBITB. F. 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 120, f. 
a<paipd, 'a ball,' and stilbite. A var. of stilbite, occurring in radiated 
spheres. 

SPHALERITE. R F. Olocker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 17 (Sphalerit), U 
a<pdXep6<5, * delusive,' alluding to its earlier name blende, from blenden, 
' to deceive.' Sulphide of zinc, commonly called zinc-blende. 

8PHENE. R. J, Hauy, 1801, Hatty Min., iii, 81, f. o-0rjv, * a wedge,* 
alluding to the shape of its crystals. A very common syn. of titanite. 

SPHENOCIiASE. F, v. Kobell, 1864, Jour. Pk. Ch., xci, 348 
(Sphenoklas), f. a'<f>?}y, -t/vo?, *a wedge,' and KXav, 'to break,' because 
it breaks into wedge-shaped pieces. A questionable silicate of calcium, 
etc., of yellowish color. 

SPHENOMITE. C. U. 8hepard, 1846, A. J. S., 2d, ii. 880, L 
sphene, and djaoif * one and the same,' from its great i*esemblance to sphene. 
A very obscure silicate found in a meteorite. 

SPHEROSIDERITE. Variant of spheerosiderite. 

SPHEROSTIIiBITB. Variant of sphserostilbite. 

SPHRAQIDITE. D. L. O. KarsUn, 1808, Karst. Tab., 28(Sphragid), 
f. a<pfjayi?y -ido?, * a seal,' because pieces of it, dug for medical uses, were 
stamped with a seal. A clay-like mineral, closely related to cimolite. 

SPHRAQITE. Variant of sphragidile. 

SPIAUTERTTE. A. Breiihaupt, 1862. Berg. Httt., xxi, 98 (Spiau- 
trit), f. spiauter, ' zinc,' alluding to its composition. A syn. of wurtzite. 

SPINEL. A word of obscure origin, but perhaps a diminutive from 
spina, ' a spine,' because at first applied to a mineral occurring in spine- 
shaped crystals. The name of a group of minerals crystallizing in octa- 



SPUSmum .255 STANZAITB 

hedroDS, but particularly applied to the ulumiuate of magDCsium, sometimes 
with iroo, mangauese or chromium. 

SPINBIJTB. Variant of spinel. 

SPINBLLANE. K. W, Nose, 1808, NOgg. Miu. Stud., 109 (Spinel- 
Ian), f. its resemblance to spinel. An obs. syn. of noselite. 

SPINBIiUNB. K, W. Nose, 1808, NOgg. Min. Stud., 95 (Spinellin), 
because it occurs in small, octahedral grains, like spinel. An obs. 
syn. ot titauite. 

SPINBL-RX7BT. See ruby-spinel. 

SPINTHBRB. R, J. Hauy, 1801, Hatty Min., iv, 283, f. aniv^p, 
'a spark,' because its crystals present vivid reflections when moved in the 
light of a candle. An obs. syn. of titan ite. 

SPODIOSTTB. H, V. Tiberg, 1872. Geol. F5r. F5rh., i, 84 (Spodio- 
sit), f. o-ic66to%, * ash-gray,' alluding to its color. A calcium fluo-phos- 
phate, near wagnerite. 

8PODX7BSBNB. B. J. d'Andrada, 1800, All. Jour. Chem.. iv, 80 
(Spodumen), probably f. anoSovuevo^, 'something burned to ashes,' be- 
cause it forms an ash-colored mass when heated before the blowpipe. A 
silicate of aluminum and lithium, found in grayish, prismatic crystals, 
and in cleavable masses. 

SPODUBffBNITB. Variant of spodumene. 

8TAFFBUTB. A. Stein, 1866. Jahrb. Min.. 716 (Staflfelit), f. Staf- 
fel, Germany, its locality. A var. of apatite, found incrusting phos- 
phorite. 

STAGMATTFB. A, Daubrie, 1877, C. R.. Ixxxiv. 69 (Stagmat), f. 
ardyfia, * a drop.' from its mode of occurrence. Ferric chloride, which 
sometimes exudes in drops from the surface of meteoric irons. 

8TANBKITE. J. D, Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 745, after J. Stanek, 
who first described it. The part of pyroretin not soluble in hot alcohol. 

8TANNINB. See stannite. 

STANNITB. F, 8. Beudant, 1882, Beud. Min., ii, 416 (Stannine), f. 
•tannum. 'tin,' from its composition. Sulphide of tin, copper, iron and 
zinc, found in steel-gray masses. 

Also used by -4. BreUhaupt, 1847, Breit. Handb., iii, 772 (Stannit). 
The material of the pseudomorphs of cassiterite after feldspar, found in 
Cornwall. Eng. 

STANNOLTTE. L. A. Necker, 1885, Neck. Min., ii. 289. f. stannum. 
' tin,' alluding to its composition, and Xi^o^. An obs. syn. of cassiterite. 

STANZAITB. M. Flurl, [1806, Uber d. Gebirgsformationen in d. 
kurpfalzbaierlschen Staaten]. 1806, Reuss Min., iv. 186 (Stanzait). f. Mt. 
Stanzen. Bavaria, where it was found. An obs. syn. of andalusite. 



STAR-QUARTZ 256 8TIIINHZ3IUTB 

STAR-QUARTZ. A var. of quartz which exhibits asterism. 

STAR-8APPHIRB. The asteriated var. of sapphire. 

STAR-STONX3. 8ee star sapphire. 

STASSFURTHITX2. Variant of stassfurlite. 

STASSFURTITX2. Q, Rose, 1856, Pogg. Ann., xcvii, 632 (Stassfur- 
lit), f. Stassfurt, Prussia, its locality. A massive var. of boracite. 

STAUROBARYTX2. H. B. de Saussure, 1796, Gall. Min.. 248, f. 
trravpoS, ' a cross,* and baryte, from its cross shaped crystals and its 
composition. An obs. syn. of hurmotome. 

STAUROIiITXS. /. a Delametlierie, 1792, Delam. Sciag. i, 298, f. 
oravpo^, *& cross,' in allusiou to its shape, and XiBoi. Silicate of 
aluminum and iron, of yellowish-brown to dark brown color, found fre- 
quently in cruciform twins. 

Used also by B. Kir wan, 1794, Kirw. Min., i, 282. An obs. syn. of 
harmotome. 

STAUROTIDE. R, J. Uauy, 1797, Jour, des M., vi, 546, f. 
aravpoi, * a cross,' from its earlier name staurollte, of which it is a syn- 
onym. 

STAUROTITX3. Error for staurolite. 

STEARaiLLTTB. A. Meillei, 1862, Duf. Min., i, 205. f. steatites, 
Male/ and argilla, 'clay,' from its appearance. A var. of montmoril- 
lonite. 

STEATARaiLIilTB. E, E, Schmid, [1880, Ber. Med. Nat. Ges. 
Jena, July 9], 1882, Dana Min., App. iii, 115, f. steatite, ' talc,' and ar- 
gilla, 'clay,' from its appearance. A very doubtful silicate of iron, 
aluminum and magnesium, near delessite. 

STEATITE. From steatites. One of the earliest names for soap- 
stone. 

STEATOID. E. F. Qlocker, 1839, Glock. Min. , 416, f. ite resem- 
blance to steatite. A name given to the material of the serpentine pseu- 
domoiphs from Snarum, Norway. 

STEELEITE. IT. How, 1878, Min. Mag., ii, 139 (Steelite), after 
Joseph Steele, who first found it. Changed to steeleite by the author, 1878, 
Min. Mag., ii, 251. An altered mordenite, found in balls of pink or 
chalk-white color. 

STEELITE. See steeleite. 

STEEL-ORE. An early name for siderite. 

STEENSTRUPINE. J. Lorenzen, [1881, Medd. GrSnl.], 1882, Min. 
Mag. , v, 67, after Prof. K. J. V. Steenstrup, who discovered it. Hy- 
drous silicate of the cerium metals, near melanocerite. 

STEINHEILITE. J, Qadolin, 1814, Acad. St. Pet. Mem., vi.. 



STBINMANNITE 257 STTBERITB 

565, in houor of Graf F. v. Steinheil, Gov. €kii. of FinUtDd. An obs. 
syu. uf ioliie. 

STBINMANNTTE. F. X, M. Zippe, [1888, Verb. Gcs. des vulerl. 
Mils, in BObmen, 89], 1889, Mobs Nat., ii, 545 (Steiuumuuit), in boiior of 
Prof. J. J. Steiumann. A var. of galenite, contMin^ ig arsenic and anti- 
mony. 

STBLIiAR COAL. See stellarite. 

STBLLARTTE. K Haw, 1869, Min. Nova Soot., 24. f. stellaris, 
* starry,' because stars of fire drop from it wben burning. A vur. of 
aspbultum, called also stellar coal. 

STEIiUTB. T, TJiomton, 1888, Glock. Jabres., 147 (Stellit), f. 
Stella, * a star,' alluding to its radiated crystals. An obs. syn. of pecto- 
lite. 

STEPHANTTB. W. Uaidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 570 (Stepbauit), 
in bonor of Arcbduke Stepban of Austria. Sulpb-antimonide of silver, 
black in color and very brittle. 

8TEPHBNSONITB. C. U. Shepard, 1859, Kept Mt. Pisgab, 8, in 
bonor of Dr. M. F. Stepbenson, of Gainesville, Ga. ' A bydro-sulpbo- 
carbouate of copper, of a cbrysopitisegreen color,' never fully de- 
scribed. 

STBRCORITB. T. J. Herepath, 1850 (read 1849), Jour. Cb. Soc., 
ii, 78, f. stercorare, * to dung,' because found in guano. Hydrous pbos- 
pliate of sodium and ammonia. 

STERLINQITB. F, Alger, 1844, Alger Pbil., 565. f. Sterling Hill, 
N. J., its locality. Also written stirlingite, tbe name of tbe locality being 
spelled in botb wa3rs. An obs. syn. of zincite. 

Also used by J. P. Cooke, 1874, Am. Acad. Mem., iz, 89, f. Sterling, 
Mass., its locality. A var. of damourite. 

STBRNBBRGITB. W. HaicUnger, 1827 (read 1826), Ed. Jour. Sci., 
vii, 242, in honor of 0)unt Caspar Sternberg. Sulphide of silver and 
iron, found usually in dark brown crystals. 

STETBFBLDnTB. E. N. BiotteASQl, Berg. HQt., xxvi, 253 
(Stetefeldtit), in bonor of C. A. Stetefeldt. An uncertain antimonial 
compound, containing also silver and copper. 

STEVBNITB. Error for stevensite. 

8TBVBNSITB. A. R. Leeds, 1889, L. Hour, xii, 81, in honor of E. 
A. Stevens, founder of tbe Stevens Institute. This name was suggested 
in 1878, at a meeting of tbe N. Y. Lyceum of Natural History, but not 
published, though soon after used on labels. Talc, peeudomorphous 
after pectolite. 

STIBERITB. H. How, 1892, Eg. Cat. Min., 828 (from labels in the 



STIBIAFBRRmS 258 8TIBNITB 

School of Mines collection), perhaps f. arifirf, * frost/ and boron, in allu- 
sion to its appearance and composition. Spelled also stiborite. A var. 
of ulexite occurring as a soft coating on gypsum. 

STTBIAFERRITE. E. Goldsmiih, 1873, Acad. Nat. Sci. Proc, 366, 
f . stibium, * antimony,' and femim, ' iron,' alluding to its composition. 
An amorphous yellow coating on stibnite, containing antimonic and ferric 
oxides, and water. 

STIBIANITB. E. Oold9mith, 1878, Acad. Nat. Sci. Proc. 154, f. 
stibium, * antimony,' in allusion to its composition. Impure antimonic 
acid resulting from the alteration of stibnite. 

SnBIATIL. Z. /. IgeUtrom, 1889, Geol. F5r. F5rh., xi, 891, f. 
stibium, 'antimony,' and riXoS, 'a fibre,' from its composition and struc- 
ture. An uncertain antimonate of manganese and iron. 

STIBICONI8Z2. See stibiconite. 

8TIBICONITB. F. 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 616 (Stibico- 
nise), f. stibium, 'antimony,' and Kovii, 'powder,' because it is an oxide 
of antimony often found as a powder ; differing from cervantite, with 
which it has often been confounded, in containing a few per cent of 
water. 

STIBIUTE. Variant of stiblite. 

STIBINX2. F. 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 421, f. stibium, 
'antimony,' from its composition. A syn. of stibnite. 

STTBIOFXIRRITX3. Variant of stibiaferrite. 

STIBIOGAIiBNITE. B. F. Qlocker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 257 (Stibio- 
galenit), f. stibium, 'antimony,' alluding to its composition, and galena (its 
tribe name). An obs. syn. of bindheimite. 

STIBIOHBZARaENTTTB. T. Petersen, 1869, Pogg. Ann., cxxxvii, 
882 (Stibiohexargentit), f. stibium, 'antimony,' and argentum, 'silver,* 
from its composition. One of the two species into which the author 
divides dyscrasite, the other being stibiotriargentite. 

STIBIOIiITE. Variant of stiblite. 

STIBIOTANTAIilTIS. O, A, Ooyder, 1893, Jour. Ch. Soc.. x, 76, f. 
its composition. A tantalate of antimony, found in water- worn pebbles, 
with tin ore. 

STIBIOTRIARaBNTTTE. See stibiohexargentlte. 

8TIBITE. Probably au error for stiblite. 

8TIBIJTB. /. i?. Blum and F. W. H, Delffs, [1846, Jahrb. Pk. 
Pharm., xiii. 65], 1847, Jour. Pk. Ch., xl, 318 (Stiblith). f. stibium, » anti- 
mony,' alluding to its composition, and XiBoi, An obs. syn. of stibico- 
nite. 

8TIBNITB. J, D, Dana, 1854, Dana Min., 83, adapted f. stibine of 



STmORTTB 258 STONB-FLAZ 

Beudant. Sulphide of antimouy, fouud massive, and in steel gray crys- 
tals of brilliant metallic lustre. 

STIBORTTB. See stiberite. 

STIGBAITXI. An old name, 1775» Arg. Oryct., 283, probably f. 
ariymx, 'a mark,' for a var. of caruelian or agate showing decided vein- 
iiigs or markings. Stygmite, 1861, Brist. Gloss., 866, is probably the same. 

STILBINB. Error for stibine. 

STILBTTB. R, J, Hauy, 1796. Jour, des M., v, 276. f. ariXpeiy, 
* to shine,' or f. ariXfiff, * a mirror,' ou account of its brilliant lustre. 
Hydrous silicate of aluminum and calcium, found often in sheuf-like 
Aggregations of crystals, aud with a pearly lustre Under this name 
heulandite was at first included. 

STILIiOUTE. E, F, Qlocker, 1881, Glock. Min., 724 (Stillolilh), f. 
stillere, ' to trickle/ in allusion to its mode of formation, and XBoi. An 
obs. name for siliceous sinter. 

8TILPNOMBLANE. E. K Oloeker, [1827, Beit. zurMin. Eenntn. 
d. Sudetenlander. (1), 68], 1881, Glock. Min., 572 (Stilpnomelan), f. 
crtXxyoi, 'shining,' and ^tX&i^ -dyo^, 'black,' in allusion to Its appear- 
ance. Hydrous silicate of iron and aluminum, occurring in black plates 
or a velvety -bronze coating. 

• STIIiPNOSIDBRITB. /. C. Ullmann, 1814, Ullm. Tab.. 148 
(Stilpnosiderit), f. artXitrdi, 'shining.' and aiSifpoS, 'iron,' because it 
is an ore of iron sometimes exhibiting a brilliant lustre. An obs. syn. of 
limonite. 

STINK-QUARTZ. A var. of quartz, which emits a fetid odor when 
struck. 

STINESTONB. A black var. of marble, which gives out a fetid 
odor when struck. 

STIRIAN. A. Breithaupi, 1885. Jour. Pk. Ch.. iv, 264. f Styria. the 
country where it was found. An obs. name for nickel-bearing marcasite. 

STIRIilNQITB. A. Kenngott, 1872, Jahrb. Min. , 188 (Stirlingit), f. 
Stirling (Sterling) Hill, N. J., its locality. A syn. of roepperite. 

See also sterlingite. 

STOIiPBNTTB. A, Kenngott, 1858, Eenng. Min., 41 (Stolpenit). f. 
Stolpen, Saxony, its locality. A var. of montmorillonite. 

STOLZITB. TT. ffaidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 504 (Stolzit), after 

Dr. Stolz. of Teplitz, who brought it to notice. Tungstate of lead, 

found in crystals of various colors, with resinous lustre. 

8TONB-BUTTBR. A kind of clay said to have been used instead 
of butter. 

STONB-FLAX. An early name for asbestos. 



8TRAHLITB 260 8TRONTIANITB 

STRAHLITB. H. J. Brooke, 1828, Brooke Cryst., 458, f. Btrahlstein, 
its earlier name. An obs. syn. of actinolite. 

8TRAKONITZITB. V. v. Zepharomch, 1858, Geol. Reich. Jahrb.. 
iv, 700 (Strakonitzit), f. Strakonitz, Bohemia, its locality. An altered 
pyroxene, near steatite. 

8TRAUTB. Variant ot strahlite. 

8TRATOPBITB. L. J, Igelstr(>m, 1851, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., vii. 
148 (Stratopeit), f . stratum, and ireiBapxio:, ' obedience,' because arranged 
in a regular way (according to law), in layers. A syn. of neotocite. 

STRAW-8TONB. A syn. of carpholite, of which it is a translation. 

8TREAM-TIN. An early name for cassiterite when found mixed 
with gravel in the bed of streams. 

8TRBIiITB. T, Tliomson, 18:i6, Thom. Min., i, 206, probably f. 
Strahl. *a ray/ alluding to its structure. An obs. syn. of anthophyllite. 

8TRBNaiTB. A. Nies, 1877, Jahrb. Min., 8 (Strengit), in honor of 
Prof. A. Streng. Hydrous phosphate of iron, found as a drusy incrus- 
tation of a red color. 

8TRIBaiSAN. A. BreWiaupt. 1880, Breit. Uib., 87, f. Langen- 
striegis, Saxony, its locality. An obs. syn. of wavellite. 

8TRIGOVITB. B, Becker and M, Websky, 1869, Jahrb. Min., 28& 
(Strigovit), f. Slreigau, Silesia, its locality. A chlorite-like mineral, 
found in aggregati(>ns of minute green crystals. 

8TROaANOVITB. . R. Hermann, 1845. Jour. Pk. Ch., xxxiv, 177 
(Stroganowit), in honor of Count A. G. Stroganov. An altered scapo- 
lite, found in large yellowish or green crystals. 

8TROMETERINB. See stromeyerite. 

8TROMETBRITB. F, 8. Bevdant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 210 (Stro* 
meyerine), after Fr. Stromeyer, who analyzed it. Sulphide of silver and 
copper, of steel-gray color and metallic lustre. 

8Tr6mITB. H. J. Brooke, 1836. Phil. Mag., 3d, viii, 169, probably 
in honor of P. Strdm, of Sweden. An obs. syn. of rhodocrosite. 

8TROMMITB. Error for stromnite. 

8TROMNITB. S. Traill, 1819 (read 1817), Ed. Phil. Jour., i, 880, f. 
Stromness, Orkney Isl., its locality. A var. of strontianite, containing 
mechanically mixed barite. 

STRONTHIANITB. Variant of strontianite. 

STRONTTAN. A syn. of strontianite. 

STRONTIANTTB. Suher, [1790, Lichtenberg's Mag. Phys. 

und Nat., vii, 68], 1791, Berg. Jour., i, 438 (Strontianit), f. Strontian, 
Scotland, its locality. Carbonate of strontium, found in orthorombic 
crystals or in marble-like masses. 



STFONTIANOOAIiOITS 261 SUOOINBLUTB 

8TRONTIANOOAI.OITB. F. A, Oenth, 1852, Acad. Nat. Sci. 
Proc., vi, 114, f. its composition. A var. of calcite containing carbonate 
of strontium. 

STRUVBITB. Variant of struvite. 

8TRUVERITB. A. Brezina, 1876, K. Ak. Wien Anz., 101 (StrU- 
verit), in honor of Prof. G. BtrUver, of Rome. A syn. of chloritoid. 

8TRUVITB. O. L. UUx, 1846, Vet. Ak. Slock. Oefv.. iii, 32 

(Stnivit), in honor of von Struve, the Russian minister at Hamburg. 

Hydrous phosphate of ammonium and magnesium, found in small yellow- 
ish-brown or grayish crystals. 

STUBBUTB. A. Breithanpi, 1865, Berg. HUt, xxiv, 822(Stllbelit), 
after Dr. A. Stabel, who described it. Hydrous silicate of copper, 
manganese, aluminum and iron. 

8TUDBRITB. B. L, v. Fellenberg, [IS^ Nat. Oes. Bern. Mitth., 
178], 1868, Eenng. Ueb. for 1862-5, 298 (Studerit). in honor of Prof. B. 
Studer. A var. of tetrahedritc, containing arsenic and zinc. 

STUTZTTB. A. Sehrauf, 1878, Zt. Kryst., ii, 252 (SlUtzit), after A. 
StUtz. who had described a similar mineral. A doubtful silver telluride, 
named from a single specimen. 

STUVBNITB. L, Darapaky, [1886. Verb. Wissen. Vereins, Santi- 
ago, 105], 1887, A. J. B., 8d, xxxiii, 80, in honor of E. StQven. Hydrous 
sulphate of aluminum, sodium and magnesium, a native alum, from Chili. 

8TTG1IAITB. See stigmite. 

8TTLOBAT. A, BreUhaupt, 1816, Leon. Tasch., x, (2), 600, f. 
arvko-pdrtfi, * the base of a column,' alluding to the form of its crystals. 
An obs. syn. of gehlenlte. 

STTIiOBITB. Error for stylobat. 

STYIiOPTYPITB. Error for stylotvplte. 

STYLOTYPITB. F, «. Kobell. 1865, K. Ak. MUnch. Ber., i, 168 
(Stylotyp), f. (TTvXoit 'a column,' and rvno^, 'form,* in allusion to the 
columnar form of its crystals. Sulph-antimonide of copper, silver and 
iron, found in iron-black crystals. 

STYPTBRTTB. E, F, Oloeker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 297 (Stypterit), f. 
OTvicrrfpia, 'an astringent salt.' An obs. syn. of alunogen. 

STYPnOITB. J. F L. ffauimann, 1847, Haus. Min., ii, 1202 
(Stypticit), f. CTvxTtKoS, 'astringent,' alluding to its taste. An obs. 
syn. of fibroferrite. 

SUBDBLBSSITB. E. Weiss, 1879, Zt. Geol., xxxi, 801 (Subdeles- 
sit), because considered a var. of delessite. A syn. of delessite. 

SUCOINBLIJTB. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 748, modified f. 
Buccinum, ' amber,' and A.i9oS. Succinic acid obtained from amber. 



SUOOINITB 262 BUS&BTSTB 

SnOOINITXS. B. Bonwisin, 1807, Brong. Min.. ii. 406, f. succinum, 
'nmber/ in allusion to its color. An amber-colored var. of grossu- 
larite. 

Also used by A. Breithaupt, 1820, Brett. Char., 76 (Succinit), f. succin 
of R. J. Hauy, 1796, Jour, des M., ▼, 341. The mineral name of amber. 

SUIiFATAIiLOPHANZ]. T.Muek, [1880, Zt. f. Berg-u. Salin.,xzviU, 
192], 1881, Jahrb. Min.. i, 25 (Sulfatallophan), because it is a var. of allo- 
phane containing sulphuric acid. 

SUIiFURIOIN. H. T. Quyard, [1874, 8oc. Chem. Bull., xxil. 61], 
1876, Min. Mitth., 243, because it contains sulphur. Amoi-phous silica 
impregnated with sulphur and sulphuric acid. 

SULPHAirrXS. /. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 614, f. its composi- 
tion. Liquid sulphuric acid found in nature. 

BULPHOBORITB. H. Backing, 1893, Ak. Ber. Monatsber., 967 
(Sulphoborit), f. its composition. Hydrous sulpho-borate of magnesium, 
found in minute, water-clear crystals. 

SULPHOHAUTB. W. E. Hidden and /. B. MaekirUosh, 1888, A. 
J. S., 3d, xxxvi, 464, f. its composition. Chloro- sulphate of sodium, 
found in greenish-yellow transparent crystals. 

8ULPHO-SBLBNITB. C. U. Shepard, 1885, Shep. Min., (2), ii, 215. 
f. its composition. An obs. syn. of selensulphur. 

SULPHUR. Native sulphur as a mineral. 

8ULPHURICIN. Varian t of suf uricin. 

8UNADIN. Error for sanidine. 

SUNDOIUiTB. Error for sundvikite. 

SUNDTTTE. W. C. Brdgger, 1892. Zt. Kryst, xxi, 193 (Sundtit), 
after L. Sundt, who discovered it. Sulph-antimonide of silver and iron, 
found in steel-gray crystals and masses. 

SUNDVIQITB Error for sundvikite. 

SUNDVIEITB. IT. NoTdenskiold, 1855, Nord. Pin. Min., 113{Bund- 
vikit), f. Nordsundvik, Finland, its locality. Altered anorthite, similar 
to lindsayite. 

8UNDVILEITB. Error for sundvikite. 

8UNSTONB. An early name for feldspar, showing brilliant orange- 
yellow reflections; usually orthoclase. but sometimes oligoclase. 

8USANNITB. TT. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 505 (Suzannit), 
f. the Susanna mine, Leadhill, Scotland, its locality. Bulphato-carbon- 
ate of lead very near leadhillite. 

8USSEZITB. Q.J, Brush, 1868, A. J. S., 2d, xlvi, 14, f. Sussex 
Co., N. J., its locality. Hydrous borate of manganese and magnesium, 
found in white, fibrous masses. 



SVABITS 263 STNTAGMATm] 

SVABTTE. H, Sjogren, 1891, Geol. FOr. F5rh., xiii. 789 (Svnbil), in 
honor of A. von Svab. Hydrous arsenate of calcium, found in color- 
less crystals and fibrous aggregivtions. 

SVANBBRGITB. L, J, Igelsirom, 1854, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., xi, 
156 (Svanberglt), in honor of Prof. L. F. Svanberg. Sulphatopbospbate 
of aluminum and calcium, found in small, highly colored crystals. 

Also used by 0, U, Shepard, 1857, Shep. Min., 803. An obs. syn. 
of iridium. 

SWINBSTONII. An early name for anthraconite. on account of its 
fetid odor when struck. 

STOHNODTMTTXI. ff. Laspeyrea, 1891, Zt. Kryst., xix, 17 (Sych- 
nodymit), f. <Tvxy6?, 'many,* equivalent to JtoXvS, 'many,* a related 
mineral being called polydymite. . Sulphide of copper, cobalt and 
nickel, near carroUite. 

STEPOORTTB. See jaipurite. 

8YHADRITB. Error for sybedrite. 

STHEDRTTB. C. U. Sliepard, 1865, A. J. S., 2d, zl, 110, f. the 
Sybedree Mts., Bombay, its locality. A syn. of stilbite. 

STLVANX2. Bee sylvauite. 

SYIiVANmi. F. 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min., ii, 542 (Sylvane), 
because tbe element tellurium bad been called sylvanite by R. Kirtoan, 
1796, Kirw. Min., ii, 324, f. Transylvania, where its ores were found. 
Native telluride of gold and silver. 

STIiVINE. See sylvite. 

STIiVinrrB. The commercial name for sylvite. 

SYLVITB. F. 8. Beudant, 1832, Beud. Min.. 511 (Sylvine), f. its 
chemical name sal digestivus Sylvii. Chloride of potassium, found in 
cubes similar to common salt. 

SYMPLE8ITB. A, Breithnupt, 1837, Jour. Pk. Ch., x. 501 (Sym- 
plesit), f. avf.ntX.Tjo'tci^eiv, *io be associated with,' because of its close 
relationship with otber minerals. Hydrous arsenate of iron, found in 
green, prismatic crystals. 

STNADELPHmi. A. Sjogren, ^884, Geol. F5r. FOrh., vii. 882 
(Synadelphit). f. auv, 'together with,' and dSe\<p6^, ' i\ brother,' because 
found with other similar minerals. Hydrous arsenate of manganese and 
aluminum, found in black, prismatic crystals. 

STNGBNITB. F. v. Zepharovieh, 1872, Lotos, 137 (Syngenit), f. 
avyyev?}?, ' related,' because of its close relation to polyhalite. Hydrous 
sulpbate of calcium and potassium, found in small, colorless or white, 
tabular crystals. ' 

STNTAaMATTFB. A, Breithaupt, 1866, Berg. Hut., xxiv. 428 



8ZABOITB 264 TiENITB 

(Syntagmatit), f. avvrayina, 'an arrangement/ in allusion to the sheaf- 
like aggregations of its crystals. A syn. of pargasite. 

8ZABOITB. A. Koch, 1878, Min. Mitth., i, 77 (Szaboit). in honor 
of Prof. J. Szabo. A somewhat altered hypersthene, found in thin, 
tabular crystals. 

SZAIBXSIiYITE. K. F, Peters, 1861, K. Ak. Wien, xliv, 143 

(Szaibelyit), after Szajbely, who first obtained it. Hydrous borate 

of magnesium, found in kernels in limestone. 

SZASKAITX2. T, A. Readwin, 1867, Read. Index, 88. f. Szaska, 
Hungary, its locality. An obs. syn. of smithsonite. 

SZMIKITX3. T. V. 8chrdckinger, 1887, Geol. Reich. Verb., 116 
(Szmikit), after I. Szmik, from whom it was received. Hydrous sul- 
phate of manganese, of a reddish-white color. 

TABASHX3BR. From tnbSshlr, its Arabic name. Amorphous, 
opaline silica, found in the joints of bamboo. 

TABERQITE. Th. ScTieerer, 1847, Pogg. Ann., Ixxi, 448 (Tabergit), 
f. Taberg, Sweden, its locality. A chlorite-like mineral, classed with 
both clinochlore and penninite, probably a mixture of one of these with 
phlogopite. 

TABXjE-SPAR. See tabular spar. 

TABULAR SPAR. A. Stutz, [1793. Neue Einr. d. K. K. Naturalien- 
sammluug, viii, 144], 1801, Reuss. Min., (2), i, 435 (Tafelspath), alluding to 
the shape of its crystals. A syn. of wollastonite. 

TAOHHTDRITE. See tachydrite. 

TAOHTAPHAIiTITE. P. C. Weibye, 1853, Pogg. Ann., Ixxxviii, 
160 (Tachyaphaltit), f. raxy^, 'quick,' and a<pLxXro?, 'springing off,* 
because it so easily flies from its gangue when struck. An altered 
zircon, containing ten per cent of water. 

TAOHTDRITB. C, F. RammeUhei'g, 1856, Pogg. Ann., xcviii, 261 
(Tachhydrlt), f. rdxv?. 'quick,* and vSaofj, 'water,* because it deliquesces 
so easily. Hydrous chloride of calcium and magnesium. 

TAOHTHTDRITX2. Variant of tachydrite. 

TAOHYLYTB. A. BreWiaupt, 1826, Arch. Ges. Nat., vii, 112 
(Tachylyt), f. rdxv^t 'quick.' and Xvr6?y 'soluble,' because of its easy 
fusibility. A black, basaltic glass, formerly regarded as a homogeneous 
mineral. 

TJENITE. E. mtchcock, 1841, Geol. Mass., ii, 676, f. ratvia, 'a 
ribbon.' from its resemblance to a ribbon. A var. of feldspar, occurring 
in striped crystals. 

Also used by K. v. ReicTienbach, 1861, Pogg. Ann., cxiv, 250 (Tftnit). 
A part of meteoric iron earlier called Ban deisen, from the shape of its crystals. 



TAaiUTXI 265 TANKITE 

TAGniTTB. R, Hermann, 1846, Jour. Pk. Ch., xxxvii, 184 (Tagi- 
lith), f. Nischni Tagilsk, Urals, its locality, and Xi^o<;. Hydrous phos- 
phate of copper, found in monoclinic crystals and spheroidal concretions. 

TAI.O. O. Agricola, 1546, Agric, 480 (Talk), f. Arabic talg. 
Hydrous silicate of magnesium called also soap-stone and steatite. 

TAIiC APATTTB. R. Hermann, 1844. Jour. Pk. Ch., xxxi, 101 
(Talkapatit), because it looks like apatite, but contains talkerde (magnesia). 
An altered apatite containing considerable magnesia. 

TAI.C CHLORITB. A. Des CUmeaux, 1862, Des CI. Min., i. 451. 
A chloritic mineral considered to be between talc and chlorite. 

TAIiOTTB. R. Kirwan, 1794, Eirw. Min., i. 149. The compact, 
scaly var. of talc. 

Also used by T. Thomson, 1886, Rec. Gen. Sci., iii, 882, f. its resem- 
blance to talc. A syn. of daraourite. 

TAIiCOID. C. F. Naumann, 1859, Naum. Min., 255 (Talkoid), be- 
cause similar to talc. A snow-white, foliated var. of talc. 

TAI.OOSITE. O. K F, UlricK [1870. Contrib. Min. Victoria], 1870, 
A. J. S., 2d, 1. 272. A talc-like mineral, found in silver-white scales. 

TATiKTREPLITB. L, J. IgeUtrdm, 1882, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., 
xxzix, (2), 86 (Talktriplit), because it is a var. of triplite containing mag- 
nesia, nayvffTi^ XiBoi being an old name for talc. 

TALIilNOITB. A. H. ChureU, 1865, Jour. Ch. Soc. xviii, 214, 
after R. Tailing, from whom it was obtained. Hydrous chloride of cop- 
per, near atacamite. 

TAItTALTTE. /. Dtmeyko, 1860, Min. Chili, 139. f. Taltal. Chili, 
its locality. An obs. syn. of tourmaline. 

TAMARTTB. H, J. Brooke and W, H. Miller, 1852. B. and M. Min., 
512, f. Huel Tamar, its locality. An obs. syn. of chalcophyllite. 

TAMARUaiTB. H. Sehulu, [1889, Verb. Wissen. Vereins Santi- 
ago, ii, 56], 1890, A. J. S., 8d, xl, 258, f. the pampas del Tamarugal. 
Hydrous sulphate of aluminum and sodium, a sodium alum. 

TAMMELA-TANTAIJTB. J. D. Dana, 1844, Dana Min., 488. 
The tantalite from Tammela, Finland, now called skogbOlite. 

TAMMITB. Wm. Crookes, 1872, Chem. News, xxvi, 18, after H. 
Tamm, who first examined it. A name for the substance earlier called 
ferrotungsten. 

TANGAWATTB. F. Bertoerth. 1879, K. Ak. Wien Ber., Ixxx, (1), 
116 (Tangawai), the Maori name of the stone. A var. of serpentine from 
Kew Zealand, closely resembling bowenite. 

TANKBLITE. Variant of tankite (xenotime). 

TANKITE. A. Breithaupi, 1829, Jour. Ch. Ph., Iv, 246 (Tankit), 



TANNENITB 266 TAUTOOLIK 

perhaps in honor of Prof. J. Tank of Leipsic. Breithaupt received it with 
this name attached. An obs. syn. of anorthite. 

Also used by W. ffaidinger, 1845, Haid. Ueb. for 1843, 24, after 

Tank, Jr., who discovered it. An obs. syu. of xenotime. 

TANNENITIS. /. 2>. Dana, 1854, Dana Min., 73, f. Tannenbaum, 
Saxon}', its locality. An obs. syu. of emplectite. 

TANTALITIS. A. G. Ekeberg, 1802, Vet. Ak. Stock., xxiii, 80 
(Tautalit), f. Tantalus, because so difficult to dissolve. Tantalate of iron, 
found in black, lustrous crystals. 

Tapiolite has been included under tautalite. 

TAPALPITB. P. L. Monroy, 1869, Naiurleza, i, 77, f. the Sierra 
de Tapalpa, where it was found. Sulpho-telluride of bismuth and sil- 
ver, found in gray, metallic masses. 

TAPIOIilTE. A. E. Nardenskiold, 1863, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv. xx, 
445 (Tapiolit), after Tapio, a Finnish deity, and XiSo?. Columbo-tan- 
talate of iron, resembling tantalite, but containing no manganese. 

TARANAKITE. /. Hector, [1865, Juror's Kept. N. Z. Expos., 423], 
1882, N. Z. Inst., Trans., xv, 385, f. Taranaki, N. Z., its locality. A 
hydrous phosphate of aluminum, resembling wavellite. 

TARAPACAITX3. A. Raimxmdi, 1878, Min. Perou, 274^ f. Tara- 
paca, Peru, where it was found. Potassium chromate, occurring in 
minute, yellow crystals in soda nitre. 

TARA8PITX2. C. v. John, 1891, Geol. Reich. Verb., 67 (Taraspit), f. 
Tarasp, Switz., its locality (probably a local name). A syn. of miemite. 

TARaiONITXS. E. Bechi, 1852, A. J. 8., 2d, xiv, 62 (Jargionite, 
error), in honor of J. Targioni-Tozzetti. A var. of galenite containing 
antimony. 

TARNOVIOITB. Variant of tarnowitzite. 

TARNOWrrZITB. A. Breithaupt, 1841, Breit. Handb., ii, 252 (Tar- 
novizit), f. Tarnowitz, Prussia, its locality. A var. of aragonite, con« 
tain in g lead carbonate. 

TA8MANITB. A. H, Church, 1864. Phil. Mag., 4th. xxviii, 465, f. 
Tasmania, where it was found. A resinous hydrocarbon containing 
sulphur, occurring in reddish-brown scales. 

TAURISOITB. Q. H. 0. Volger, 1855, Jahrb. Min., 152 (Tauriszit), 
f . Pagus Tauriscorum, the ancient name of its locality. Ferrous sulphate, 
like copperas, but occurring in acicular crystals. 

TAUTOOUN. A. Breithaupt, 1830, Breit. Uib., 20 (Tautokliner 
Karbon Spath), f. ravro', 'the same,' and kXivciv, *to incline,* because 
it has the same rhombohedral angle as dolomite. A grayish-white var. 
of ankerite. 



TAUTOLira 267 TUNNANTTTE 

TAUTOLmi. A, BreiihaupU 1826, Jour. Ch. Ph., 1,321 (Tauto- 
lith), adupted from rcruro-^erpoS, *of the same measure,' referring to a 
supposed nxial relation, and Xffioi, An obs. syn. of allanite. 

TAVISTOOmTB. J, B. Dana, 1868, Dana Min.. 582, f. Tavistock, 
Devonshire, its locality. Hydrous phosphate of aluminum and calcium, 
found in microscopic acicular crystals. 

TATLORITB. /. B. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 614, after W. J. Tay- 
lor, who analyzed it. Sulphate of potassium and ammonium, found in 
small concretions. 

TAZBWEIXITB. S, Meunier, 1893. Menu. Fers Met., 48, f. Taze- 
well, Tenn., where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 

TAZNTTB. /. Dameyko, 1877, C. R. Ixxxv, 977, f. Tazna, Bolivia, 
its locality. An uncertain arsenate of bismuth, found in yellow, fibrous 
masses. 

TBOnOITB. A. BreUTiaupt, 1841, Breit. Handb., ii, 121 (Tecticites 
ferricus), f. tt^ktikoS, 'able to dissolve,' because it deliquesces easily. 
Never fully examined, but probably hydrous ferric sulphate. 

TBEORJEiTIN. /. O. Forchhammer, [1839. Kong. Dan. Vid. Sols \ 
1840, Jour. Pk. Ch., xx. 459, probably f. TyjKetv^ • to dissolve,' \\m\p}jrivrj^ 
' resin,' because separated by solution in hot alcohol. A resin similar to 
flchtelite, probably identical with it. 

TBLASPTRINB. C. U. Shepard, 1882, Diina Min. App.. iii, 119, 
f. tellurium, arsenic and pyrite. A var. of pyrite supposed to contain 
tellurium and arsenic. 

TBIiESIA. R. J. Hauy. 1796. Jour, des M., v, 256 (Teldsie), f. 
reXeiy, * to make perfect,' because of its perfection. An obs. syn. of 
sapphire. 

TBIXURIO BISMUTH. /. /. Bereeltus, 1828, Yet. Ak. Stock., 
188 (Tellurbunden-Wismuth), f. its composition. An obs. syn. of 
tetradymite. 

TELLURIC OOHRB. A syn. of tellurite. 

TBLLURIO 8ILVBR. G. Rose, 1880, Pogg. Ann., xviii, 64 
(Tellursilber), f. its composition. An obs. syn. of hessite. 

TBLLURTTE. /. Nicol, 1849, Nicol Min., 429, f. its composition. 
Native oxide of tellurium, found in minute, whitish or 3'ellow crystals. 

TBLLUKIUM. Native tellurium foimd as a mineral. 

TBLLURIUM-GLANOB. A syn. of nagyagite. 

TBNGBRITB. /. D. Dana. 1868. Dana Min., 710. after C. Tengcr. 
who examined it. Carbonate of 3rttrium, found as a thin, white coating 
on gadolinite. 

TBNNANTTTB. TF. and R. PhiUips. 1819. Quar. Jour., vii, 95. in 



TBNORITB 268 TBTRAHBDRITS 

honor of Smithson Tennant Sulph-arsenide of copper and iron, closely 
related to tetrahedrite. 

TBNORITB. G. Semmola, [1841. Opere Minori, 45], 1841-42, Soc. 
Geol. Fr. Bull., xiii, 206, in honor of Prof. G. Tenore, President of the 
Naples Academy. Black oxide of copper, found in thin, iron-black 
scales. 

TBPHROITB. A, Breithaupt, 1828, Breit. Char., 278 (Tephroit), f. 
T€<f>p6i, 'ash-colored.' Silicate of manganese, of an ash-gray color, 
sometimes inclined to reddish. 

TBPHROWUiLBMITB. G, A. Koenig, 1889, Acad. Nat. Sci. 
Proc. , 187, because it is a var. of willemite resembling tephroite. A 
yar. of troostite of a dark-brown color. 

TBRATOUTB. E. F. Gloeker, 1889, Glock. Min., 544 (Teratolith), 
f. ripa^, -aroS, 'the wonder,* in allusion to its early name Terra mirac- 
lofla, and AtOoS. A clay-like mineral closely allied to pholerite. 

TERBNTTB. E. Emmons, 1837, Geol. Surv. N. Y., 152, f. r^pffv, 
"tender,' because very brittle. An altered scapolite, of greenish or 
yellowish color, near algerite. 

TERMANITE. Error for tannenite. 

TESOHEMAOHBRTTB. /. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 705, after 
E. F. Teschemacher, who first described it. Acid carbonate of am- 
monium, found in yellowish crystals in guano. 

TESSEUTE. D. Brewster, 1819, Ed. Phil. Jour., i, 5, f . its tesselated 
structure, seen in polarized light. A cubical var. of apophyllite. 

TETAUTE. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 23, f. Tetala, Mexico, 

its locality. A var. of calcite near spartaite, containing about nine per 
cent of carbonate of manganese. 

TETARTINB. A. Breithaupt, 1828, Breit. Char., 275 (Tetartin), f. 
T^raproi, * a quarter,' because it shows tetartohedral planes. An obs. 
syn. of albite. 

TETRAOLASITB. J. F. L, ffausmann, 1813, Haus. Min., ii, 511 
<Tetraklasit), f. rerpa-, *four,' and kXccv, 'to break,' because it has four 
•cleavages. An obs. syn. of meionite. 

TETRADTMITB. W. Haidinger, [1831, Zt. Phys., ix. 129], 1833f 
Glock. Jahres. for 1831, 82 (Tetrndymit), f. rerpadvMoi, * four at a birth,' 
alluding to the twinning habit of its crystals. Telluride of bismuth, 
found in splendent, steel-gray laminae. 

Wehrlite has also been includedunder this name. 

TBTRAHBDRTTB. W, Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 563 (Tetra- 
edrit), f . the tetrahedral form of its crystals. Sulphide of antimony and 
copper, with other elements often replacing one or more of these. 



269 

TBTRAPHTLXNB. /. /. Berzeliw, 1886, Berz. Jabres., xv, 212 
(Tetrapbyliu), f. rerpd', 'four,* and <pvXif, *a tribe.' An obs. syn of 
tripbylite, tbe name given wben a fourtb base was discovered in it. 

TEXAIilTB. R Hermann, 1861, Jour. Pk. Cb., Ixxxii, 868 (Texa- 
litb), f. Texas, Pa., its locality, and AzBoS. An obs. syn. of briicite. 

TEXA8ITE. A. Kenngoti, 1858, Eenng. Min., 18 (Texasit), f. Texas, 
Pa., its locality. An obs. syn. of zaratite. 

THALAOKBRTTB. A. Breiihaupt, 1867, lust. Fr. Mem., xviii, 542 
(no derivation given). A var. of anthopliyllite from Greenland. 

THALHBIMITB. A, BreW^aupi, 1866, Berg. HUt., xxv. 167 (Tbal- 
heimit), f. Thalbeim, Saxony, its locality. An obs. syn. of arsenopyrite. 

THAUTE. D. D. Owen, 1852, Acad. Nut. Sci. Jour., ii, 182, prob- 
ably f. BaXeia, 'blooming,' because of its light green color. An obs. 
syn. of saponite. 

THAT.LITB. /. C. Delameiherie, 1792, Delam. Sciag., ii, 401, f. 
BaXXoS, * a young shoot,' alluding to its green color. An obs. syn. of 
epidote. 

THARANDITE. J, K. FreiesUben, [1*817, Geognotische Arbeiten, v, 
212], 1821. Leon. Oiykt., 580 (Tharandit). f. Tbaraud. Saxony, iu locality. 
A var. of dolomite, containing a little carbonate of iron. 

THAUMASTTE. A, E. Nordenskidld, 1878. C. R.. Ixxxvii, 818 
(Thaumasit), f. Bcxv/td^eiy, 'to be surprised.* on account of its unusual 
composition. A white, amorphous mineral composed of silicate, carbon- 
ate and sulphate of calcium, and water. 

THBNARDITE. /. L. Casaseea, 1826, Ann. Ch. Phys.. xxxii. 808, 
in honor of Prof. L. J. Thenard. Anhydrous sodium sulphate, found in 
white or brownish crystals. 

THBRMONATRmi. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 487 
<Thermonatrit). f. Bep/Lio?, 'heat,' and natron, because it results from the 
drying out of natron. Native sodium carbonate found as an efflorescence 
on the soil. 

THERMONITRITE. Variant of thermonatrite. 

THERMOPHTLUTE. A. E. Nordenskidld, 1855. Nord. Fin. Min., 
160 (Thermophyllit). f. Oep/iJ^, 'heat.' and <puXXov, *a leaf, because it 
exfoliates when heated. A var. of serpentine, occurring in aggregates 
made up of small crystalline scales. 

THETIS' HAIR-STONE. An old name for rock crystal containing 
acicular crystals of actinolite. 

THIERSOHTTE. /. v. Liebig, 1858, Ann. Ch. Pharm., Ixxxvi. 113 
(Thierschit). after F. v. Thiersch, who discovered it. Oxalate of lime 
found as a thin incrustation on marble. 



THINOLITB 270 THULITII 

THINOLITE. Clarence King, 1879, Geol. of the 40th Parallel, i, 
508, f. Ot'?, Bivos, *a shore,' because found as a shore deposit, and XiQoi, 
A var. of calcite, occurring in pseudomorphous crystals, the original min> 
cral being still in doubt. 

THIORSANTTE. Error for thiorsauite. 

THIORSAUrrX!. F. A. Oenth, 1848, Ann. Ch. Pharm., Ixvi, 18 
(Thjorsauit), f. Thjorsau, Iceland, its locality. An obs. syn. of anor- 
thite. 

THIOSAURTTE. Error for thiorsauite. 

THOMAITB. V. Meyer, 1845, Jahrb. Min., 200 (Thomait), in 

honor of Prof. C. Thomtt. An obs. syn. of siderite. 

THOMSENOUTB. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 129, after Dr. 
J. Thomsen, who first noticed it, and At9o5. Hydrous fluoride of alum- 
inum, calcium and sodium, found in small ciystals on cryolite. 

TH0M80NITB. H. J. Brooke, 1820. Ann. Phil., xvi, 193, in honor 
of Dr. Thos. Thomson. Hydrous silicate of aluminum, calcium and 
sodium, found often in white, radiated masses. 

Also used by P. Squires, 1821, Ann. Phil., 2d, ii, 254, for an uncertain 
siliceous carbonate of calcium and magnesium. 

THORITE. J. J. BerzeliuB, 1829, Vet. Ak. Stock., 3 (Thorit), f. \\& 
composition. Silicate of thorium, found in brownish-black or orange- 
yellow crystals with a resinous lustre. 

THOROaUMMITE. W. E, Hidden and J, B, MacJdnlmh, 1889, A. 
J. S., 8d, xxxviii, 480, 'because it is a gummite, in which the water has 
been replaced by the thorite molecule.' A decomposition product of 

cleveite. 

THORURANINTTE. C, W. BUmstrand, 1884, Geol. F5r. F6rh.^ 
vii, 89 (Thorui-anin), f. its composition. A syn. of brOggerite. 

THRAULITE. F, v. Kobell, 1828, Pogg. Ann., xiv, 467 (Thraulit), 
f. BpavXo<i, * brittle,' a characteristic property. A syn. of gillingite. 

THROMBOLITE. A. BreiViaupt, 1838, Jour. Pk. Ch., xv, 321 
(Thrombolith), f. ©poyu^o?, * a curd,' in allusion to its appearance, and 
XiBoi, An uncertain copper mineral, found in amorphous masses, prob- 
ably a mixture. 

THUBNITB. 1892, Dana Min., 1131 (Index), f. the Thuensky Mts., 
Urals. A var. of ilmenite. 

THULITE. A. G. Ekeberg, 1820, Jam. Min., i, 134, f. Thule, an 
ancient name for the most northern region of Europe, because it came 
from Norway. According to H. J. Brooke, 1836, Phil. Mag., 3d, viii, 
169, this name was first noticed on a label in the handwriting of A. G» 
Ekeberg. A rose-red var. of zoisite. ■ 



THUBSBRSTONB 271 TTTANIOFERRITE 

THUMERSTONB. A, G. Werner, 1788, Berg. Jour., i, 54 (Thum- 
ersteiu), f. Thum, Saxony, its locality. An obs. syD. of axiuite. 

THUMITE. Variant of tbumerstone. 

THUBSMER8TONE. Error for tbumerstone. 

THUNDITE. 8. Meunier, 1898, Mcun. Fers Met., 61, f. Tbunda, 
Australiii, where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 

THURINaiTB. A, BreithaupU 1832, Breit. Cbar., 95 (Tburingit), 
f. Thuriugia, where it was found. Hydrous silicate of aluminum and 
iron, found in aggregations of minute, dark green scales. 

TIEMANNITE. C, F. Naumann, 1855, Naum. Min., 425 (Tie- 
mannit), after W. Tiemann, who discovered it. Selenide of mercury, 
having a gray color and metallic lustre. 

TIOER-ETE. A popular name for a siliceous pseudomorph after 
crocidolitc, in allusion to its yellow-brown color and chatoyant lustre. 

TIGER'S ETE. Same as tiger-eye. 

TILE-ORE. a A, 8. Hoffmann, 1789, Berg. Jour., ii, 2044 (Zieg- 
elerz), in allusion to its color. A massive var. of cuprite, of brick-red 
color. 

TILKERODITE. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb.. 566 (Tilkero- 
dit), f. Tilkerode, Harz Mts., its locality. A cobaltiferous var. of claus- 
thalite. 

TIN. Native tin, of doubtful occurrence though often reported. 

TINOAIi. The Oriental name of borax. 

TINOALOONITE. 0, U. Shepard, 1878, Bull. Soc. Mhi., i, 144, f. 
tincal, and Koria, * powder.' A pulverulent var. of borax, with thirty- 
two per cent of water. 

TINOAIiZTTB. W. KUtsnmky, 1859, Chemisches Centralbhitt. iv, 
870 (Tincalzit), f. tincal and rhodozite, because it has both these minerals 
in its composition. An obs. syn. of ulexite. 

TINDER-ORE. An early name for an impure var. of Jamesonite, 
resembling tinder. 

TIN-ORE. An early popular name for cassiterite. 

TIN-PTRITE8. A, Q. Werner, 1789, Berg. Jour., i, 885 (Zinkies). 
A syn. of stannite. 

TIN-SPAR. Syn. of tin ore, 

TINSTONE. Syn. of cassiterite. 

TIN-WHTTB OOBAIiT. A syn. of smaltite. 

TITANIC IRON. A popular name for ilmenite, alluding to its com- 
position. 

TITANIOFERRrrE. E. J, Chapman, 1848. Chap. Min., 88, f. its 
oomposition. An obs. syn. of ilmenite. 



TITANITE 272 TORRBLITB 

TTTANITB. Jf. H. Klaproih, 1795, Klap. Beit., 1, 251 (Titianit), f. 
its compositioD. Titano-silicate of calcium, called also sphene. 

Also used hy R, Kirwan, 1796, Kirw. Min., ii, 329. An obs. syn. 
of rutile. 

TITANOLIVINE. A. Damour, 1879, Bull. Soc. Min., ii. 16, f. its 
composition. A var. of olivine (chrysolite) containing titanic acid. 

TITANOMORPHITE. A. v. Lasaulx, [1877, Jahresb. Schles. Ges., 
45], 1879, Jahrb. Min., 568 (Titanomorphit), f. titanium, and /io/o^ouK, *to 
form,' because a decomposition product of titanium minerals. An un- 
certain alteration product, near titanite. 

TOADSETE TIN. A popular name for a var. of cassiterite, so 
called from its appearance. 

TOBERMORTTE. M, F. HeddU, 1880. Min. Mag., iv, 119, f. Tober- 
more, Isle of Mull, where it was found. A hydrous silicate of calcium, 
near gyrolite. 

TOOORNAUTE. /. Domeyko, 1867, Min. Chili, App. 2, 41, in 
honor of A. Tocornal. Iodide of silver and mercury, found in yellow, 
granular masses. 

TOMBAZITE. A. BreOhaupt, 1838, Jour. Pk. Ch., xv. 880 (Tom- 
bazit), alluding to its tombac color. An obs. syn. of gersdorffite. Part 
of the original tombazite is pyrite. 

TOMOSITE. B. F. Oloeker, 1881, Glock. Min., 649 (no derivation 
given). An obs. syn. of photicite. 

TOPAZ. From roTta^iov, but not now used for the mineral known 
to the ancients by this name. Fluo-sUicate of aluminum in various 
colors, and used as a gem. 

TOPAZOUTE. B. Bonwnsm, 1806. Jour, de Phys., Ixii. 409. f. 
topaz, alluding to its color, and Xt^oi. A var. of garnet resembling topaz 
in color. 

TORBANTTE. B. P. Greg and W. O. Lettsom, 1858. G. and L. Min., 
16, f. Torbane Hill, Scotland, its locality. A hydrocarbon resembling 
cannel coal, but having a uniform composition. 

TORBERTTE. Variant of torbemite. 

TORBERNTTE. A. Q. Werner, 1798, Karst. Wem.. 48 (Torberit), 
after Torbern Bergmann, who first examined it. Hydrous phosphate of 
uranium and copper, found in green, tabular crystals. 

TORRELITE. T. T/iomson, 1836. Rec. Gen. Sci.. iv, 408, after 
Dr. J. Torrey. from whom it was received, and Xi^o^, An obs. syn. of 
columbite. 

Also used earlier by J. Bentnck, 1824 (read 1828). Ann. Lye. N. Y., 
i, 42, in honor of Dr. J. Torrey, President of the society. A supposed 



TOTAIOITB 278 TRIOHTTB 

silictite of cerium and other bases, but later proved to be simply dark 
red jasper. 

TOTAIOrm. M, F, Heddle, 1878, Roy. Soc. £d., xxviii, 458. f. 
Totaig, Scotland, its locality. A decomposition product of pyroxene, 
allied to serpentine. 

TOUCHSTONE. A name derived from its use by Jewelers. A 
syn. of basanite. 

TOURMAUNB. Said to be a corniption of the CiDgalese word 
tournamal. A complex silicoborate of various colors, v^hich is often 
used as a gem. 

TOURMALTWITB. Variant of tourmaline. 

TOWANTTE. K J, Brooke and W. H. MUUr. 1852, B. end M. Min., 
182, f. Huel Towan, Coruv^all, its locality. An obs. syn. of chal- 
copyrite. 

TRAOHTLITB. Error for tacbylite. 

TRANBVAALITB. T, B. MaeOhie and John Clark, 1890, £. M. 
Jour. , 1, 96, f. the Transvaal , S. Af . , its locality. Impure oxide of cobalt, 
resulting from the alteration of cobalt arsenide. 

TRAUTWINITU. E. Goldsmith, 1878, Acad. Nat. Sci. Proc., 9, 
after J. C. Trautwiue, from whom it was received. An impure var. of 
uvarovite. 

TRAVERSELLTTE. I7i. Seheerer, 1854. Pogg. Ann., xciii, 109 
(Traversellit), f. Traversella, Piedmont, its locality. A var. of diopside, 
in ciystals, which are often green at one end and colorless at the other. 

TRAVERTINE. Probably a corruption of Lapis Tiburtinus, ' the 
stone of Tibur.' A var. of calcite formed as a deposit from springs or 
rivers, and so hard and compact as to be fit for use as a building stone. 

TRAVEBTINE. Error for travertine. 

TREMENHEERTTE. H. PiddingUm, 1847, Soc. Beng. Jour., xvi 
(1), 869, after Capt. G. B. Tremenheere, from whom it was received. An 
impure graphite. 

TREMOLITE. E, Pini, 1796, Saus. Alp., vii, § 1923, f. Tremola, 
Switzerland, its locality. A white or gray var. of amphibole, either 
fibrous or in thin-bladed crystals. 

Used by /. O. A. Hoapfner, 1790, Berg. Jour., i, 82 (Tremolit), for a 
siliceous mineral, not now identified. 

TRIOHAIiOITE. R. Hermann, 1858, Jour. Pk. Ch.. IxxUi, 212 
(Trichalcit). f. rpi^, 'three,' and x<^^^^^* 'copper,' because it contains 
three molecules of copper oxide to one of arsenic acid. Arsenate of cop- 
per, found in radiated groups having a silky lustre. 

TRIOHTTE. F. Zirkel, 1867. Zt. Geol., xix, 744 (Trichit), f. Bpi^, 



> 



TRIOHOPTRITX! 274 TRIPLOIDITG 

Tftixo^f ' a bair/ alluding to its shape. A uame applied to microscopic 
capillary substances, found in rocks, and of unknown composition. 

TRIOHOPTRITX!. K FMlocker, lSil,Qlock, 8yu.,43(Trichopyrit), 
f. Bfji^, Tfjixoi, *a hair/ and pyrite. An obs. syn. of hair pyrites 
(raillerite). 

TRIOLASrrXI. J, F. L. Hausmann, 1808, Moll. Jahrb. Efem., iv, 
396 (Triclasit), f. rpt'S, 'three,' and kXccv, *to break,' from its threefold 
cleavage. An obs. syn. of fahl unite. 

TRIDTMITE. O. vom Hath, 1868, Pogg. Ann., cxxxv, 437 (Tridy- 
mit), f. rpiSv/ioi, * triplet,* because often found in trillings. A form of 
silica occurring in small, hexagonal tables. 

TRIMERTTE. O, mink, 1890, Zt. Kryst., xviii, 861 (Trimerit), f. 
rpmep^i, * threefold,' alluding to its optical structure. Silicate of 
glucinum, manganese and calcium, found in brilliant, pinkish crystals. 

TRINAORITB. W. 8. v. Waltersliausen, 1853, Walt. Vul., 237 
(Trinacrit), f. Trinacria, the ancient name of Sicily, where it was found. 
One of the varieties of palagonite, now considered as a rock. 

TRINEERITE. O. Tschermak, 1870, Jour. Pk. Ch., ii, 268 (Trink- 
erit). after J. Trinker, from whom it was received. An oxygenated 
hydrocarbon, containing sulphur. 

TRIPESTONB. A var. of anhydrite, occurring in contorted forms, 
having a fancied resemblance to tripe. 

TRITHANE. B. J. Hauy, 1801, Hatty Min., iv, 289, f. rftt<pdvi}i, 
'appearing threefold.' because it was thought to have the same lustre 
from three points of view, in this respect differing from similar minerals. 
A syn. of spodumene. 

TRIPHANTTE. A, Dufrenoy, 1847, Duf. Min., iii, 786 (no deriva- 
tion suggested). An obscure, rose- or flesh-red fibrous mineral, near 
cluthalite. 

TRIPHTLINE. See triphylite. 

TRIPHYUTE. J. N. Fuchs, 1834, Jour. Pk. Ch., iii, 98 (Triphylin), 
f. Tpii, 'three,' and 0vXi^, 'a tribe,' because it contains three bases. 
Phosphate of iron, magnesium and lithium, found usually in cleavable 
masses. 

TRIPLITE. /. F, L. Hausmann, 1813, Haus. Min., iii, 1079 (Trip- 
lit), f. rfjiTtXooi, 'threefold,' probably in allusion to its three cleavages. 
Fluophosphate of iron and manganese. 

TRIPLOOIiASE. A. Breithaupt, 1832, Breit. Char., 121 (Triplo- 
klas), probably f. rpiitXoo^, 'threefold,' and KXav, *to break/ alluding 
to its three cleavages. An obs. syn. of thomsonite. 

TRIPLOmiTE. Q, J. Brush and E. 8 Dana, 1878, A. J. 8., 8d, 



TRIPOLI 275 TSOHBRMIOITE 

XV, 398, f. triplite, and eldo?, 'form.' from its resemblance to triplite. 
Hydrous phosphate of iron and manganese. 

TRIPOLI. Variant of tripolite. 

TRIPOLTTB. J. Q. WalUrivs, 1747, Wall. Min., 82 (Trippel), f. 
Trippela (Tripoli), its locality. The siliceous shells of diatoms, found 
in extensive deposits. 

TRIPPKBITB. A, Damour and G. vom Eath, 1880. Zt. Kryst.. v, 
245 (Trippkeit), in honor of Dr. P. Trippke. Ai-senite of copper, 
occurring in small crystals of a bluish-green color. 

TRITOOHORITE. A. Fremel, 18il, Min. Mitlh., iii, 506 (Trito- 
chorit), f. TfjiTo^t *a third,* and ;f(»p6iK, * to come on,* because considered 
a third vanadate, eusynchite and aiiloxene being the other two. A syn. 
of descloizite. 

TRTTOMITE. P. C, Weibye and N, J. BerHn, 1850, Pogg. Ann., 
Ixxix, 299 (Tritomit), f. rpi'S, 'three,* and refiyeiv, *to cut,' because the 
crystals leave trihedral cavities in the gangue. Fluo-silicate of thorium, 
cerium and other bases. 

TROOBRTTB. A, Weisbach, 1871, Jahrb. Min., 870 (TrOgerit), in 
honor of Mining Administrator R. TrOger. Hydrous arsenate of ura- 
nium, found in thin, yellow crystals. 

TROILTTB. W. Hnidinger, 1863, K. Ak. Wien, xlvii, (2), 283 
(Troilit), after D. Troili. who described a meteorite containing this 
species in 1766. Ferrous sulphide, a common constituent of iron 
meteorites. 

TROLLBITB. C, W, BUmstrand, 1868, Dana Min., 577, in honor 
of H. G. Trolle-Wachtmeister. Hydrous phosphate of aluminum, found 
in pale green, compact masses. 

TROMBOLTTE. Variant of thrombolite. 

TRONA. C%. Bagge, 1773, Vet. Ak. Stock., xxxiv, 140, said to be 
the Arabic name of the native salt. Hydrous sodium carbonaH; de- 
posited from water, found in fibrous masses and as an incrustation. 

TROOSITB. C. U. Sfiepard, 1832. Sbep. Min., 154, in honor of 
Prof. Q. Troost. A var. of willemite, found often in large crystals. 

TSOHBFFKINITB. O. Ro$e, 1842. Rose Reis., ii, 513 (Tschew- 
kinit), in honor of Qen, Tschevkin. Titanosilicate of the cerium metals 
and other bases, found in velvet-black masses. 

TSOHBRBSAKITB F v. Kobell 1878, Jour. Pk. Ch.. viii, 411 
(Tschermakit), in honor of Prof. 6. Tschermak. A syn. of albiie. 

TSOHBRMIOITB. F, v. Kobell, 1853, Eob. Taf.. 44 (Tschermigit), 
f. Tschermig, Bohemia, its locality. Sulphate of aluminum and ammo- 
nium, native ammonium alum. 



TUOZONTTE 276 TTSONTTB 

TUCZONITE. 8. Meunier, 1898, Meun. Fers Met., 86, f. Tuczoq 
(Tucson). Arizoua. where it was found. A var. of meteoric iron. 

TUESITE. r. Thomson, 1836, Thom. Min., i, 244, f. Tuesa, the 
ancient nume of the Tweed, on whose banks it was found. A lithomarge 
classed under kaoliuite. 

TUNaSTBN. K, W. Scheele, 1781, Vet. Ak. Stock., ii, 89, f. tung, 
'heavy/ and sten, 'stone,' in allusion to its high specific gravity. An 
obs. syn. of scheelite. 

TUNQSTIO OOHRE. B. SUliman, 1822, A. J. S., iv, 52. f. its 
comDosition. A syn. of tungstite. 

TUNaSTTTB. /. D, Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 186, f. its composition. 
Tungstic acid, found as a yellow, earthy powder. 

Also used by J. C. Delametherie, 1795, Delam. T. T., iii, 460 (Tunstite)- 
An obs. syn. of scheelite. 

TUNSTITB. See tungstite. 

TUROITE. R, Hermann^ 1845, Soc. Nat. Mosc. Bull., i, 252, f. the 
Turginsk mine, Urnl Mts., its locality. Hydrous sesquioxide of iron, 
diftering from limouite in containing less water. 

TURKBT-FAT ORB. A local name for a var. of 8mithsonite» 
colored yellow by greenockite, so called from its appearance. 

TURMAIilN. Variant of tourmaline. 

TURNBRTTB. A, Lety, 1828, Ann. Phil., v, 241, after C. H. 
Turner, in whose collection it was found. A yar. of monazite, long^ 
considered a distinct mineral. 

TURQUOISB. Probably so called because originally brought from 
Turkey. Hydrous silicate of aluminum, of a blue or greenish-blue 
color, used as a gem. 

TYRBBITE. M, F, Heddle, 1881. Min. Mag., iv, 189, f. T>Tee, 
Scotland, its locality. The name provisionally given to a red mud» 
found in the residue from the solution of a large quantity of red marble. 

TIRITB. D. Forbes and T. Dahll, 1855, Mag. Nat., viii, 218, f. 
Tyr, ft Scandinavian deity. A syn. of fergusouite. 

TTROIilTB. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 509 (Tirolit), f. the 
Tyrol, where it was found. Hydrauft arsenate of copper, found usually 
in reniform masses of pale green color. 

Also used by J. C. Delameiherie, 1812, Delam. Min., ii, 88. An 
obs. syn. of lazulite. 

TYSONITB. 0. D. Allen und W. J, Comstoek, 1880. A. J. &., 3d, 
xix, 890, after S. T. Tyson, from whom it was received. Fluoride of 
the cerium metals, in crystals the outside of which are often alteied to 
bastnasite. 



UDDBVALLITB 277 URANBLOOM 

UDDBVAIXTTB. J. D. Dana, 1868. Dana Min., 144, f. Uddevalla, 
Sweden, its locality. A var. of menaccauite, conlaiuing about ten percent 
of titanium. 

UIOITE. M, F, ffeddU, 1856, Ed. New Phil. Jour , 2d, iv, 162, f. 
Uig, Isle of Skye, its locality. An uncertain hydrous silicate of alumi* 
num and calcium, near prehnite. 

niNTAHTTE. TT. P. Blake, 1885, E. M. Jour., xl, 431, f. the Uin- 
tab Mts., Utah, where it was found. A black, lustrous hydrocarbon, 
near asphaltum, popularly called gilsonite. 

XJINTAITXI. Variant of uintahite. 
• ULEXITB. J, D. Dana, 1850, Dana Min., 695, after G. L. Ulex, 
who discovered it. Hydroua borate of calcium and sodium, usually 
found in rounded masses with fibrous structure. 

nUJOANNITB. /. Frvbel, 1850, Daoa Min., 478 (Ullmannit), after 
Prof. J. C. Ullmann, who discovered it. Sulph-antimouide of nickel, 
found in gray, metallic crystals, and massive. 

ULTR AM ARTWB. A syn. of lapis lazuli, from which the pig- 
ment was first made, so called because it came from Asia, ' beyond the 
sea.' 

UBIANOITB. F, Kloekmann, 1891, Zt. Eryst., zlx, 269 (Umangit), 
f. Sierra de Umango, Argentine Republic, its locality. Selenlde of cop- 
per, found in dark red, granular masses. 

UNOHWARITB. E. F. Glocker, 1889, Glock. Min., 587 (Ungh- 
warit). f. Unghwar, Hungary, its locality. A syn. of chloropal. 

UNIONITXI. R SiUiman, Jr., 1849, A. J. S., 2d, yiii, 884. f. Union- 
▼ille, Pa., its locality. A syn. of zoisite. 

URAOONISE. See uraconite. 

URAOONITB. F. 8, Bmdanl, 1882. Beud. Min., ii, 672 (Uracooise), 
f. urane, 'uranium,' and Koria, * powder,' alluding to its composition and 
mode of occurrenoe. Sulphate of uranium, found as a lemon-yellow 
powder. 

URALW^. Q, BmS, 1881, Pogg. Ann., xxii, 821 (Uralit), f. the 
Ural Mts., where It was found. Pyroxene altered to amphibole, having 
the form of pyroxene, but the cleavage of amphibole. 

URALORTHXTE. R, Hermann, 1841. Jour. Pk. Ch., xxiii, 278 
(Ural-Orthit), f. the Ural Mts., where found, and orthite. A var. of 
orthite, found in large, prismatic crystals. 

URANATBMNITXI. E. /. aiapman, 1848, Chap. Min., 104, f. 
uranium and dreurety, 'not to cut,' because a uranium mineral without 
cleavage. An obs. syn. of uraninite. 

URANBLOOM. F X. M. Zippe, [1824, Ges. BOhm. Museums Yerh.. 



URANOR£EN 278 URANOSPELSSRITB 

2d, pt], 1826, Leon. Orykt., 786 (UranblQthe), f. its composition. An 
obs. syu. of zippeite. 

URANQREBN. K. F, A, Hartmann, 1845. Haid Handb , 510 
(Urangrilu), f. its compositiou and color. An obs. syn. of uruuoclialcite. 

URANIN. See urauinite. 

URANINITE. W. Haidiriger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 549 (Urauin), f. 
its composition. Uranate of uranyl. containing also lead, usually 
with thorium and other bases. 

URANTTE. A. Aikin, 1814, Aik. Miu., 69, f. its composition. An 
obs. syn. of autunite, including torbernite, which had not been separated 
tX that time. 

Used also by M, H. Klaproth, 1789, Berg. Jour., ii, 928 (Uranit). 
The earliest name of the metal uranium. 

URANMIOA. A. O. Werner, 1800, Karst. Tab , 56 (Uran glimmer), 
f. its composition and structure. An obs. syn. of torbernite, which then 
included autunite. 

URANOOHALOITE. A. Breiihaupt, 1841, Breit. Handb., ii, 178 
(Urauochalzit), f. its composition. One of the imcertain decomposition 
products of uraniuite. 

URANOOHRE. if. K Klaproth, 1790, Berg. Jour., ii, 255 (Uran- 
ocker), f . its composition. A syn. of uraconite. 

URANOOIROITB. A. Weisbach, 1877, Jahrb. Berg. HQt., 48 
(Uranocircit), f. Uran, ' uranium,' and KipKoS, 'a falcon,' because it is a 
uranium mineral from Falkenstein. Hydrous phosphate of uranium and 
barium, similar in appearance to autunite. 

URANONIOBITE. ff. Rose, 1847, Pogg. Ann.. Ixxi, 157 (Urano- 
niobit), f . its composition. An obs. syn. of samarskitc. 

Used also by B, Hermann, 1859, Jour. Pk. Ch., Ixxyi, 826. A syn. 
of uraninite, used only for the crystallized variety. 

URANOFHANE. M. Websky, 1853. Zt. Geol., v, 427 (Uranophan), 
f. Uran, 'uranium,* alluding to its composition, and <f>aive<TBai, *to 
appear.' Hydrous silicate of uranium and calcium, found in yellow, 
fibrous masses. 

URANOFHTLLITE. See uranphyllite. 

URANOFILITE. A. WeiabacK 1882, Jahrb. Min., ii, 259 (Urano> 
pilit). f. Uran, * uranium,' and niXoi, • felt, 'alluding to }ls composition and 
structure. Hydrous sulphate of uranium, found as a velvety incrusta- 
tiou. 

URANOSFH2!RITE. A. Weisbach, 1873, Jahrb. Min., 315 (Urauo- 
sphftrit), f . its composition and structure. Hydrous uranate of bismuth, 
found in semi-globular forms, of a red color. 



X7RANOSPINITE 279 VAALITE 

nRANOSPINITB. A, WekbacK 1873, Jahrb. Min., 815 (Urano- 
spinit), f. Uran, ' uranium/ and a-nivoi, 'siskin/ alluding to its com- 
position and color. Hydrous arsenate of uranium and calcium, found 
in green, tabular crystals. 

URANOTANTAIimi. K Bose, 1839, Pogg. Ann., xlviii, 555 
(Uranotantal). f. its composition. An obs. syn. of samarskite. 

URANOTHALLITXI. A. Schrauf, 1882, Zt. Kryst., vi, 410 (Uran- 
othallit), f. Uran, 'uranium,' and BaWuS, 'a green shoot/ alluding to its 
composition and color. Hydrous carbonate of uranium and calcium, of 
a siskin- green color. 

URANOTHORITE. P. Collier, 1880, Am. Ch. Soc, ii, 73, f. its 
composition. A var. of thorite, containing considerable uranium. 

URANOTIL. E. Baricky, 1870. B5h. Ges. Ber.. x, (1), 35, f. Uran, 
' uranium,' and r/AoS, 'a fibre,' alluding to its composition and structure. 
A syn. of uranophane. 

URANPHTLUTZI. A. Breithaupt, 1820, Breit. Char., 6 ( Uran phy Hit), 
f. Uran, ' uranium,' and 0v\Xoy, ' a leaf,' alluding to its composition and 
structure. An obs. syn. of torbernite. 

URANVITRIOL. /. F, John, 1822, [John Unt., v, 254], Tasch. Min., 
xvi, 693 (Uran- Vitriol), f. its composition. An obs. syn. of johannite. 

URBANITE. n. f^ogren, 1892. Geol. FOr. F5rh., xiv, 253 (Urbanit), 
in honor of Urban HjSrne. A var. of pyroxene, the so-called iron- 
schefferite of Q, Flink, 1886. Zt. Kryst., xi, 501. 

URDITE. D. Forbes and T. Dahll, 1855, Mag. Nat., viii, 226 (Urdit), 
f. Urda, Norway, its locality. A syn. of monazite. 

URISITE. Error for urusite. 

URPETHITE. /. D, Dana, 1868. Dana Min., 731. f. Urpeth 
colliery, near Newcastle-on-Tyne, its locality. A soft, waxy hydrocar- 
bon, separated from ozocerite by ether. 

URUSITE. A, Fremel, 1879, Min. Mitth.. ii, 183 (Urusit). f. Urus, 
Tscheleken Isl., Caspian Sea, its locality. A syn. of sideronatrite. 

URVOLOYITB. /. 8sujtb6, 1879. Min. Mitth.. ii, 311 (Urv($lgyit), f. 
UrvOlgy (Herrengrund), Hungary, its locality. A syn. of heri-engrundite. 

UTAHmi. A. Arzruni, 1884, Zt. Kryst., ix, 558 (Utahit), because 
found in Utah. Hydrous sulphate of iron, found in orange-yellow 
crystals on quartz. 

UVAROVTTB. O. H. HeM, 1832, Pogg. Ann., xxiv, 388 (Uvarowit). 
in honor of Count S. 8. Uvarov, President of the Academy of St. Pe- 
tersburg. An emerald green var. of garnet, colored by chromium. 

VAAIilTB. N. 8, Maskelyne and W. Flight, 1874. Geol. Soc. Lond., 
XXX, 409, f. the Yaal River, S. Af., near which it was found. Hydrous 



VALATTB 280 VARVAOITB 

silicate of alumiuum, iron and magnesium, found in bluish, hexagonal 
prisms. 

VALArrB. W. Helmhaeker, 1867, Geol. Reich. Jahrb., xvii, 210 

(Valait), in honor of Vala, a personal friend. A pitch-black resin 

of unknown composition. 

VALENOIANTTB. A. Breithaupt, 1830, Jour. Ch. Ph., Ix, 822 
(Valencianit), f. Valenciana, Mex., its locality. A sjrn. of adularia. 

VAUEINTIANITE. J. Mavoe, 1818, Ma we Cat., 62, after Lord 
Valentia, who brought it from the Red Sea. Described as native 
magnesia, but not now identified. 

VALENTINITB. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 506, after 
Basil Valentine, who discovered the properties of antimony. Antimony 
trioxide, found in crystals of various colors and adamantine lustre. 

VALLERIITE. C. W. Blomstrand, 1870, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv.. 
xxvii, 19 (Valleriit), in honor of J. G. Wallerius (Vallerius). Sulphide of 
copper and iron, containing aluminum and magnesium, doubtless a mixture. 

VALUEVITE. Variant of waluewite. 

VANADIO OCHRE. J. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 167, f. its 
composition. Vanudic acid, found as a yellowish incrustation on copper. 

VANADIN-aUMMITE. R. Hermann, 1859, Jour. Pk. Ch., Ixxvi, 
327 (Vauadin-Gummit). A var. of gummite, containing vanadium. 

VANADINTTE. F, v. Kohell, 1838, Kob. Min., 283 (Vanadinit), f. 
its composition. Chloro-vanadate of lead, found in brilliant, prismatic 
crystals of various colors. 

VANADIOLITE. R. Hermann, 1870, Jour. Pk. Ch., i, 445 (Vana- 
diolit), f. its composition, and Xiboi. A doubtful silicate containing 
vanadium, probably a mixture. 

VANADITE. F. X. M. Zippe, 1861. K. Ak. Wien, xliv, (1), 197, f. 
its composition. An obs. syn. of descloizite. 

VANDANTTE. Error for randanite. 

VANUXEMITE. G. U. Sliepard, 1876, Shep. Cont. Min., 1, in 
honor of Prof. L. Vanuxem. A clay containing zinc silicate, evidently a 
decomposition product. 

VARQASITE. /. J. N. Huoi, 1841. Huot Min., ii, 676, in honor of 
Count Vargas de Bedemar. A syn. of pyrallolite. 

VARIEQATED COPPER. An early name of bornite, alluding to 
its appearance. 

VARISCITE. A. Breithaupt, 1837, Jour. Pk. Ch., x, 506 (Variscit), 
f. Variscia, the ancient name of the Voigtland, where it was found. 
Hydrous phosphate of aluminum found in bright, green, crystalline crusts. 

VARVACITE. Error for varvicite. 



▼ARVIOITB 281 VESUVIAN 

VARVIOITB. R. PhOUpi, 1880, Phil. Mag,. 2d, vi. 282. f. Varvicia 
(Warwickshire), Eng., where it was found. An impure pjrolusite or 
wad, resulting from the alteration of manganite. 

VA8ITE. Variant of wasite. 

VAUQUELXNII. See vauquelinite. 

VAUQUBLINmi. J. J. Bmelius, 1818, Afh. i Fis. . vi, 246 (Vauque- 
liue). after L. N. Vauquelin, who first noticed it Chromate of lead and 
copper, found in amorphous masses or crystalline crusts of a green color. 

VELVZrr OOPPSR ore. D, L, O. KanUn, 1808. Karst. Tab., 
62 (Kupfersammeterz), f. its appearance. An obs. syn. of cyanotrichite. 

VBNASQUITB. A. Damaur, 1879. Bull. Soc. Min., ii. 167, f. 
Venasque, in the Pyrenees, its locality. A syn. of ottrelite. 

VBNERITXI. T. 8. Hunt, 1876, Am. Inst. M. E.. iy, 828, f. Venus, 
-eiis, the alchemistic name of copper, because it contains it. A clay-like 
substance of greenish color, probably a chlorite impregnated with copper. 

VENUS' HAIR STONE. An early name for rock-crystal pene- 
trated with acicular rutile, or sometimes with other acicular crystals. 

VERMIOUUTE. T. IL Webb, 1824, A. J. S., vii, 55. f. vermicu- 
lor, *to breed worms.' because when heated it exfoliates into worm- 
like threads. Hydrous silicate of aluminum, iron and magnesium, 
occurring in small, foliated scales. The name has been applied to several 
minerals which exfoliate when heated, and is now generally used as a 
group name. 

VERMONTTTE. A, BreiihaupU 1885, Jour. Pk. Ch., iv, 269 (Ver- 
montit). because found in Vermont. An obs. syn. of danaite. 

VERONA EARTH. Syn. of veronite. 

VERONTTE. A Leymerie, 1859, Ley. Min., ii, 238, f. Verona, Italy, 
its locality. An obs. syn. of celadouite. 

VERRUOITE. /. Apjohn, 1858, G. and L. Min., 448, f. verruca, 'a 
wart,' from its appearance. A doubtful zeolite, found in rounded glob- 
ules, presenting a warty appearance. 

VESBINE. A, Seacehi, 1879. Nap. Ac. Atti, viii, (10). 1 (Vesbina). f. 
Its composition. The material found in yellow crusts on lava which was 
supposed to contain a new element called vesbium. 

VESTAN. Q. Jenuch, 1878, Pogg. Ann., cv, 820. f. Vesta, follow- 
ing the example of Breithaupt. who had previously used two mythologicals 
names for minerals. A very doubtful occurrence of quartz in triclinic 
crystals. 

VESUVIAN. R, Kirwan, 1794, Kirw. Min., i, 285. An obs. syn. 
of leocite. 

See also yesarianite. 



VESUVIAN GARNET 282 VIRIDITB 

VBSUVIAN GARNET. Ad early oame for leucite, from Vesuvius^ 
its principal locality. 

VESUVIANTTE. A. O. Werner, 1795, Klap. Beit., 1, 84 (Vesuvian), 
f . Vesuvius, its locality. Silicate of alumiDura, lime and other bascs^ 
found in square, prismatic ciystals of various colors. 

VESUVIAN SALT. James Smiihson, 1813, Phil. Trans., 262, f, 
Vesuvius, its locality. An obs. syn. of apbthitalite. 

VESZELTITE. A. Schrauf, 1874, K. Ak. Wien Anz., 135 (Ves- 
zelyit), after A. Veszely, who discovered it. Hydrous phospho- arsenate 
of copper and zinc, found in greenish-blue crystalline crusts. 

VIANDITE. E. Goldsmith, 1883, Geol. Surv. U. 8. 12th Kept.. (2), 
407, f . viand, because it looks like meat. A var. of geyserite containing 
an unusually large quantity of water. 

VIOHLOVITE. See wichlowite. 

VIOTORITB. 8. Mevnier, 1870, K. Ak. Wien Ber., 1x1, (2), 2ft 
(Victorit). in honor of Victor Meunier. A syn. of enstatite. 

VIERZONTTE. H. W. Brtstow, 1861, Brist. Gloss., 398, f. Vierzon, 
France, its locality. A yellow clay similar to melinite. 

VIETINGHOFITE. v. Lomonossov, 1877, Acad St. Pet. Bull., 

xxiii, 463, in honor of de Vietinghof. A dull black, ferruginous 

var. of samarskite. 

VIGNTTE. a J, B. Karsien, 1828, Archiv Berg-Htltt., xvi. SO, 
(Vignit), f. Vignes, France, its locality. A mixture of magnetic iron 
with the carbonate and phosphate of iron. 

VILLARSITE. A, Dvfrenot/, 1842, C R , xiv, 697, in honor of D, 
Villars, a famous botanist. A greenish-black, hydrous silicate of mag- 
nesium, found massive and in rounded grains. 

VILNTTE. HoTodeki, 1862, Des CI. Min., i, 554, f. Vilna, Po- 
land, its locality. An obs. syn. of wollastonite. 

VIOIiAN. A. Breiihaupt, 1838, Jour. Pk. Ch., xv, 321, f. viola, 'vio- 
let,* in allusion to its color. A dark violet var. of pyroxene. 

VIOLET SCHORL. Bome de Elsie, 1783, De L. Cryst., ii, 35a 
(Schorl violet), f . its color. An obs. syn. of axinite. 

VIOLITE. L. Darwpshy, 1890, Jahrb. Min.. i, 62 (Violit), viola, 
'violet,' in allusion to its color. One of several names proposed as sub- 
stitutes for copiapite and coquimbite. 

VIRESOITE. /. C. Delametlierie, 1795, Delam. T. T., ii, 65, f. 
viridis, 'green,' from its color. An obs. syn. of green pyroxene. 
VIRESEITE. Error for virescite. 

VmiDITE. H, Vogelsang, 1872, Zt. Geol., xxiv, 529 (Viridit), f. 
viridis, ' green,' in allusion to its color. A name proposed for certain 



VIRISrrE 283 VOLTAITB 

greeD minerals found in rocks, probably including several chlorites and 
perbaps serpentine 

VIRISrra. Variant of virescite. 

VTTRBOUS COPPER. Q, Agricola, 1546, Agric, 473 (Kupfer- 
glasertz), f. its composition and appearance. A syn. of cbalcocite. 

VTTRBOUS SILVBR. /. G. Wallerius, 1747, Wall. Min., 308 
(Silfverglas), f. its composition and appearance. A syn. of argentite. 

VTTRIOI* OOHRB. J, J. Btnzelim, 1818, Afb. i Fis , v. 157 (Vit- 
riolocker), f. its composition and appearance. An obs. syn. of glockerite. 

VTTRIOIJTB. H. W. BrisUno, 1861, Brist. Gloss., 399, f. its com- 
position. An obs. syn. of pisauite. 

VIVIANITB. A. Q. Werner, 1817, Wern. Letz., 41 (Vivianit), after 
J. G Vivian, who found it. Hydrous phosphate of iron, usually of blue 
or bluish-green color. 

VOGBSITB. A. Weisbach, 1875. Weis. Syn., 13 (Vogesit), f. the 
Vogesen (Vosges) Mts., where it was found. A syn. of pyrope. 

VOGUANITB. /. D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min.. 668. after J. F. 
Vogl, who described it. Basic sulphate of uranium, found in green, 
earthy coatings. 

VOaUTB. W. Haidinger, 1853, Geol. Reich. Jahrb., iv, 228 
(Voglit), after J. F. Vogl, who discovered it. Hydrous carbonate 
of uranium, calcium and copper, found in green, crystalliiic aggrega- 
tions. 

VOIOTITB. RE. Schmid, 1856, Fogg. Ann., xcvii, 108 (Voigtit), 

in honor of Voigt, a Saxon Mining Supt. An alteration product of 

biotite, found in thin, green scales. 

VOLBORTHTTB. O, H. Hes8, 1887, Acad. St. Pet. Bull., iv, 22, 
after Dr. A. Volborth, who found it. Hydrous vanadate of copper, 
barium and calcium, found in small, yellowish-green crystals. 

VOLCANIC SCHORIi. See volcanitc. 

VOLCANTTB. /. 0. Delamethsrie, 1792. Delam. Sciag., ii, 401. 
An obs. syn. of pyroxene, which had been called volcanic schorl. 

Also used by Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 54, because found near 

volcanoes. A syn. of selensulphur. 

VOLGBRTTB. J. D. Dana, 1854, Dana Min., 142, after O. Volger, 
who discovered it. Hydrous antimonic acid, found as a white powder 
resulting from the alteration of stibnite. 

VOLENBRITB. R. Hermann, 1847, Jour. Pk. Ch., xl, 11 (V51ck- 

nerit), after Capt. VOlckner, from whom it was obtained. A syn. 

of hydrotalcite. 

VOLTAITB. A. Seaeehi, 1841 (read 1840), Scac. Min., 17 , in honor of 



VOLTZINB 284 WALIiERIAK 

Prof. A. Volta. Ferro-ferric sulphate, found in dark green or black 
crystals. 

VOLTZINB. See voltzite. 

VOLTZTTB. /. Faurnet, 1888, Ann. des M., iii, 619 (Voltzine), in 
honor of Inspector Qeneral of Mines P. L. Voltz. Oxysulphide of zinc, 
found in reddish globules. 

VORAULITII. J. C. Delametherie, 1806. Jour, de Phys., Ixii, 350. f. 
Vorau, Styria, its locality, and Xi^oS. An obs. syn. of lazulite. 

VORHAUSBRTTB. A. Kenngoii, 1859, Kenng. Ueb. for 1856-7, 71 
(Vorhauserit), in honor of J. Vorhauser. A syn. of retinalite. 

VOSGITB. A. Deleaae, 1854, Ann. Ch. Phys., 8d, xl, 271, f. the 
Yosges Mts., where it was found. An altered labradorite. containing 
some water. 

VRBOKITB. See bhreckite. 

VULPINITB. 0. F. Ludwig, 1804, Ludw. Min., ii, 170 (Vulpinit), 
1. Yulpino, Lombardy, its locality. A scaly, granular var. of anhy- 
drite. 

WAOEBNRODITB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab., 76, after Dr. 

H. W. F. Wackenroder, who analyzed it. A var. of wad, containing 
oxide of lead. 

WAD. The origin of this word is uncertain. An early name, at 
first including graphite as well as the eai-thy oxide of manganese which now 
bears the name. 

WADITB. Variant of wad. 

WARTHTTB. Error for wOrthite. 

WAGITB. 0. RadoKkoski, <1861, C. R., liii, 1071, in honor of Prof. 
Waga, of.Warsaw. A light-blue or greenish var. of calamine. 

WAGNBRTTB. /. N, FucTiB, 1821, Jour. Cb. Ph., xxxiii. 269 (Wag- 
nerit), in honor of F. M. von Wagner. Fluophosphate of magnesium 
and iron, found in yellow crystals. 

WALOHOWrrB. W, Hamnger, 1845, Haid. Ueb. for 1848, 99 
<Walcbowit), f. Walchow, Moravia, where it was found. A honey- 
yellow resin similar to amber. 

WALDHBIMITB. G. F, v. BammeUberg, 1860. Ramm. Min. Ch., 
780 (Waldbeimit), f. Waldheim, Saxony, its locality. An amphibole- 
like mineral containing much soda, probably the result of alteration. 

WAIiEERITB. M. F. ffeddU, 1880, Min. Mag., iv, 121, after Dr. 
John Walker, who discovered it. A syn. of pectolite. 

WALIiBRIAN. A, Breithaupt, 1865, Berg. Htlt., xxiv, 428, in 
honor of J. Q. Wallerius. A black var. of hornblende, thought to be 
triclinic. 



WALLBRIITB 285 WAVBLLITB 

WALLERIITB. Variant of valleriite. 

WALMSTBDTITIZ. K. 0. v. Leanhard, 1826, Leon. Orykt., 297 
(Walmstedtit). tifter Prof. L. P. Walmstedt, who had examined it. A 
yar. of magnesite containing manganese. 

WAIiPURGIN. See wnlpurgite. 

WAIiPURGITB. A, Weisbach, 1871, Jahrb. Min., 870 (Walpurgin), 
f. the Walpurgis vein, Freiberg. Suxony, its locality. Hydrous arsenate 
of bismuth and uranium, found in yellow, scale-like crystals. 

WALTHBRTTB. /. F. Vogh [1857, MineralJoach., 167], 1873, Zeph. 
Min. Lex., ii, 341, perhaps in honor of Oberbergnith Wulther of Vienna. 
Carbonate of bismuth, found in long, green or brown, transparent crystals. 

WAIiUBWlTB N. J. V. Kokacharow, 1877, Zt. Kryst., ii, 61 (Wulu- 
6wlt), in honor of P. A. von Wahicw. A var. of xanthopbyllite, occur- 
ring in distinct crystals. 

WAPPLBRTTB. A Fremel, 1874, Min. Mitth., 279 (Wapplerft), in 
honor of Benno Wappier. Hydrous arsenate of calcium and magnesium, 
found in minute, colorless crystals. 

WARINGTONITB. N. S. Maskelyne, 1864, Chem. News. x. 263, 
after K. W. Warington. who analyzed it. Avar, of brochantite, differing 
from llie ordinary form in some of its ph3'sical characteristics. 

WARRENTTB. L, O. Eakins, 1888. A. J. S.. 8d, xxxvi, 460, after 
E. R. Warren, who found it. Sulph-antimonide of lead, found in gray- 
ish-black, wool-like masses of crystals. 

WARRINQTONITB. Error for waringtonite. 

WARWIOKITB. a U. Shepard, 1838. A. J. 8.. xxxiv. 315. f. War- 
wick, N. Y., its locality. Borotitanate of magnesium and iron, found in 
black, prismatic crystals. 

WASHINQTONITB. C U. Sfiepard, 1842. A. J. S. , xliil, 366, f. 
Washington, Ct., its locality. A syn. of hystatite. 

WASITB. /. F. Bohr, 1862, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., xix, 421 
(Wasit). because he thought it contained the oxide of his new metal wasium. 
A highly altered allanite. in which the supposed oxide of wasium proved to 
be thoria. 

WATBR-SAPPHIRB. A jewellers' name for iolite. 

WATTBVILLITB. 8. Singer, 1879. Sing. Inaug.. 18 (Wnttevillit). 
ir honor of Baron Oscar de Watteville. of Paris. Hydrous sulphate of 
I'iilcium and sodium, found in minute, white, silky crystals. 

WAVBIililTB. W. Babbington, 1805, Phil. Trans.. 162. after Dr. 
Wm. Wavell, its discoverer. Hydrous phosphate of aluminum, found 
ir globular aggregates with a radiated structure. 

Also used by C, Detoeg, 1820. A. J. S., ii, 249. An obs. s^'u. of gibbsite. 



WAX-OPAIi 286 WHEEL-ORB 

WAX-OPAL. An early name for yellow opal with a waxy lustre. 

WZ3BNERITB. A. W. Stehner, 1894, Zt. Krist, xxiv, 125 (Web- 
nerit), after A. Webner from whom it was received. A var. of ziukenite 
containing silver. 

WBBSKYITB. R. Brauns, 1887, Jahrb. Min. Beil. Bd., v. 318 
(Webskyit), in honor of Prof? M. Websky. An uncertain alteration 
product of serpentine, of a pitch-black color. 

WBBSTBRITB. A. Brongniart, 1822, Hatty Min., 11, 125, after 
T. Webster, who discovered it. A syn. of aluminite. 

WBHRLITB. J. J. N. Huot, 1841, Huot Min., i, 188, after A. Wehrle, 
who analyzed it. Telluride of bismuth, found in foliated masses resem- 
bling tetradymite. 

Also used by F. v. Kohell, 1838, Kob. Min., 313 (Wehrlit). An obs. 
syn. of ilvaite. 

WBIBYBITB. F. G. Brogg&r, 1890, Zt. Kryst., xvi, 650 (Weibyeit), 
in honor of Prof. P. C. Weibye. Fluo- carbonate of the cerium metals^ 
near bnstnasite. 

WBISSIAN. E, F. Olocker, 1839, Glock. Min., 530, in honor of 
Prof. C 8. Weiss. An obs. syn. of scolecite. 

WBISSiaiTB. O, JenzscK 1853, Jahrb. Min., 396 (Weissigit). f. 
Weissig, Saxony, its locality. Orthoclase, found in small, reddish-white, 
twin crystals in amygdaloid. 

WBISSITB. H. O, TrolU'Wachtmeister, 1828, Pogg. Ann., xiv, 190 
(Weissit), in honor of Prof. C. S. Weiss. One of the many names given 
to the alteration products of iolite. 

WBRNBRITB. B. J. d^Andrada, 1800, Jour, de Phys.. li, 244, in 
honor of Prof. A. G. Werner. Silicate of aluminum and calcium, the 
most important member of the scapolite group. 

WBRTHBMANITB. A. Raimondi, 1878, Min. Perou, 244, after 
A. Wertheman, who discovered it. Hydrous sulphate of aluminum, 
found in soft, white masses. 

WBSTANITB. G. W. Blomstrand, 1868, Vet. Ak. Stock. Oefv., 
XXV, 208 (Westanit), f. Westana, Sweden, its locality. Hydrous silicate 
of aluminum, near w5rthite, found in red crystalline masses. 

WHARTONITB. 8. H. Emmens, 1892, Am. Ch. Soc. Jour., 209^ 
after Joseph Wharton, who has been intimately connected with the nickel 
industry of America. Nickeliferous pyrite, probably a mixture. 

WHBBLBRITB. 0. Loew, 1874, A. J. S., 3d, vii, 571, in honor of 
Lieut. G. M. Wheeler. A yellow fossil resin, found in fissures in lignite. 
WHBBL-ORB. A German miners' name, Rftdelerz, for boumonite- 
crystallized in wheel-shaped twins. 



WHBWBIiIJTII 287 WIOHLOWITB 

WHEWEIiUTB. H. J. Brooke and W, U. MilUr, ia'52, B. and M. 
Min., 623, in honor of Prof. W. Wbewell. Oxalate of lime, found in 
small, colorless crystals with brilliant lustre. 

WHTTB ANTIMONY. An carl}' name for valentinite. 

WHITE ARSZ3NIO. /. Hill, 1771, Hill Foss., 355, f. its color. 
A syn. of arsenolite. 

WHTTB OOBAIiT. A popular name for cobaltite. 

WHTTB OOPPBR. /. F, L Hausmann, 1847, Haus. Min.. i, 82 
Weisskupfer), f. its color and composition. An obs. syn. of domey- 
kite. 

WHTTB OOPPBRAS. A popnlar name for both goslarite and 
coquimbite. 

WHTTB FBLDSPAR. /. O, Walletnus, 1747, Wall. Min., 65 
(Feltspat hvit), f. its color. An obs. syn. of albite. 

WHTTB GARNBT. /. J, Ferber, [1778, Briefe aus Walschland, 
165], 1801, Reuss Min., (2). i, 396 (Weisse Grunaten), f. its color. An 
obs. syn. of leucite. 

WHTTB IRON ORB. An early name for siderite. 

WHTTB IRON PYRTTBS. A popular name for marcasite. 

WHTTB LBAD ORB. A popular name for cerussite. 

WHTTB NIOKBL. A, BreitJiaupt, 1845, Fogg. Ann., Ixiv, 184 
(Weissnickelkies), f. its color and composition. A syn. of both rammels- 
bergite and chloanthite. 

WHTTB OIJVINB. A syn. of forsterite. 

WHTTB PYRTTBS. An early name for arsenopyrite. 

WHTTB SILVBR ORB. /. O. WaUeHuB, 1747, Wall. Min., 812 
(Minera argenti alba), f. its color and composition. An obs. name for 
argentiferous tetrahedrite. 

WHTTBSTONB. A jewellers' name for quartz. 

WHITB TBLLURIUM. A popular name for sylvanite. 

¥rHITB VITRIOL. /. Q, WalleriuB, 1747, Wall. Min., 157 (Hvit 
Viktril). A syn. of goslarite. 

WHTTNBYTTB. F. A. Qenlh, 1859, A. J. S., 2d, xxvli, 400. in 
honor of Prof. J. D. Whitney. Arsenide of copper, found in fine, 
granular masses of reddish -white color. 

WICHTINB. Variant of wichtyne. 

WICHTYNB. See wichtisite. 

WICHTISTTB. A. Laurent, 1835. Ann. Ch. Phys., lix, 107 (Wich- 
tyne), f. Wichtis. Finland, its locality. A black, glassy substance, 
identical with sordavalite. 

WIOHIiOWTTB. A. d*Ae?Uardh 1888, Ach. Met., ii, 568 (Vichlo- 



WHiHBLMITB 288 WITHAMITB 

vite), f. Wichlow Co., Ireland, where it was found. A doubtful vana- 
date of lead. 

WUiHELMITIZ. Variant of willemite. 

WrLLCOZTTB. F. A. Qenlh, 1873, Am. Phil. Soc. xiii, 897, in 
honor of Col. J. Willcox. An alteration product of corundum, occur- 
ring in greenish scales with a pearly lustre. 

WUiliELMINB. Variant of willemite. 

WUiLBMITE. A, Levy, 1830, Jahrb. Min., i. 71 (Willemit). in honor 
of William I, of the Netherlands. Silicate of zinc, found in hexagonal 
prisms of various colors, also massive and in grains. 

WIIiUAMITB. Variant of willemite. 

WUililAMSITB. C. U. Sliepard, 1848, A. J. S.. 2d, vi. 249, after 
L. W. Williams, from whom it was received. An impure var. of ser- 
pentine of apple-green color. 

Also a variant of willemite. 

WUililAMSONITB. Error for williamsite (serpentine). 

WILOUITB. Variant of wiluite. 

WUiSONITB. T. 8. Hunt, 1853, Geol. Burv. Can. Rept. for 1862, 
170, after Dr. James Wilson, who discovered it. An altered scapolite, 
found in reddish, cleavable masses. 

WILUITB. Bcudl Severgin, 1802, Gall. Rec, 165 (Wilouite), f. the 
Wilui River, Siberia, its locality. A syn. of grossularite, iu eluding also 
vesuviauite from the same locality, which were at first not separated. 

WINBBBRGITB. C. W. v. Oumhel, 1879, Allgemeine und chemische 
Geologic, i, 239 (Winebergit), in honor of Forstrath L. Wineberger. A 
basic sulphate of aluminum, found with pissophanite. 

WINEIiBRTTB. A. BreWiaupi, 1872, Jahrb. Min., 816 (Winklerit), 
after Dr. C. Winkler, who analyzed it. An amorphous, black mineral, 
containing oxides of cobalt and nickel. 

WINKWORTHTTB. H. How, 1871, Phil. Mag., 4th, xli. 270, f. 
Winkworth. Nova Scotia, its locality. Hydroborosulphate of calcium, 
found in white nodules imbedded in gypsum. 

WISBRINB. A, Kenngott, 1864, Jahrb. Min., 484 (Wiserin), in 
honor of Dr. D. F. Wiser. Octahedrite from Switzerland, long thought 
to be xenotime. 

WISBRITE. F. Eaidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 498 (Wiserit), after 
Dr. D. F. Wiser, who had examined it. A doubtful hydrous carbonate 
of manganese, referred to pyrochroite. 

WITHAMITB. D. Brewster, 1825, Ed. Jour. Sci.. ii, 218, after Dr. 
H. Witham, who discovered it. A var. of epidote of rose-red or jrellow 
color. 



WTTHSRITB 289 WOLLASTONTTB 

WrrHBRITB. A. Q, Werner, 1789, Berg. Jour., i, 379 (Witheril), 
after Dr. W. Withering, who discovered it. Barium carbonate found in 
white or slightly yellowish crystals, and massive. 

WITTIOHBNITE. A. Kenngott, 1853. Eenng. Min., 118 (Wit- 
ticheuit), f. Wittichen, Baden, its locality. Sulphide of bismuth and cop- 
per, found in steel-gray crystals or coarsely- columnar musses. 

WrmOHTTB. F. V. Kobell, 1853, Kob. Taf., 13(Wittichit), f. Wit- 
tichen, Baden, its locality. A syn. of wittichen ite. 

WrmNaiTB. N, Nardemkwld, 1849. Nord. Atom. Ch. Win. Syst., 
110 (Wittingit), f. Witthigi, Finland, its locality. A syn. of neoto- 
cite. 

WOOHBINITB. A. FUchner, 1866, Zt Geol.. zviii, 181 (Wo- 
cheinit), f. Lake Wochein. Austria, near which it was found. A syn. 
of bftauxite. 

WOHLBRTTB. Th. Scheerer, 1848, Pogg. Ann., lix, 827 ( WOhlerit), 
in honor of Prof. Fr. WOhler. Columbosilicate of zirconium, calcium 
and sodium, found in yellow or brownish crystals. 

WOLOHTTB. W, Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb.. 564 (WOlchit), f. 
W5lch, Carinthia, its locality. A var. of bournonite. 

WOLCHON8KITB. Variant of wolchonskoite. 

WOLOHON8EOITB. A. A. Kdmmerer, 1881, Jahrb. Min., ii, 420 
(Wolchonskoit), in honor of Prince Wolkonskoy. A green, clay-like 
mineral, colored by chromium. 

WOLFAOHTTB. F, v. Sandberger, 1869, Jahrb. Min., 813 (Wol- 
fachit). f . Wolfach, Baden, its locality. Sulph-arsen-antimonide of nickel, 
found in small, brilliant crystals. 

WOLFRAM. See wolframite. 

WOIiFRASONB. B. P. Oreg and W. O. Leiiiom, 1854. Dana Mhi.» 
148, f. its composition. An obs. syn. of tungstite. 

WOIiFRAMITB. J. Q. WalleriuB, 1747, Wall. Min., 268 (Volfram), 
f. volf, ' wolf.' and ram (rahm), * froth,' from its earlier name Lupi spuma. 
Tungstate of iron and manganese, passing into hubnerite as the iron de- 
creases and the manganese increases. 

WOLFRAM-OOHRB. A popular name for tungstite. 

WOLF8BBRGITB. /. /. N. Euot, 1841, Huot Min.. 1, 193, f. 
Wolfsberg, in the Harz, its locality. An obs. syn. of jamesonite. 

Also used by /. Nieol, 1849, Nicol Min., 484. An obs. syn. of chal- 
coatibite. 

WOLLASTONITB. /. Lehman, 1818, Inst. Geol., iii, 198. in honor 
of Dr. W. H. Wollaston. Silicate of calcium, occurring in flat crystnls 
of white or gray color. (Over) 



WOIiLONGONGITB 290 ZANTHOOONITB 

Used ulso by T. TJiomson, 1836, Thorn. Min., i, 180. An obs. syn. 
of pectolite. 

WOLLONQONaiTB. B. SiUiman, Jr,, 1869, A. J. 8., 2d, xlviii, 
85, f. WoUougong, New South Wales, its locality. A carbouiferous 
shale, at first thought to be a true hydrocarbon. 

WOLNYN. J. Jonas, 1820, Uug. Min. Oryct., 26, after Prof. A. 
Wolny, from whom It was received. An obs. syn. of barite. 

WOOD-OOPPBR. A popular name for olivenite. 

WOOD-OPAL. A. O. Werner, 1789, Berg. Jour., 1, 890 (Holzopal). 
Wood silicified by opal instead of quartz. 

WOOD-STONB. A popular name for silicified wood. 

WOOD-TIN. A var. of cassiterite, which has a radiated structure 
and resembles dried wood. 

WOODWARDITE. A. ff. GhurcK 1866, Jour. Ch. Soc., 2d, iv, 131, 
in honor of Dr. S. P. Woodward. Sulphate of copper and aluminum^ 
found in minute, botryoidal concretions. 

WORTHITB. O. H. Hess, 1830. Pogg. Ann., xxi, 78 (W5rthit), after 
F. I. von Wftrth, its discoverer. A var. of sillimanite containing water, 
prob.-ibly us the result of alteration. 

WULFENTTB. W. Haidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 504 (Wulfenit), 
in honor of Freiherr von F. X. Wulfen. Molybdate of lead, found 
in brilliant crystals. 

WURTZUJTB. W. P. Blake, 1889, E. M. Jour., xlviii, 543, after 
Dr. H. Wurtz, in recognition of his work on hydrocarbon minerals. An 
elastic hydrocarbon, resembling uintahite in appearance. 

WURTZITB. a Friedel. 1861, C. R., lii, 985. in honor of Prof. 
C. A. Wurtz Zinc sulphide, crystallizing in the hexagonal system. 

ZANTHARSENITB. Variant of xanthoarsenite. 

XANTHIOSITB. Adam. 1869, Adam Tab.. 43, probably f. 

^avboi, ' yellow,' on account of its color. A doubtful arsenate of nickel, 
yellow and amorphous. 

XANTHTTANE. G. U. Shepard, 1856, A. J. S., 2d, xxii, 96, f. 
^aySoi, * yellow,' in allusion to its color. A light yellow alteration 
product of titauite. 

XANTHTTE. T. Thomson, 1828, Ann. Lye. N. Y., iii. 44, f. ^avBoS, 
'yellow,' from its color. A yellowish- brown var. of vesuvianite. 

XANTHOARSENITE. L. J. IgelstrOm, 1884, Bull. Soc. Min., vii, 
237, f. ^avBo^, 'yellow,' and arsenic, alluding to its color and composition. 
Hydrous arsenate of manganese, of sulphur- yellow color. 

XANTHOOONE. See xanthoconite. 

XANTHOCONITB. A. BreWiaupt, 1840, Jour. Pk. Ch., xx, 67 



XANTHOIiITIZ 291 ZONOTUTB 

(Xanthokon), f. ^avQoi, * yellow,' aud Kovi^, 'powder/ from the color of 
its streak-powder. Sulph-arsenide of silver, of orauge-yellow to browu 
color, and yellow streak. 

XANTHOIilTE. M. F. HeddU, 1879, Min. Mag., iii. 59, f. ^ri'Oo's, 
' yellow,' in allusion to its color, and A/Oo?. An impure var. of staurolite, 
of yellowish color. 

ZANTHOPHYLUTZ:. O. lioBe, 1840, Pogg. Ann., 1. 654 (Xautlio- 
pbyllit), f. ^aj'Oo?, 'yellow,* and (pvWov, *a leaf,' in allusion to its color 
aud foliated structure. Hydrous silicate of aluminuiu, magnesium and 
calcium, a member of the cliutouite group. 

ZANTHOPTRITBS. E. F. Glocker, 1839. Glock. Min., 821 (Xau- 
tbopyrite), f. ^ay06<i, 'yellow.' and pyrite. An obs. name for the yellow 
kinds of pyrite as distinguished from the white ones. 

ZANTHORTHITB. R, Hermann, 1848. Jour. Pk. Ch.. xliii. 112 
(Xanthorthit), f. |ay0o'5, 'yellow,' and orthite. An altered var. of 
orthite. of yellowish color. 

ZANTHOSIDBRrra. B, B, Schmidt 1851, Pogg. Ann., Ixxxiv. 
495 (Xauthosiderit), f. ^avOo^, 'yellow,' and a-iSr^fjo^, 'irou,' from its 
color and composition. Ferric hydrate, found in aggregations of silky 
needles or as yellow ochre. 

Also used by E. F. Qlacker, 1847, Glock. Syn., 65. An obs. syn. of 
copiapite. 

ZAPHYLIiITB. Error for daphyllite. 

ZSNOUTB. N. Nordanskiold, 1842 (read 1840), Soc. Sci. Fenn., 
i, 871 (Xenolit), f. ^4yo^, * a stranger.' and A{9o?. A var. of sillimanite 
of higher specific gravity than usual. 

ZBNOTIMB. F, 8. Beudani, 1882, Beud. Min., ii. 552, f. ^eVo?, 
iov Kevo^, 'vain,' and r/////, 'honor,' recalling the fact that the yttrium 
in it had been mistaken for a new metal. Phosphate of yttrium, found 
in crystals aud rolled grains of various colors. 

Variant of zeuxite. 
.. J. C. DelameVierie, 1806, Jour de Phys., Ixli, 850 (Xil- 
opale). f. ^vXov, 'wood,' and opal, from Holz-Opal, 'wood opal,' of which 
it is an obs. syn. 

ZIPHONITB. Q. Flaiania, [1898. Accad. Sci. Acireale, v], 1895, 
A. J. S., 8d, xlix, 480, f. Xiphouia, the name of an ancient city of Sicily, 
near which it was found. A var. of amphibole, found in minute, honey- 
yellow crystals. 

ZONALTTTB. See xonotlite. 

ZONOTLITE. C. F. liammelsberg, 1866, Zt. Geol., xviii. 33 
(Xonaltit), changed to xonotlit, 1875, Ramm. Min. Ch., 880 (Xonotlit), 



293 YTTERBITB 

f. Tetala de Xonotla, Mexico, its locality. A very tough, hydrous sili- 
cate of calcium, resembliug okeuite. 

XYLrrE. K. Hermann, 1845, Jour. Pk. Ch., xxxiv. 180 (Xylit), f. 
^vXov, 'wood,' which it resembles. An altered asbestos, occurring in 
brown, fibrous masses. 

ZTLOCHLORB. W. 8. v. Waliershawen, 1853, Walt. Vul., 297 
(Xylochlor), f. ^vXor, 'wood,* and x^^Poi* 'green,' in allusion to its 
color. An olive green var. of apopbyllite. 

XYLOORYPTTTB. C. A. Beequerel, 1819. Jour, de Phys., Ixxxix, 

287, f. quXoVf ' wood,' and Kpvnroi, ' concealed,' alluding to its mode of 

occurrence. An obs. syn. of scheererite. 
XYIiORBTIN. See xyloretinite. 

XYLORBTINITB. /. O, Forchhammer, [1839, Kong. Dan. Vid. 
Sels.], 1840, Jour. Pk. Ch., xx, 459 (Xyloretin), f. ^vXov, 'wood,' and 
f^rfTivTf, 'resin,' because found in fossil wood. A white resin derived 
from fossil wood. 

XYIiOTILB. E. F. Olockei\ 1847, Glock. Syn., 97 (Xylotil), f. ^vXov, 
'wood,' and rzA.o?, 'fibre,' alluding to its appearance. An altered 
asbestos, found in fine fibres of wood-brown color. 

YANOLITB. /. C. JDelameiliene, 1792, Delam. Sciag., i, 287, f. tor, 
' the violet.' in allusion to its color, and XiBo^, An obs. syn. of axinite. 

YBIiLOW ARSBNIO. A popular name for orpiment. 

YELLOW COPPERAS. A popular name for copiapite. 

YELLOW OOPPBR ORE. An early name for chalcopyrite. 

YBLLOW LEAD ORE. A. O. Werner, 1789, Berg. Jour., i. 384 
(Gelb-Bleierz), f. its color and composition. An obs. syn. of wulfenite. 

YELLOW OCELRB. A yellow, earthy var. of limonite, often con- 
taminated with clay. 

YELLOW TELLURIUM. A. Aikin, 1814. Aik. Min.. 71, f. its 
color and composition. An obs. syn. of sylvanite. 

YENTTE. C. H. Leltevre, 1807, Jour, des M., xxi. 65, f. Yena. 
(Jena), to commemorate the battle fought there. An obs. syn. of ilvaite. 

YONOLITB. Variant of yanolite. 

YOUNQITE. J. B, ffannay, 1877, Min. Mag., i, 152, in honor of 
Prof. John Young. Sulphide of lead, zinc and other metals, probably 
a mixture. 

YPOLBIMB. F. 8. Beudani, 1882, Beud. Min.. ii, 570, f. vTtoXeiMa, 
•remainder,' because it is what is left of copper phosphate after apherese 
has been taken from it. An obs. syn. of pseudomalachite. 

YTTERBITE. A. G. Ekeherg, 1797, Vet. Ak. Stock., xviii, 164 
(Yttersten), f. Ytterby, Sweden, its locality. An obs. syn. of gadolhaite. 



TTTBRITB 208 ZBOUTB 

TTTBRITZI. Variant of ylterbite. 

YTTRIALITIZ. W. E. Hidden and /. B. Mackintosh, 1889, A. J. 8., 
8d, xxxviii, 477, f. yttrium, alluding to its composition, and AzOoS. Sili- 
cate of the yttrium metals and thorium, found in amorphous, olive green 
masses. 

YTTBR-QARNBT. C. Bergemann, [1854, Nied. Ges. Bonn Verb.. 
July 18], 1855, Jahrb. Min., 888 (Yttergranat), f. its composition. A 
vnr. of andradite (garnet) containing yttria. 

TTTRTTB. Variant of ytterite. 

TTTROOAIiOITB. E. F. Q locker, 1889, Glock. Min., 664 (Y ro- 
calcit), f. its composition. An obs. syn. of yttrocerite. 

TTTROOBRBRTTB. Variant of yttrocerite. 

TTTROOBRTTB. J, O. Qahn and J. J. Berulius, 1816. Afh. i Fla., 
iv, 151 (Yttrocerit), f. its composition. Fluoride of calcium and the 
yttrium and cerium metals, usually of a yiolet color. 

TTTROOOLUBSBITB. A syn. of yttrotantalite. 

TTTROQUBIMITB. A, E. Nordenskiold, 1878. Geol. F5r. F5rh., 
iv, 31 (Yttrogummit). A decomposition product of cleveite, near gum- 
mite, and containing yttria. 

TTTROIIiMBNITB. R. Hermann, 1846, Jour. Pk. Ch., xxzviii, 
119 (Yttroilmenit), f. its composition, it being thought to contain a new 
metal, ilmenium. An obs. syn. of yttrotantalite. 

TTTROTANTAUTB. A, G. Ekeberg, 1802, Vet. Ak. Stock., 
zxiii, 80 (Yttrotantal), f. its composition. Tantalate of yttrium and 
other bases, found in black, brown or yellow crystals. 

YTTROTITANITB. Th. Scheerer, 1844, Pogg. Ann., Ixiii, 459 
(Yttro-Titanit). f. its composition. A syn. of keilhauite. 

ZABSTTTB. Error for zaratite. 

ZARATTTB. A, Casares, [1851, Rev. Min. Madrid, ii, 804], 1858, 
Berg. Hat., xii, 87 (Zamtit), in honor of G. Zamte, error for Zarate. 
Hydrous carbonate of nickel, found in emerald-green crusts. 

ZAVAUTB. Error for zaratite. 

ZBAOONTTB. C. G, Giitnondi, [1816, Osserv. Min. di Roma], 1817, 
Tasch. Min., xi, 164 (Zeagonit). f. C^ik. 'to boil,' and ayovo^, 'barren,* 
because it neither effervesces with adds nor intumesces before the blow- 
pipe. A syn. of gismondite. 

ZBASITB. E. LariffUre, 1826, Arch. Ges. Nat., vii, 406 (Zensit). in 
honor of Ambassador Zea, probably Don Francisco Zea. An obs. name 
for a var. of fire-opal. 

ZEOLTTB. A, CroneiedU 1758, Cronst. Min., 114 (Zeolfl). f. H^eiv, 
*to boil,' because it intumesces before the blowpipe, and A/fio5. Several 



ZBPHAROVIOHmi 294 ZINCOCAIiCITB 

species are included under tbis early name, notably natrolite and stilbite. 
It is now only used as a family name. 

ZEPHAROVICHTTS. B. Boricky, 1869, K. Ak. Wien, lix, (1), 593 
(Zepbarovicbit), in bonor of Prof. V. von Zepbarovicb. Hydrous pbos- 
pliate of aluminum, near variscite. 

ZERMATTITB. N. Nordenskwld, 1849, Nord. Atom. Cb. Min. 
Syst., 182 (Zermattit), f. Zermatt, Switzerland, its locality. A syn. of 
antigorite. 

ZBUOITB. A. A. Julien, 1865, A. J. S., 2d, xl, 373, f. t^evytTTf?, 
'yoked,' on account of its close connection witb ornitbite. A var. of 
metabrusbite, produced by alteration. 

ZBUNBRITB. A. Weinbach, 1872. Jabrb. Min., 207 (Zeunerit), in 
bonor of Director Qustav Zeuuer. Hydrous arsenate of uranium and 
copper, found in green, tabular crystals. 

ZBUXITB. T. Thomson, 1836, Tbom. Min., i, 320, f. CeC^iS, *a 
joining,' 'because it occura in tbe united mines, Cornwall,' Eng. An 
obscure mineral, probably tourmaline. 

ZBYIiANITB. Variant of ceylonite. 

ZIANITB Variant of cyanite. 

ZIBTRISIKITB. J, D. Dana, 1868, Dana Min., 733, f. Zietrisika. 
Moldavia, its locality. A wax-like bydrocarbon, differing only sligbtly 
from ozocerite. 

ZIGUBLINE. F. 8. Beudant, 1832. Beud. Min., ii, 713, adapted 
from Ziegelerz, ' tile-ore,' from its appearance. An obs. name for tile-ore. 

ZlLIiBRTHITB. J, C. Delametherie, 1795, Delam. T. T., i, 411, f. 
Zillertbal, Tyrol, its locality. An obs. syn. of actinolite 

ZIMAPANTTB. Adam, 1869, Adam Tab , 70, f . Zimapan, 

Mexico, Its locality. A very doubtful cbloride of vanadium. 

ZINO. Native zinc found as a mineral, tbe existence of whicb bas 
not been positively proved. 

ZINO ALUMINITB. A. Damour, 1881, Bull. Soc. Min., iv, 138, 
f. its composition. Hydrous sulpbate of aluminum and zinc, found in 
minute, wbite. bexagonal plates. 

ZINO-BLBNDB. See blende. 

ZINO-BLOOM. D. L. O. Karsten, 1808, Karst. Tab., 70 (Zink- 
blililie), f. its appearance. A syn. of bydrozincite. 

ZINOITB. W. Eaidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb.. 548 (Zinkit), f. its 
composition. Oxide of zinc, found in orange-yellow to deep red masses. 

ZINCKBNITB. Variant of ziukenite. 

ZINOOOALOITB. E. S. Dana, 1892, Dana Min., 269, f. its compo- 
sition. A var. of calcile, containing some carbonate of zinc. 



ZINCONINZ: 295 ZOISITB 

ZINOONINIZ. VariuDt of zinconise. 

ZINOONISB. F, 8. Beuda?U, 1833, Beud. Min., ii, 857, f. zinc and 
Kori?, * powder/ f. its composition aud mode of occurrence. An obs. 
syn. of hydrozincite. 

ZINO-SPAR. An early name for sniitbsonite. 

ZINO-SPINEL. K. J, Uaiiy, 1809, Hatty Tabl., §7 (Spinelle zinci- 
fSre), f. its composition. A syn. of gahnite. 

ZINC-VITRIOIi. A popular name for goslarite. 

ZINEAZURITE. A, BreithaupU 1852. Berg. HUt., xi, 101 (Zink- 
azurit), f. its composition aud color. A mineral found in small, blue 
crystals, probably a mixture of sulpbate of zinc aud carbonate of copper. 

ZINKENITI]. O. Host\ 1826, Pogg. Ann., vii. 91 (Zinkenit), in 
honor of J. K. L. Zincken. Sulph antimonide of lead, of steel-gray 
color aud metallic lustre. 

ZINKmi. Variant of zincite. 

ZINKOSITB. A. Breithaupt, 1852, Berg. HQt., zi, 100 (Zinkosit), f. 
its composition. A doubtful anhydrous sulphate of zinc. 

ZlNKPHYIiUTB. A. BreiViaupt, 1882, Breit. Char., 36 (Zink- 
Phyllit), f. zink, and (pvXXov, *a leaf,' probably because of its perfect 
cleavage. An obs. syn. of hopeite. 

ZINNWAIiDITZS. W. HaicUngcr, 1845, Haid. Handb., 521 (Zinn- 
waldit^ f. Zinnwald, Bohemia, its locality. A lithium-mica, near 
lepidolite. 

ZIPPBITB. W. Eaidinger, 1845, Haid. Handb., 510 (Zippeit), after 
Prof. F. X. M. Zippe, who had examined it. Sulphate of uranium, 
occurring in small, bright yellow needles. 

ZmOARBITB. C. U. Sliepard, 1876, Shop. Cat. Min., 8, f. its 
composition. An obscure mineral supjwsed to be carbonate of zir- 
conium. 

ZIRCON. Of obscure origin, perhaps from the same source as 
jargon, which it has often been called. Silicate of zirconium, found 
in tetragonal crystals of various colors. 

ZIROONITB. Variant of zircon. 

ZIREBLITE. E. Hussak and O, T. Prior, 1895, Min. Mag., xi, 80, in 
honor of Prof. F. Zirkel. Zirconate and tltanate of calcium, found in 
black octahedrons, resembling spinel. 

ZTRIilTB. A. Piehler, 1871, Jahrb. Min., 57 (Ziriit), f. Ziri, Tyrol; 
its locality. An amorphous hydrate of aluminum, resembling allopbane. 

ZOBIJTZITB. A. Frensel, 1874. Frenz. Min. Lex.. 851 (Z5blitzit). 
f. Z5blitz, Saxony, its locality. An impure, white serpentine. 

ZOISITB. A, Q. Werner, 1805, Jam. Min.. ii, 597, after Baron 



ZOLE8TINEI 296 ZTGADITB 

von Zois, of Laybach, Austria, its discoverer. Silicate of aluminum and 
calcium, found in columnar crystals of various colors. 

ZOLBSTINE. Tanant of celestine. 

ZONOOHIiORTTIZ. A, E. FoaU, 1878 (read 1873), Am. Assoc, xxl. 
G5, f. ^cDvn, *a baud/ and x^^po^» 'green/ in allusion to its structure 
:ui(I color. A mineral similar to chlorastroHte, found in green pebbles 
Willi H banded structure. 

ZORQITIZ. H. J. Brooke and W. H. Miller, 1852, B. and M. Min.. 
158, f. Zorga, Harz Mts., its locality. Selenide of lead and copper, 
found in lead-gray masses with a metallic lustre. 

ZUNTITB. W. F, Hillebrand, 1884. Colo. Sci. Soc. i, 124, f. the 
Zufiy mine, Colo., where it was found. Basic hydrofluosilicate of 
aluminum, found in minute tetrahedrons. 

ZURIilTE. V. Ramondini, 1818, Inst. Geol., iii, 210. in honor of 
the Chevalier Zurlo, an amateur naturalist of Naples. An obs. syn. of 
melilite. 

ZURIiONirH. Variant of zurlite. 

ZURTTTB. Error for zurlite. 

ZWIBSELm]. A. Breithaupi, 1841, Breit. Handb., ii, 299 (Zwiselit), 
f. Zwiesel, Bavaria, its locality. A clove-brown var. of triplite. 

ZYGADITB. A, Breithaupt, 1846, Fogg. Ann., lix. 441 (Zygadit), f. 
t^vyddrfv, * in pairs,' alluding to its occurrence in twin crystals. Yellow- 
ish or reddish albite, found in thin, tabular, twin crystals. 



INDEX TO THE AUTHORS OF MINERAL NAMES 



ABICH, W. H. 
Andesite 

ABILDQAABD, P. a 

Cryolite 
Malacolite 
Moroxite 
Rapidolite 

ACHIARDI. A. D» 

Fri^idite 

Levi^lianite 

Matildite 

Refcnolite 

Silvestrite 

Wicklowite 

ADAM, 

Aarite 

Aerugite 

Aithalite 

Arsenstibite 

Bernonite 

Bleirosite 

Bustamentlte 

Cacheutaite 

Calcio vol borthite 

Carbonyttriae 

Chenavixite 

Cooperite 

Corkite 

Cuproapatite 

Cuprotungstite 

Cuprovanodite 

Cyanoferrite 

Dauberite 

Dernbachite 

Epimillerite 

Erythroconite 

Ethiopsite 

Ferrozincite 

Qapite 

Oermarite 

Glasbachite 

Guadalcazite 

Hydrorutile 

Isabellite 

Ischelite 

Koehlerite 

Leptonematite 

Makite 

MessiD{rite 

Natrikalite 

Natrophite 

Nicomelane 

Nobillte 

Nolascite 

Flumbiodlte 

Plumbocuprite 



Pyrichrolite 

Pyritolamprite 

Rhodite 

Rhombarsenite 

Risseite 

Scacchite 

Tetalite 

Wackenrodite 

Xanthiosite 

Zimapaoite 

AGRICOLA, a 

Blende 

Fluorite 

Mountain green 

Petroleum 

Quartz 

Serpentine 

Talc 

Vitreous copper 

AICHHORN. S. 
Forcherite 

AIKIN, A. 

Black tellurium 
Emerald copper 
Graphic tellurium 
Uranite 
Yellow tellurium. 

ALGER, F. 

Braardite 

Hayesine 

IjanfiTRtafflte 

Rhenite 

Sterlingite 

ALGER, F.. and 
JACKSON, C. T. 

Acadialite 

ALLAN, R. 

Arsenical antimony 

ALLAN, T. 

Blue opal 

Gieseckite 

Gregorite 

ALLEN, O. D., and 
COMSTOCK, W. J. 

Tysonite 

ALLUAUD, F. 

Heterosite 
Hureaulite 



ANDERSON, T. 

Gyrolite 

ANDRADA, B. J. D* 

Acanticone 

Allochroite 

Aphrizite 

Coccolite 

Diopside 

Ichthyophthalmite 

Indicolite 

Petalite 

Sahlite 

Scapolite 

Spoduniene 

Wernerite 

ANDRfi, C. 0. 
Onegfte 

APJOHN, J. 

Jelletite 

Kilbrickenite 

Verrucite 

ARENTS. A. 
Partzite 

ARGENVILLE, A. J. D* 
Amazon stone 

ARPPE, A. E. 

Metaxoite 
Pfcrofluite 
Scotiolite 

ARZRUNI, A. 

Groddeckite 
Utahfte 

AUERB\rH.J..aiid 
HERMANN, R. 

Chiolite 

BABINGTON, W. 
Wavellite 

BACKSTROM, H., and 

BROGGER, W. 0. 

Dahllite 
Lazurite 

BAGGE, Ch. 
Trona 

BAHR, J. F. 

Sideroferrite 
Wastie 

297 



INDEX TO AUTHORS 



BARCENA. M. 


BEEINHABDI, J. J. 


BEUDANT.I.a. 










AIIUantliM 




BAUEK. M. 


LunuiW 


AlnbaodlM 
Aluniu 




BERNHARDt,J.J.,UMl 


AiunoRen 
ApSantslla 




BKANDES, R. 
Chloropal 






AplitlialoH 


ii..u>wiugaultitB 


BERTELE. Q. A. 


Ann ly til row 


BERTEI& Q. A. 


Ba^r^'ioe 




PhOHcUDlCe 


sSr 


BERTHIER, P. 


iSsKrm. 


BECHi. E-. and 


t\Tr::^,. 


^r;^i„. 


ME-VEOHIKI. 0. 


Frank linlte 


Bonnte 






Bnicile 




Hal loy Bite 


C^^donlw 


PorMte 


NoritrontW 


Carlpocertno 


Saviie 




Ca»ill^rile 


Sclitii-lderiM 




Cemreyrtie 


blusDlte 


BERTKARD. E. 


CI,aloa«ln<, 


BECK. L. C. 
R(>cliUndlte 


Hydrareyrite 


ClauBihallM 
robBltlie 


"SSi'V"' 


Hol;bdomenlt» 
BERWERTH, F. 




TangBwalte 


E^lbHne 


BECKER, 0. F. 


BERZELIU8,J.J. 


EuDibaloae 

ElilriH 




JExhjni^ 


Klu.-e.ine 


pp: 

Redinf-lonlle 


at 


Galliiinila 




HarklK 


giSBrtallte 


SMS?" 


BECQUEKEL, C. A. 


IJlliia lulcft 
Lobolte 




Xylocpspute 


MfWte 


Lebfrkiaa 


BEI.LEVUE, FL. db 




KSSt. 




FnlJiiiiBUlIP 


MrlinoM 






Mimprefx 


Semrline 


PjWrtllilr 


MOIlerliie 




H«l iron vitriol 




BENK6.a..BDdJAHN,K. 










Keop!a«i 




Tfllurk'blHrTiuUl 


lijckellnc 


BERDELL, T8. 


Telraphyltne 
Thorite 




Lionite 


VBiic|n»tiDlle 


Phil III 'Site 


PERGEMANN, 0. 




Proimlio 


Krantiile 


BERZBUITS. J. J., ud 


OranEitB 


AlblW.' 




Sl.leHte 


Yttrocerite 




Ytieritiniet 


BERZFLIU3, J. J., and 


Bldemine 


BERLIN-. N. J. 


HIRWGER. W. 


Aphrodit« 


Cerlle 




BERUN, N. J., and 


PyrophysftliW 


Sp««artilB 


WEIBYE. P. C. 


BETTENDORF,A..«lld 


SUtiiille 
Sltblc^Dlle 




LA3AULX. A. V0» 


Triiomtle 




ytibine 



BEDD4NT(ron«„««l) 

S5,r.„. 

Xmotlma 
ZJt[itr>llae 



Zinc 



i>J«e 



BINNEY. M,. Md 

Thomson; i^ 

BLAA8, J, 

MetarolUoe 
BLaKB, J. 



BLAKB. W. p. 

Ohalcbulte 
CllaochJore 
Uin Labile 
Wurtillno 

BL0MSTR4ND, C. W 
Alxhedlte 
Arctollu 
ArgyraDTrrhothw 

Aujellte 

Burrlfie 

Berflnrt, 

BrOKg^rttB 

ChalcoiQlcllta 

oItX""''"*"*"" 



ViUlerlfie 

Waslaalts 

BLUH, J. R. 

Oslcoferrtte 

BLDm, J. R ,_ J 

siibiiis 

BLOMRICH. J. 

BOCK, Q, M. 

^"•Knochramlle 
BOMaRE. V. „ 

BOMBICCI, L. 

«un.l>«rropb«ne 

B0N3DOKFF p . ,^ 

Aurajlle " ■ "■ ™» 

gteinroilta 

R>umit« 



iyj>EX TO AUTBOBS 

BONVOrSIN, B 

Alallie 

l^uccinlM 

Topuollta 

BOOT. B. Di 

Lapis Uzul] 
BOOTH, J. c. 

Rfmlntttonlto 
BORICKY, E. 
ParaiikBrlM, 
0™.,otII 
Zepburovlchlta 
BORN, I. VON 
Anilirmoollta 
graphicMid 
Lllallw""* 
MolybUic silvM. 
BOSCDAVTio 



BOOSSINOAULT, J. 

ARpbaltena 

G^u«ltB 

Petrolene 
BO WEN, Q. T. 

SUllmonlte 
BRACKETT R W ., 

Nowtonlie 

RectorltB 

BRaNDE, W t 

I Mlnen.1 ad'lp^etra 

brandeb. B. 

' Buebolilie 
BHANDE9 and 
BKIS-HARDI 
»«B«imeiBDt and 

' BHAUNS, B. 

BRAUya. R a_rt 

BHEifiLAK, & 
Abrulte 




300 



INDEX TO AUTHORS 



BREITHAUPT {canVd) 

Embrithite 

Enanrite 

Epipbosphorite 

Erian 

Euchrolte 

Eulytine 

Euzeolite 

FauHerite 

Ferberlte 

Ferrowolframite 

Firebleiide 

Fliiocerite 

FritzNcbeite 

Oalapektite 

GaniHifrredite 

Ganomatite 

Geierite 

GiaKerite 

Globodite 

Greenlandite 

Gumniite 

Halochalzite 

Helpline 

Hedyphane 

Hepalin 

Hermesite 

Heterocline 

Homichlin 

Htlitenb<frgrite 

fi jdrohematite 

Hyd ropy rite 

Hypoimferite 

Hypotyphite 

Indigo copper 

Iridosmine 

Jalpaite 

Jarosite 

Josnaite 

Kakochore 

Koelbiiigite 

Koriiite 

Kraurite 

KupferphyUite 

Kupholite 

Kupreine 

Kastelite 

Kymatine 

KyroHite 

Lavendulan 

Libethenlte. 

Lime harmotome 

Lithiophorite 

Lonchidite 

Lophoite 

Loxoclase 

Mallhacite 

Ma n^an graphite 

Manganocalcite 

Mn nganowolf ramite 

Marti t« 

Megabasite 

Mefirabromite 

Melopsite 

Mesitite 

Metaxite 

Microbromite 

Microcline 

Miesite 

Mimetesit© 

Monazite 

Motinphane 

Miildan 

Myelin 



NeedI«>-fron8tone 

Neotype 

Nickelarreen 

Normauo 

Ochran 

Ogcoite 

Oligoclase 

Oravitzite 

Ortboclase 

Oserskite 

Osmelite 

Ostranite 

Oxalite 

Paclte 

Paradoxite 

Peganlte 

Peponite 

Pericline 

Phacolite 

Phffistine 

Phlagoplte 

Phosgenite 

Photolite 

Pinguite 

Pissophanite 

Pistomesite 

Placodine 

Plagioclase 

Pleuroclase 

Plinian 

Plumbeine 

Plumbostibnite 

Poikilite 

Polianite 

Pollux 

Poly hyd rite 

Polysplieerite 

Prasine 

Pseud oapatite 

Pierolile 

Pycnotrope 

Pyrauxite 

lyrgoni 

I^-rochrotlte 

Pyrrhotine 

Hadauite 

Raimondite 

Reichite 

Retinite 

Ricliterite 

Riemannite 

RSttiRite 

Rubellan 

Rutenite 

Safflorite 

Sandbergerite 

Sardinian 

Scorodlie 

Rebesite 

Serbian 

Siderodot 

Sideroplesite 

Smectite 

Snarumite 

Soniniaite 

Spartaite 

Spiauierite 

Stirian 

Striegisan 

Stttbelite 

Stylobat 

Succinite 

SyinpJesite 

Syntagmatite 

Tachylyte 



Tankltf) 

Tarnowitdte 

TantocJin 

Tautolite 

Tectlcite 

Tephroite 

Tetartine 

Thalackerite 

Thalbeimite 

ThromboUte 

Thurinfrite 

Tombaziie 

Triploclase 

Uranocbalcite 

Uranphyllite 

Valenciauite 

Variacite 

Yermontite 

Yiolan 

Wallerian 

White nickel 

Winklerite 

Xanthoconite 

Zinkazurite 

Zinkosile 

Zinkphyllite 

Zwiesohte 

Zygadile 

BREITHAUPT. A., and 
FRITZSCHE, C. J. 

Conichalcite 

BREITHAUPT. A., and 
PLATTNER, K. F. 

Glaucodot 

BREWSTER, DAVID 

Comptonite 

Gmeiinlte 

Hopeite 

Le^ynite 

Leucocyclite 

Oxhaverite 

Tesselite 

Wiihamlte 

BREZINA, A. 

Herrengrundite 

Schneeberg^te 

Strtlverite 

BRISTOW, H. W. 

Alley Ptone 

LentuUte 

Ollite 

Vierzonite 

Vitriolite 

BROCCHl, G. B. 
Breisiakite 

BROGGER, W. C. 

Anuerddite 

Barkevlkite 

Calciothorfte 

Cappelenite 

Caryocerlte 

Cerhomilite 

Eudidyinite 

Harabergite 

Hiortdahlife 

Johnstrupiie 



INDEX TO AUTUORS 



301 



BROGGER ieontinued) 

Ijavenite 
Melanocerite 
Nordenskifildlne 
Rosen bu8chite 
Welbyeiie 

BROGGER, W. C. and 
BACKSTROM. H. 
See BackstrOm. 

BROMEIS, J. C. 

Flchtelite 
Ositeolite 

BRONGNIART, A. 

Bustamite 

Dufrenite 

Glauherite 

Lii^nite 

Nacrite 

Fieri re 

Webgterite 

BROOKE. H. J. 

Arfvedsouite 

Aricite 

Barytocalcite 

Brew8tente 

Carintbite 

Cbildrenite 

Cleavelandite 

Culebrite 

Euchys-dnrlto 

Francr>lite 

Gorlandite 

Heulaudiie 

Xlmenite 

Latrobite 

Blencrite 

MontioelUte 

Napolite 

Nuttallite 

Percy lite 

Poonalite 

Riolite 

Somervillite 

Strahlite 

Str6niite 

Thomsonite 

BROOKE. H J., and 
MILLKR, W. H. 

AfT'iesite 

Annaber^te 

Aiitunile 

Chessyllfe 

Garnsdorflte 

KUhnite 

Lehmannite 

I^hrbachite 

Remolinite 

Tama rite 

Towanite 

Whewellite 

Zorgite 

BRUCKNER, U 

Oeomyriclfe 
Leucopetrite 

BRUHNS. W., and 
BUSZ, K. 
Phosphosiderite 



BRUNNER, J. 
Micaphilire 

BRUNN-NEERGARD.T. C. 
Hadynite 

BRUSH. G. J. 

Cookeite 

Duranfcite 

Hortonolite 

JeflTeritdte 

Ki^ohtiniite 

Klaprotholite 

Ralstonite 

Roepperiie 

Su88exite 

BRUSH, G. J , and 
DANA, E. S. 

Dickinsonite 

Eospliorite 

Eucrypilt** 

Falrfleldite 

Fillowite 

Llthiophilite 

Natrophilite 

Reddinsrite 

Triploidite 

BRUSH. O. J . and 
PENFIELD, 8. L. 

Sfoviliiie 
BUCKING. H. 

Siilpboborite 
BUKEISEN, F. 

Puflerite 

BUSZ, K. 
Kamarezite 

BUSZAND BRUHNS 

See Bruhns and Buaz 

CARL'^SON, C. P. 
Peplolite 

CARNOT. A. 
Liickiie 
Mai lard ite 
Meyinacite 

CAS A RES, A. 

Morenoaite 
Zaratite 

CASASECA. J. S. 
Thenardite 

CATHREIN, A. 
Calciosi routianite 

CESARO. G. 
Koninckite 

CESARO. G.. and 
DESPRET. G. 
Richellite 

CHAPMAN. E. J. 

Aikiiiire 

Aiinantine 

Anhydro-ferrite 

Anthraxolite 

Calcite 

Capillose 

Chromoferrite 

Donacarpryrite 

EuchloroM) 



Hartmannite 

Henkelite 

Hydroferrite 

Kermexjte 

Leirochruite 

MaK:ne8fv<;aIcite 

Blelanterite 

Mohsine 

Pb«)8phyttrite 

Psetido-aiidalusite 

Riil)erite 

Spar tal ite 

Titanloferrite 

Uranateninite 

CHARPENTIER. J. G. F.v. 

Ci>uzerauite 
Picotite 



CHATARD, T. M. 
Liicasiie 

CHESTER, A. H. 
CaBwellite 

CHURCH, A. H. 

Bayldonite 

Borallnckire 

Naiiiaqiialite 

Pelajrite 

Restormelite 

Tallintrite 

Ta^manite 

Wood ward ite 

CLARK. J . and 
MAC OHIE, T. B. 

Transvaalite 

CLARKE. E. D. 

B*'rzelite 
Chiinborazite 
Holmile 
Leelite 

CLARKE, F. W. 
Hydronephelite 

CLARKE. F. W , and 
PERRY, N. W. 

Gunnisonite 

CLARKE. F. W.. and 
SCH.VEIDER. E. A. 
Hydroclinionite 

CLARKE. W. B. 

Garnlerite 

CLEAVKLAND, P. 
Haydenite 

CLEMSON. T. 
Seybertite 

CLEVE. P. T. 
Bartholomite 
Resanite 

COLLIER, P. 
Uranotborite 

COLLINS. J. H. 
Diiporthite 
Eny«!lre 
Henwondite 
Peiiwithittt 



302 



INDEX TO AUTHORS 



COMSTOCK, W. J. 
See ALLEN and 

COMSTOCK 

CONNELL, A. 
DyRclasite 

CONWENTZ, H., and 
HELM, O. 

Simetite 

CONYBEARE, J. J. 
Hatchetine 

COOKE, J. P. 

Cryophyllite 

Culsag:eeite 

Danalite 

Melanosiderite 

Sterlingite 

COOKE, J. P., and 
QOOCH, F. A. 

Pelhamite 

CORDIER, L. 

Dichroite 

Dysodile 

Manganepidote 

COSSA, A. 
Hieratite 

COSTA, E. M. DA 
Rhombic quartz 

COVELLI, N..and 
MONTICELLI. T. 

Biotine 

Cavolinite 

Christ ianite 

Cutunnite 

Davyne 

Humboldtilite 

COX, E. T. 

Floridite 
Indiana! te 

COX. S. H. 
Hectorit© 

CROERNING 
Sinkanite 

CRONSTEDT, A. 
Blue zeolite 
Helleflinte 
Nickel ochre 
Nickel vitriol 
Pitch-blende 
Zeolite 

CROOKES, W. 
Tammite 

CROSS, W., and 
HILLEBRAND, W. F. 
Elpasolite 

CROSS, W.. and EAKINS, 
L. G. 
Ptilolite 

CUMENGE, E. 
Guejarite 



CUMENGE E , and 
MALLARD, E. 

Boleite 

DAHLL. T. and 
FORBES, D. 

Alvite 
Braeite 
Tyrlte 
Urdite 

damour, a. 

Alluaudite 
. Bertrandite 
Brongniardite 
Castelnaudite 
Cbloroinelanite 
Descloizite 
Dufrenoysite 
Erythrozincite 
Faujasite 
Goyazite 
Hjdraapatite 
Jacobsite 
Jadeite 
Jeremeievite 
Romeite 
Titanolivine 
Vanasquite 
Zinc aluminite 

DAMOUR. A., and 
DES CLOIZEAUX, A. 

Chalcomenite 

Otrrelite 

Picroepjdote 

DAMOUR A., and 
RATH, G. VOM 

Kentrolite* 
Trippkeite 

DANA, E. S. 

Baricalcite 

Beryllonite 

Bushmanite 

Cenite 

Cuprobismutite 

Frenzelite 

Haploiiie 

Haplotypite 

Selenolite 

Zincocalcite 

Dana and BRUSH 
See Brush and Dana 

DANA, E. S., and WELLS, 
H L. 
Durdenite 
Selen-tellurium 

Dana, J. D. 

Allopalladium 

Almagrerite 

Ammiolite 

Andradite 

Annite 

Antiiiioiiial copper 

Argentopyrite 

Arsenolite 

Aurotellurite 

Azorite 

Barite 

Bechilite 



Berzelianite 

Bindheimite 

Bismite 

Bismuth nickel 

Bismuthinite 

Blakeite 

Bobierrite 

Borickite 

Bosjeiiianite 

Bowenite 

Bredbergite 

Brewsterlinite 

Bromyrite 

BrQcknerellite 

Bucaramangite 

Bunsenite 

Butyrellite 

Cabrerit© 

Calciocelestite 

Calcioferrite 

Callainite 

Carminite 

Carnatite 

Celestobarite 

Cervantite 

Chalcocite 

Chanarcillite 

Chenocoprolite 

Chilenite 

Cho<lnefflte 

Claudetite 

Connellite 

Cryptolinite 

Cyanochroite 

Dobschauite 

Erubescite 

Ferrocalcite 

Ferrocobaltit© 

Gearksutite 

Genthite 

Geocerellite 

Geocerit© 

Grothite 

Gummite 

Bowlite 

Huascolite 

Huyssenite 

HydrobuchoIzitO' 

Hydroc&lcite 

Hydrodolomite 

Hydrosteatite 

lodyrite 

Iron boracite 

Jenzechite 

Kalinite 

Koettigite 

Leedsite 

Leucau^ite 

Magnesioferrite 

Manciuite 

Manganese alum. 

Mauilite 

Melanellite 

Meliphanite 

Mendozite 

Michaelsonite 

Misylite 

M0I3 site 

Muscovite 

Niccolite 

Noralite 

Nordmarkite 

CEliacherite 

Palladium gold 

Picrotephroite 



INDEX TO AUTHORS 



303 



DANA (continued) 

Picrotitanite 

Plumboresinite 

Porcellophite 

Porpezite 

Prochlorite 

Pseudoalbite 

Pyroretinite 

Pyrostilpoite 

Retinellite 

Retzite 

Reussinite 

Rhodium Rold 

Rhombic mica 

Rochlederite 

Samoite 

Sartorite 

Schlanite 

Schwartzembergite 

Selensilver 

Senarmontite 

Settling stones resin 

Siegenfte 

Soda copperas 

Stanekite 

Stibiiite 

Succinellite 

Sulpha tite 

Tammela-tantalite 

Tannenite 

Tavistockite 

Taylorite ' 

Tengerite 

Teschemacherite 

Thomsenolite 

Tung8tite 

Uddevalite 

Ulexite 

Urpethite 

Vanadic ochre 

Voglianite 

Volgerite 

Zietrisikite 

DANA, J. Fm and 
Dana, 8. L. 

Chelmsfordite 

DANA, S. L. 
Canaanite 

DANHAUSEB, J. 

NuBsierite 

DARAPSKY, L. 

Aromite 

Castanite 

Elaeite 

Flaveite 

Niveite 

Paposite 

Rubrite 

StUvenite 

Violite 

DAUBENTON, L. J. M. 
Houillite 

daubr£e, a. 

Lawrencite 
Staguiatite 



DAUBRfiE. G. A. 
Plombierite 

DAVY, H. 
Hydrargillite 

DECHEN, E. H. C. 
Glance spar 



VON 



DELAMfiTHERIE, J. C. 

Aluminilite 

Amianthoide 

Andalusite 

Andreas bei^olite 

Andreolite 

Armenite 

Barytite 

Baudisserite 

Boulonite 

Ceylonite 

Chrysopal 

Crispite 

Cruclte 

Daourite 

Elastic bitumen 

Emeraudine 

Epsomite 

Geyserite 

Hallite 

Hecatolite 

Heliolite 

Hyacinthiw 

Hyacinthoide 

Keratite 

Koreite 

Lehmanite 

LeucoUte 

Magnesite 

MeUlite 

Molarite 

Montmartrite 

Oisanite 

Pictite 

Pissite 

Uetinite 

Roubschite 

Bommite 

Staurolite 

Thallite 

Tyrolite 

virescite 

Volcanite 

Voraulite 

Xilopal 

Yanolite 

Zillerthite 

DELESSE, A. 

Buratite 

Damourite 

Dumasite 

Sismondite 

Vosgite 

DELFF8, F. W. H. 
See Blum and Delffs 

De LISLE, ROMfi 

Red schorl 
Spathic iron 
Violet schorl 

DEL RIO 
See Rio 



DES CLOIZEAUX, A. 

Bastonite 

Binnite 

Cliuohumite 

Cuproferrite 

Cyclopeite 

Dillenburgite 

Dolianite 

Montebrasite 

Pyrrholite 

Serpierite 

Settlingite 

Talc chlorite 

DES CLOIZEAUX, and 
DAMOUR 

See D AMOUR and 

DBS CLOIZEAUX 

DESPRET, G. 

See Cbbaro and 
Dbspret 

DEWEY, CHESTER 
Cummingtonite 

DICK, A. 
Geikielite 

DIETZE, A. 

Darapskite 

lodchromate 

Lautarite 

DIOSCORADES, P. 

Pittasphalt 
Pyrite 

DOBBIE, J. J. 
Cathkinite 

DOBEREINEB, J. W. 

Eschwegite 
Enebelite 

DOLOMIEU, D. G. 
Fassaite 

DOLTER, C. 

Dumrcicherite 

Duxite 

Koeflachite 

DOMEYKO, I. 

Bolivite 

Daubreite 

Kr6hnkite 

Phillipite 

Taltalite 

Taznite 

Tocornalite 

DORING, A. 
Brackebuschite 

DR£E, E. db 

Cereolite 

Hydrolite 

Klaprothite 

DUCLOUX, X. 
Rivotite 



304 



INDEX TO AUTHORS 



DUFRENOY, A. 

Acanthoide 

Arseniosiderite 

Beauzite 

Beekite 

Bishopvillite 

Bordite 

Churchillite 

Claussenite 

Confoiensite 

Delanouito 

Dreelite 

Fiinkite 

QsBbhardite 

Getlrite 

Qibsonite 

Greencite 

Haarcialite 

Herbeckite 

Horronite 

Jiiiickerite 

Koodilite 

Molaawite 

Odite 

Origjerfvite 

Peiitlandiie ' 

Suinmervillite 

Triphanite 

Villai-site 

DUMAS, J. 
Idrialite 

DUMONT, A H. 
Delvauxite 

DURAND, E. 
Aragotite 

EAKIN8, L. G. 
Warrenite 

EAKINS and CROSS 
See Cross and Eakims 

EATON, A. 
Schoharite 

EDWARDS, G 
Leather stone 

EKEBERG, A. G. 

AutomoUte 

Sodaite 

Taiitalite 

Thulite 

Ytterbite 

Yttrotantalite 

EKMAN. G. 
Huminite 

ELDERHORST, Wm. 
Marion ite 

EMMERLING, L. A. 
Cubic zeolite 

EMMEN8, S H 

Blueite 

Foiflrerlte 

Wbartonire 



EMMONS, E. 

Chiitonite 

Deweylite 

Eupyrchroite 

RensselsBrite 

Terenite 

ENDLICH, F. M. 

Henry ite 
Pealite 

ENGSTROM, N. 
Hydrorhodonite 

ERDMANN, A. 

BaniUte 

Esinarkite 

Keilliauite 

Monradite 

Mosanddte 

Praseolite 

ESMARK. J. 

^girite 

Datolite 

Igloite 

Leucophanite 

Prunnerite 

Radioiite 

ESMARK, H. M. Th. 

Erdmannite 

Euthalite 

Freyalibe 

ESTNER, F. J. A. 
Crocalite 

EVANS, J. T. 
Coiemanite 

FABER, W. L. 
Carrollite 

FEIT. W. 
Kaliborite 

FELLENBERG. R. L, VOU 
Studerite 

FERBER, J. J. 
White garnet 

FERNANDEZ, V. 
Guanajuatite 

FERNANDEZ, V., aod 
NAVIA. S. 
Silaonite 

FIEDLER, K. G. 
Chalcochlore 
Chlorite 8par 
Rhodochrome 

FIELD, F. 
Algodomte 
Alison ite 
Guayacanite 

FIELD. F., and 
MASKELYNE, N. S. 
Ludlamite 

FINCH, J., HORTON, W., 
and MATHER, W. W. 
Clintonite 



FIRTSCH, G. 
Rumpflte 

FISCHER VON WALD- 
HEIM, G. 

Agaphite 

Calaite 

Glaucolite 

Johnite 

Keffekilite 

Odontoiite 

Olyntholite 

Ratofkite 

FISCHER, H. 

Bischoflte 
Bhiinite 

FISCHER. H., and 
NESSLER, J. 

Eiisynchite 

FLAJOLOT, 

Nadorite 

FLECHNER, A. 
Wocheinite 

FLETCHER, L. 

Baddeleyite 

Cliftonite 

Daviesite 

FUGHT, W. 

Edmondsonite 
Evigtokite 

FLIGHT. W , and 
MASKELYNE, N. & 

Vaalite 

FUNK, G. 

Epididymite 

Harstjgite 

Heliophyllite 

Iron schefferite 

Langbanite 

Mangaiiomagnetite 

Ochrolite 

Pinakiolite 

Rhodotilite 

Trinierite 

FLUG, K. K. 
Ignatieffite 

FLURL, M. 
Stanzaite 

FCERSTNER, H. 

Cossyrite 

FOOTE, A. E. 
Zonochlorite 

FOOTE. W. M. 
Northupite 

FORBES. D. 
Darwinite 
Evan^ite 
KroBberite 

FORBES and DAHLL 
See Dahll and Forbes 



INDEX TO AUTHORS 



305 



FORCHHAMMER, J. G. 

Baulite 

Boloretine 

Hafnefjordite 

Hverlera 

Hversalt 

Krablite 

KrisuTigite 

CErstedTte 

Phylloretin 

Tekoretin 

Xyloretinite 

FORIR, H.j and 
JORISSEN, A. 

Destinezite 

FOULLON, H. V. 
Rhodusite 

FOURNET, J. 
Voltzite 

FOWLER, S. 
Pseudoiite 

FRANCKE, H. H. A. 

Hemiopai 
Noseiite 

FREIESLEBEN, J. K. 

Calcite 
Fettboi 
Tharandite 

FRENZEL, A. 

As:ricolite 

Amarantite 

Bismutoferrite 

Chlorotile 

Gordaite 

Heterogenite 

Hohmanoite 

Kyliodrite 

Lautite 

Limbachite 

Miriquidite 

Pucherite 

Quetenite 

Sarawakite 

Tritochorite 

Urusite 

Wapplerite 

Z5blitzite 

FRIEDEL, C. 

Adamite 

Delafossite 

Wurtzite 

FRITSCH, K. vow 

Reinite 
Relssite 

FRITZSCHE, C. J. 
Neftpril 

FRITZSCHE and 
BREITHAUPT 

See Breithaupt and 

FRITZSCHE 



FROBEL, J. 

Hessite 
Ullmannite 

FROBFL, J., and 
SCHWEIZER, E. 

Penninite 

FUCHS, J. N. 

Ekebergite 
Gehlenite 
Iron apatite 
Lasionite 
Melaucblore 
Porcelain spar 
Triphylite 
Wagnerite 

FUCHS, J. N., and 
GEHLEN, A. F. 

Mesolite 
Scolecite 

GADOLIN, J. 
Steinheilite 

GAHN, J. G. 

See Berzblius and 
Gahn 

GALLITZIN, D. DE 

Asparagolite 

Atacamite 

Cajuelite 

Hoenfnerite 

Inolite 

GASTALDI, B. 
Cossaite 

GAUTIER, A. 
Minervite 

GEHLEN, A. F. 

See FucHS and Gehlem 

GENTH, F. A. 

Aguilarite - 

Argentobismutite 

Bamhardtite 

Calaverite 

Coloradoite 

Cosalite 

Dudleyite 

Ferro tellurite 

Hydrocuprite 

Kerrite 

Lansfordite 

Maconite 

Magnolite 

Melonite 

Montanite 

Nickel gymnite 

Oweait« 

Penfleldite 

PbORphuranylite 

Psittacinite 

Rhodophyllite 

Schirmerite 

Srrontianocalcite 

Thiorsauite 

Whitneyite 

Willcoxite 



GENTH. F. A , and 
PENFIELD, S. L. 

Nesquehonite 

GERHARD, C. A. 
Amausite 

GERMAR, E. F. 

Chrismatite 

Hydropite 

Photicite 

GESNER, C. 
Osteocolla 

GIBBS, GEORGE 
Brucite 

GIESECKE, C. L. 

Elbaite 

Nectilite 

Sapphirine 

GIRARD, H. 
HoBvelite 

GISMONDI, C. G. 

Latialite 
Zeagonite 

GLADSTONE, G., and 
GLADSTONE, J. H. 

Hovite 

GLOCKER, E. F. 

Achtaragdite 

Alinite 

Apnrochalcite 

Apjobnite 

Argyrite 

Arsenocrocite 

Arsenopyrite 

Arsenosiderite 

Barytocelestite 

Barytopbyllite 

Belouite 

Bism utolamprite 

Botryte 

Biityrite 

Celadonite 

Ceramohalite 

Chaicophacite 

Chalcobtaktite 

Chalcostibite 

Chalcotricbite 

Chalybite 

Cyanotricbite 

Cuprite 

Daupbinite 

Edenite 

Flussyttrocalcite 

Flussyttrocerit© 

Galenoceratite 

Glaucosiderite 

Gold opal 

Graulite 

Halite 

Halotricbite 

Hydrocerite 

Hydrolanthanite 

HydrosideHte 

Hypargyrite ipver) 



806 



INDEX TO AUTHORS 



G LOCKER ic<mtinued) 

Iron rutile 

I<4ophane 

Llmnite 

Linarite 

Liparite 

Ma^netopyrite 

Mansranollte 

Melinite 

Mendipite 

Oriehalcite 

Oropion 

Ozocerite 

Phoeuicrochroite 

Phosnhorochalcite 

Poikilopjrite 

Polyrelite 

Przibramite 

Psathyrite 

Psimvthite 

Pyrantimonite 

Pyrarjfyrite 

Pyrostibite 

Saccharite 

Schrotterite 

Sepiolite 

Siderochalcite 

Smelite 

Sphalerite 

Steatoid 

Stibiogalenite 

Stillolite 

Stilpnomelane 

Stypterite 

Teratolite 

Tomosite 

Trichopyrite 

Unehwarite 

Weissian 

Xanthopy rites 

Xylotile 

Yttrocalcite 

GMELIN, J. F. 

Fayalite 
Ittnerite 
Mellite 

G<EBEL, A. 
Mamanite 

GOLDSMITH, E. 

Hexa^onite 

Kauaiite 

Metagadolinite 

Souomaite 

Stibianite 

Stibioferrite 

Trautwinite 

Viaudite 

GONNARD, F. 

Ceypsatite 

Dumortierite 

Offretite 

GOOCH, F. A. 

See Cooke and Qoooh 

GRAILICH, J. 
Roemerite 



GRATTAROLA, G. 

Beccarite 

Hydrocastorite 

Oryzite 

Pseudonatrolite 

Rosterite 

GREG, R. P. 

Conistonite 

Heddlite 

Matlockite 

GREG, R. P., and 
LETT80M, W. G. 

AmethvRtoline 

Cliftonite 

Cromfordlte 

Daphyllite 

Molywlite 

Ratholite 

Rosstrevorite 

Torbanite 

Wolframine 

OREGOR, Wm. 
Menaccanite 

GRONINGEN, , and 

OPPEU A. 

Kieselaluminite 

GROTH, P. 

Boromaf^esite 
Dominate 

GROTTHAUS. T. DB 
Chlorophane 

GUILLEMIN, J. 
Pholerite 

GUI9CARDI, G. 
Guarinite 

GUMBEL, C. W. vow 

Euosmite 
Winebergite 

GUYARD, H. T. 
Sulfuricin 

HAGEMAN, G. 
Arksutite 

HAHN. H. 
Carmenite 

HAIDINGER, W. 

Allemoutite 

Altaite 

Anageuite 

Ankerite 

Antimonite 

Arcanite 

Argencite 

Arsenite 

Bastite 

Berthierite 

Bieberite 

Boruite 

Botryogen 

Braunite 

Breithauptite 

BreuDiierite 



Bromite 

Cerusfdte 

Chromite 

Coccinite 

Cuprite 

Dillnite 

Domeykite 

Doppferite 

Edi.gtonite 

Eliasite 

Erinite 

Felsobanyite 

Fergusonite 

Freieslebenite 

Galactite 

Gk>8larite 

Hartite 

Hauerite 

Hausmannite 

Herderite 

HcBrnesite 

Ildefonsite 

lodite 

laopyre 

Ixolyte 

Jamesonite 

Johannite 

Johnstonlte 

Kaneite 

Kenngottite 

Kerate 

Kerstenite 

Lanthanlte 

Lasurite 

Lindackerite 

Linneeite 

Liroconite 

LOUiugite 

Ldweite 

Magnetite 

Manganite 

Melancbyme 

Melangraphite 

Meroxene 

Millerite 

Mimetite 

Mirabilite 

Nagyagite 

Naumannite 

Newjanskite 

Nioblte 

Nitratlne 

Onofrite 

Partschinite 

Pateraite 

Patrinite 

Petzite 

PhcBDicite 

Piauzite 

Picrosmine 

Piddingtonite 

Plattnerite 

Plumosite 

Psilomelane 

Pyrolusite 

Rammelsbergite 

Reissacherite 

Schreibersite 

Selbite 

Shepardite 

Sisserskite 

Skutterudlte 

8tephanite 

Sternbergpite 

Stolzite 



INDEX TO AUTHORS 



307 



HAIDINOER {continued) 

Suttanite 

Tetradymite 

Teti-abediite 

Tlifriiionatrite 

Tilkerodite 

Troilite 

Tyrollte 

Uraniiiite 

Vnlentiuite 

Vopli'te 

Walcliowite 

Wiserite 

WOlchite 

Wiilfenite 

ZincitA 

Zinnwaldite 

Zippeile 

HALL. C. W., and 
PECKHAM, S. F. 
Lintonite 

HAMBERG, A. 

(Taryopilite 

FliDkite 

Ganophyllite 

MaDKanchlorite 

Pyropbanite 

HANNAY, J. B. 

Arsenargentlte 

Ar84*notellurite 

Bowlini^te 

PI um bomanganite 

Youngite 

HARDMAN, K T. 
Hullite 

HARE, R. B. 
Leucotile 

HARKNE8S, B. 
Cottorite 

HARRINGTON, B. J. 

Cbemawinite 
DawsoDite 

HARTMANN, K. F. A. 

Hyd romanganocalcite 
Uraogreen 

HATCHETT, C, 
Retinasphalt 

HAUGHTON, 8. 

Hislopite 
Hunterite 

HAU8M ANN, J. F. L. 
AntboBiderite 
Apyrite 
Biotite 
Botryolite 
Callocbrome 
Cashiterotantalite 
Chrome ochre 
Copaline 
CrocidoUte 
Elaterito 
Esmarkite 
Fluocerine 
GJaserite 



Glaiicophane 

HaBniatoconite 

Hyalomelaii 

Hydroborocalcite 

HydrocoDite 

Hydrohalire 

Hydrophilite 

Iron 8par 

KalkiiiaKnesite 

Karstenite 

Lfpidoinelane 

LimoDiie 

Nickel bloom 

Olifconite 

IVntaclaKite 

Phannacochalcite 

Pbarmacosiderite 

PIcrolite 

PItticite 

Polychrome 

Polyxen 

Pneitdi ^malachite 

Pyroniomhite 

I^rogmalite 

Rhodochrofiite 

Ruby mica 

Schulzite 

Sericolite 

SiUerocoDlte 

Siderotaiitalite 

Siiiopite 

Siimragdochalite 

Sphserosiderite 

Stypticite 

Tetraclasite 

Triclaitite 

Triplite 

White copper 

HAUSMANN, J. F. L., and 
8TR0MEYER, F. 

Antimonial nickel 

HAUY, R. J. 

Actinote 

Amphibole 

Amphigene 

Analcite 

Anatatie 

Anthracite 

Antimonial ailYer 

Aplome 

A|)ophylIite 

Apotome 

Arsenical iron 

Arsenical nickel 

Axinire 

Cyniophane 

DiaIlaK<» 

Diaspore 

Dioptase 

Dipyre 

Disthene 

Epidote 

Essonite 

Eudase 

Grammatite 

Green diallage 

Harmotome 

Hypersthene 

Idocrase 

Made 

Meionite 

Mesotype 

Metall«ada] diallage 



Nephelite 

Olieiste 

OrMinoe 

Piirantbine 

1 leonaste 

Pycnite 

P> roxene 

Re^iiiite 

Sphfne 

Spin there 

Siaurotide 

Srilbite 

TelfRia 

Triphane 

Zinc spinel 

HAWES, G. W. 
Diabantite 

HAYDEN, H. H. 
Necroiiite 

HAYES, A. A, 

Danaittf 

Magnesian alum 
PickerinKite 

HEADDEN, W. P. 

Oriphite 
Kehoeite 

HECTOR, J. 
Taranakite 

HEDDLE, M. F. 

Abriachanite 

Avaite 

Balvraidite 

Bhreckite 

Bogoslovskite 

CIouHionite 

CraifTtonite 

Dudgeonite 

Ellon ite 

Farglte 

Faroelite 

Forchhammerite 

Haughlonite 

Hibbertite 

Hydronlumbite 

Igelptromite 

OToiocochite 

Pilolite 

Plunibonacrite 

Rocksilk 

Rubislite 

Tol>ermorfte 

Totaigite 

Tvreeite 

Uigiie 

Wu^kerite 

Xantholite 

HEINRICH, O. J. 
Carbonite 

HELM. O. 

Gedanite 

GieKsite 

Rtlmaiiite 

HELM and CONWENTZ 
See Con WBNTZ and H klm 



INDEX TO AUTHORS 



HERHANN, R F. J. T 
HERMANN. R. 



AiMnlcsinWr 
Auerbacblle 



H6l*TOmerlte 

Kjiirochlore 

inte 

KareliDlte 

Kupfeiiw 

Lanlhanocerlle 

Maiig«n^imph[bole 

Monultuid 
PBDiiirs 

Phonphnohromlie 
PhospborgummlM 



BJadw 
HEYER, J. C. E 



SolphnbalJte 
YUritffi'to"" " 

HIDDEN. W. E., and 
PEN FIELD, S. L. 
Hwnlliiita 



Cron-Btone 
FloB-ferrt 
Wliitfl arsenic 

HILLE BRAND, W. P. 



HITCHCOCK. E. 
Fasciculi M 
LiDcolDlte 



HOFEK, H. 

Ilseiiianuite 

Roglbomlte 
HOFFMANN, C. A. a 

TilB ore"'™' 
HOFMaNN E. voh 

HOLMBERG, H. J, 

D^erofte 
HOLMQUIST. P, J. 

KD^pile 
HOLST, N, O. 

HarmalTOlite 

HBtricit« 
HONEY MANN, D. 

Loulsiie 



Niireecila 
HORODEKI, 

Tllnito 
HORTON, Wm. 

See FtHCB. BoRTOH aitf 

HOW, H. 

Ceiiti-allasiCe 

Cryptomopphlte 

Cyaoollfe 

MonlenitB 

Raphilfl 

PUicnborocakite 

Stei-iciM 

Etellariie 

Btibeiita 

WinhworthltB 
HUBBARD. L. L. 

Aior-pyrrtiito 
HUNT, T. a. 

Coniniie 

Encpladito 

Haoii'llee 

Eeramita 

I«BaniHi 



IlfDEX TO AUTHORS 



309 



HUNT icontinwdj 
Lyncurite 
Parophite 
Venerite 
VVilsonite 

HUOT, J. J. N. 
BaKma^ite 
Bavalite 
Blatterine 
Broufcnartixi 
Calciiiitre 
CocoDucite 
iKlesiasite 
KapnikJte 
Luf^oniie 
Lampadite 
Mugnesinitre 
Ouatite 
PeAJllite 
Pfafflte 
Prziltramite 
RoRite 
Baldanite 
SavcKilnskite 
Sideroborine 
Hiderochrome 
VarffMite 
Wtfbrlite 
Wolfisbergite 

HU8SAK, E. 
Brazilite 

HUS8AK, E., and 
PRIOR, G. T. 
Zirkelite 

IGEL8TR0M. L. J. 
Amphithalite 
Antiiocbroite 
Arsetiiopleite 
Aftbeferrite 
Asteroite 
Basiliite 
Cataspilite 
Chloroareeniaii 
Cbondrarsenite 
Chondrofitibiaii 
Ekmanite 
ElfRtftroite 
EmphoHte 
Epiphanire 
Ferrostibian 
Hemaflbrite 
Hematolite 
Hematostibiite 
Hillanf^ire 
Hydrotephroite 
Lamprophanite 
Lamprostibian 
Lindesite 

MafpnetoRtlbiaD 

Manfranbrucite 

Mang:aDnphylllte 

Mangranofltibiite 

MelanostiblaD 

Monimolite 

Npoffwite 

Pafsber^te 

Persbendte 

Pleonectite 

Pleurasife 

Plumbof»Trlte 

Polyarsenite 

Fyrbaurite 






Pyrochroite 

PyrrhoaraeDite 

RnudoareeDian 

SJOfcrofvlte 

Stibiatil 

Stratopeite 

Svaiibergite 

TalktripTlte 

Xanthoarsenite 

IN08TRANZEFF, A. VOH 
Schungite 

IVANOFF, . 

Kalipblte 

JACKSON, C. T. 
Catliiiite 
Chloroph.vUite 
Ledererite 
Masonite 

JACKSON and ALGER 

See A LOCK and 
Jackson 

JACKSON, C. T., and 
WHITNEY. J. D. 

Cblorastrolite 
JAHN. K. 

See BbnkO and Jahn 
JAMESON. R. 

Acicular hiRtunth 
Antimonial lead ore 
Anriniony blende 
Antimony j^iance 
Antimony ochre 
Azurite 
Bournonite 

Columbite 

Copper emerald 

Cupreous bismuth 

Foaminii^ earth 

Grav antimony 

Indivisible quarts 

Iron froth 

Iron f^liince 

Iron mica 

Mineral charcoal 

Olivenite 

Red zinc ore 

Silver f^lance 

JASCHE, C. F. 

AllafTite 
Diaio^ite 
Diaphorite 
Rhodonite 

JEFFERI8. W. W. 
Painterite 

JENZSCH, G. 

Chlorophanerite 
Vestan 

Wei88i);ite 

JOHN. J. F. 
BlcBdite 
liOnzinite 
Lucullite 
RazoumofToktai 
Uranvitrioi 



JOHN, C. VOH 
Taraspite 

JOHNSON, 8. W. 
Kaoliuite 

JOHNSTON. J. F. W. 

Berengeiite 
Guvaquillite 
Middletonite 
Pisrotite 

Plumbocalcite 
JOHNSTONE, A. 

HydromuscoTite 
JONAS, J. 

Wolnyn 

JORISSEN, A. 

See FoRiR and Jorisssn 
JOSSA, A. A. 

Lepolite 

JUUEN, A. A. 

A^laite 
Metabrushite 
Onlthiie 
ZeuKite 

KAMMERER, A. A. 

Wolchonskoite 
KOROVAEFF. Th. 

Kischtim -parislte 

KARSTEN, C. J. B. 
Ifartinsite 
Vignite 

KARSTEN. D. L. G. 

Aluminite 

Aphrite 

Arendalite 

Arsenic bloom 

Ban-tes 

Blefniere 

Bronzlte 

Chiastollte 

OoUyrite 

Colophonlte 

Copper mica 

Corneous lead 

Grammite 

Ourhoflan 
Hepatite 

Horn lead 

Jasp-opal 

Liver opal 

I/rthrodes 

Biangronese glanee 

Bfascajimite 

Nifirrine 

Pharmacollte 

Pimelite 

Pinite 

Pitchy Iron ere 

Rcussin 

Sassolite 

Schatzfte 

Scorza 

Sphragidlte 

velve* copper ore 

Zinc bloom 



310 



INDEX TO AUTHORS 



KEATING, W H. 
Dysluite 

KEATING. W. H., and 
VANUXEN, L. 

JeffersoDite 

KEFERSTEIN. Ch 
Glauconite 

KELLER. H F. 
Lillianite 

KENNQOTT, A. 

Acanthite 

CumenKite 

Dnnnemorite 

Emplectite 

Enstatir^ 

Eiikamptite 

Fleldite 

Forbesite 

Freiberg! te 

Grtinerir^^ 

Hemimorphite 

Hermannit« 

HesseDbeivite 

Hvdrozincite 

Josfiiie 

Kapiiicite 

Kremersite 

Kilarite 

Monheimite 

MttseniU) 

Naphthadil 

Nordeoskidldite 

Piedmontite 

Pilsenite 

Pisanite 

Psendophite 

Pyropissite 

Richmondite 

S&tersbereite 

Scbapbachite 

Schwatzite 

StirliDgite 

Stolpeuite 

Texasite 

Vorhauserite 

Wiserioe 

Wittichenite 

KERNDT, C. H. T. 
Muromontite 

KERSTEN, C. M. 
Bismuth cobalt 

KEYSER. G. E. 
Phonite 

KIMBALL, J. P. 
Cristo-grabamlte 

KING, C. 
Thinolite 

KIR WAN, R. 
Aetiiiolite 
Ailamantioe spar 
Aiiiianthinite 
AutimoDial ochre 
Argentine 
Arragoii spar 
Asbestiiiite 
Asbestoid 



BaroHte 

Baroseleiiite 

Bar> tocalcite 

Com pound spat 

Edeltte 

Ferricalcite 

l^lepatic pyrites 

Keffekill 

Hicarelle 

Muricalcite 

Olive copper ore 

Phosphohte 

Phosphorite 

Purple copper 

Rubellite 

Saturnite 

Siderocalcite 

Talcite 

KLAPROTH, M. H. 

AKalniatolite 

A rsenic siivei 

Bitter 8par 

Blue feldspar 

Blue ironstone 

Cnrerite 

Ctirvsoprase earth 

Cimolite 

ElsBoiiie 

Featheralum 

Figure stone 

Fire opal 

Gadolinite 

Greeoiandite 

Lazulite 

Lepidolite 

Miemite 

Natfoiite 

Nosite 

Ochroite 

Rhomb spar 

Bcborlite 

Tiianite 

Uranochre 

KLETZIN8KY, W. 
Tincalzite 

KLOCKMANN,F. 
Uraangite 

KLOOS. J.H. 

Marti nite 

KNOP, A. 

Dysanaiyte 

EpisphsBrite 

Glasurite 

Horbachlte 

Kopplte 

Pachuolite 

Pinitoid 

Protonontronite 

Pseudobiotite 

KNOWLTON, W. J. 

Cyrtolite 

KOBELL, F. VON 

Amoibite 

Anglarite 

Arseoxene 

At^pidolite 

Basanouieian 



Chalcanthite 

Chonlcrite 

Chrysotile 

Dianite 

Dyssoite 

Giimbellite 

Hebiouite 

Hemichalcite 

Hystatite 

Jolly te 

Kibdelophane 

Kierulfliie 

Klipsteinite 

Krt-ittnnite 

Lazurite 

Lirhionite 

Monzonite 

Nasturan 

Okenite 

Oncosine 

Pectolite 

Pyromeline 

Pyrosclerite 

Rabdiunite 

Raphanosmite 

Ripidoliie 

Say nite 

Scolopsite 

Spadaite 

Spaniolite 

Sphenoclase 

Styloiypite 

Thraulite 

Tschermakite 

'HKshermigite 

Vanadinite 

Wehilire 

Wittichite 

KOCH, A. 

Pf*eudobrookite 
Szaboite 

KOCHLIN, R. 
Laurionite 

KOENIG, G. A. 

Alatikaite 

Anomalite 

Beegerite 

Bementite 

Desaulesite 

Footeite 

Hydrotitanite 

Leidyite 

Maganoferrite 

Mazapilite 

Paraiuelaconite 

Protovermiculite 

Randite 

Tephrowillemite 

KOKSCHaROV, N. J. vol 

Bagrationite 

llmenorutiie 

KoiKchubeite 

Koulibmite • 

Lavroffite 

Mursinskite 

Soinionite 

Waluewite 

KOMONEN, A. 
Leuchtenbergite 



INDEX TO AUTHORS 



311 



KONINCK, L. L. de 
DaTreuzite 

KOSMANN, B. 
Lime wavellite 

KRAMBERQER, D. M. 
Pilarite 

KRANT2, A. 

Oramenite 
Melanhydrite 

KRAUS. E. 
Koenleinite 

KRAU8E. O. 
Reichardtite 

KRENNER. J. A. 

Andorite 

AvaMte 

Bunsenin 

Do^iiacskaice 

Koriielite 

Semseyite 

KUH, J. C. F. 
Hydrosilicite 

KUHN, O. B. 
Berzeliite 

KUPFFER, A. T. 
Ilmenite 

KUSCHEL, J. 
Oiumte 

KUTOROA. a 
Ivaarite 

LACAVA, 

Reflkite 

LACROIX, A. 

Fouquelte 
Michel -levy te 
Morinite 

LAIST. A., and 
KORTON, T. H. 

Horsfordite 

LAMPADIUS, W. A. 
Cupreous roanganeee 

LANDERER, X. 
Prasochronie 

LARIVIERE. B. 
Zeasite 

LASAULX, A. TON 

A^rinite 

I'Hiobromlte 

Mangandisthene 

Ma Qganidocrase 

Melanophloglte 

Pilinite 

8ieK^)urgite 

Titanomorphlte 



LASAULX and BETTEN- 
DORK 

See liKTTKNOROF aod 
Lasaulx 

LASIU8,jQ. S. O. 
Cubic quartz 

LASPEYRE8, H. 

Calvonif^riie 

Hyerophilite 

Kullilite 

Maxite 

Polydymite 

SycliDodymite 

LAUGIER, A. 
Cantalite 

LaUMONT, G DB 
PI umboKummite 

LAURENT, A. 
Wicbtisite 

LEA, L 

Cassinite 

Delawarite 

Lennilite 

Lesleyite 

Pattersonite 

LEBOUR, Q. A. 
Jarrowite 

Lk CONTE, J. L. 
Coracite 

LEED8. A. R. 
»allite 
Stevensite 

LEFORT, J. 
Bourboulite 

LEHMANN, J. 

Ettringite 
Wollaatonite 

LEUEVRE, C. H. 

Yenlte 

LEMBERG, J. 
Kalkcancrinite 

LENZ. J. G. 
Cube ore 
Fuscite 
Gallitzenite 
Galliziiiite 
Gdtbite 
8iciliauite 

LEON. M. V. DB 
Ramirite 

LEONflARD, K. C. ▼OH 
Antimony bloom 
Bromrniartine 
Gismondine 
Hair zeolite 
Illuderite 
Osmium-iridlum 
Scheelite 
Walmstedtite 

LERMINA, C. 
Slberite 



LETTSOM, W. G. 

Rhabdophanite 
LETTSOM and GREG 

See Grbo and Lbttsom 

LfiVY, A. 

.Babin{?tonite 
Beaunioniite 
Beudantite 
Brochantite 
Brookite 
Bucklandite 
Forsterite 
HerKchelite 
liuniboldtite 
Koenigite 
Mohsite 
Pbillipsite 
Roselite 
Turner! t© 
Willemite 

LEWIS. H. C. 

Cacoclaslte 

Erilite 

Hrdrobiotite 

Nitrobarite 

Philadelpite 

Phytocolllte 

Siderophyllite 

LEYMERIE, A. 

Akeiite 

BromarRryrite 

Cobaltide 

Delis! ite 

Fucherite 

Harmophane 

lodargyrite 

MofTraaite 

Prixlte 

Raucierlte 

Veronit© 

UEBE, K. T. 

Beyrichite 
Diabantachronnyn 

LIEBENER, L. 

Brandisite 
Pregrattite 

UEBIG. J. YON 
ThierHchite 

LINCK, G. 

Bilckingite 
Quenstedtite 

UNDGREN, V. 
Pseudoberzell ite 

UNDSTROM, G. 
Blomstrandite 
Elpidite 
Melanotekite 

UNK, H. F. 
Maranite 
Pheogite 

UST, K. 

Metaehloiite 
Sericite 



312 



INDEX TO AUTHORS 



UVERSIDOE, A. 

Marshite 
Noumeite 

LOEW, O. 
Wheelerite 

LOMONOSSOV, VON 

Vietinghoflte 

LORENZEN. J. 

Kaersutite 

KornerupiD 

PolvlithioDite 

Rinkite 

Steenstnipine 

L08AN1TSCU, 8. M. 
Avalite 

LOVELL, R, 
Malachite 

LOWE. A. 
Oersdorfflte 

LUCA, J. DB 
Mossottite 

LUCAS, J. A. H. 
Cordierite 

LUCCHETTI, P. 
Bergamaskite 

LUCK, E. 
Bog butter 

LUDWIG, C. F. 
Vulpinite 

LUEDECKE, O. 
Heintzite 
Heldburgite 

LUNDSTROM, C. H. 
Caryinite 

LUNDSTROM, C H., and 

SJOGREN, A. 
Barysilite 

LUZI, W. 
Graphitite 

MACADAM. W. I. 
Bruiachite 

MACCULLOCH, J. 
Cblorophjeite 
Konilite 

MAC GHIE. T B. 
See Clark aod 
Mac Ghie 

MAC IVOR, R W E. 
Dittmarite 
BlUllerite 

MACKINTOSH, J. B. 
Ferroiiatrite 

MACKINTOSH and 
HIDDEN 
See HiDDRN and 
Mackintosh 



MALLARD, E. 

Bravai8ite 

Lus8atite 

Pseudotridymiie- 

MALLARD and 
CUMENGE 

See CuMKNOE and 

MAI.IJkRD 

MALLET, F. R. 
Jaipurite 

MALLET, J. W. 

Achrematite 

Barcenite 

Byerlte 

Scleretinite 

Sipylite 

MANTOVANI, P. 
Spangrite 

MARAVIQNA. C. 
Beffanite 

MARCHAND, E. 
Passyite 

MARIQNAC, J. C. 
Liebenerile 

MARKOWNIKOW, B. 
Dihydro-thenardite 

MARX, C. 
058ite 

MASKELYNE, N. S. 

Andrawsite 

Asmanite 

Langite 

Liskeardite 

Lyellite 

Oldbamite 

Osbornite 

Waringtonite 

MASKELYNE and FIELD 
See Field and 
Maskelyne 

MASKELYNE and 
FLIGHT 
See Flighi and 

MA8KELYN& 

MATHER, W. W. 

See Finch, Horton and 
Mather 

MaUDUYT, 

Montmorillonite 

Ma WE, J. 

Brazilianite 
Valentianite 

MEDICI-SPADA, L. DI 
Musite 
Parisite 

MEILLET. A. 

Apateh'te 
Steargillite 



BIELVILLE, W. H. 

Josephinite 
Powellite 

M^E, Oh. 
Fournetite 

MENEGHINI, J. 
Dinite 

MENEGHINI and BECHI 
See Bbcbi and 

MENKOHUa 

MENIL, A. P. J. DU 
Manganjasper 

MEUNIER, S. 

Agramite 

Arvalte 

Beiidegite 

Burlingtonite 

CaUlite 

Campbellite 

Carltonite 

Catarinite 

Coahuilite 

Dicksonite 

leknite 

Jewelite 

Kendalhte 

Lenartite 

Lockportite 

Madocite 

NelRonite 

Rocite 

Schwetzite 

TazewelUte 

Thundite 

Tuczoiiite 

Victorite 

MEYER, 

Thomaite 

MICHAELSON, J. A. 
Schefferite 

MICHEL, L. 
Hautefeuillite 

MICHEL-LEVY, A., and 
MUNIER-CHALMAS 
Lutecite 
Quart ziiie 

MIERISCH, B. 

Kaliophilite 
MIERS, H. A. 

Sangiiinite 

MILCH, L. 

Hintzeite 
Lossenite 

MILL, N. 
Davite 

MILLER, W. H. 

See Brooke and Millkr 



INDEX TO AUTHORS 



313 



MITSCHERUCH, A. 
Lfiwigite 

M0H8, F. 

Azure spar 
Dystome-spar 
Euchlore-mica 
Garnei bleude 
Qlance blende 
Hplan -glance 
Needle ore 
Pearl mica 
Purple blende 
Ruby blende 

MOLL, C. E. F. VON 

Anthraconite 

DeTonite 

Freiesleben 

Oahnite 

8iderite 

MONNET, A. G. 
Lead vitriol 

MONRO Y, P. L. 
Tapalpite 

MONTICELLI, T. 

See CovBLLi and Mon- 

TICBLLI 

MOORE, G. E. 

Brushite 
Chalcophanite 
Hetsrolite 
Metacinnabarite 

MORRIS, G. 0. 
Coorongite 

MOSER, K. 
Pelagodte 

MOSES, A. J., and 
WALLER, E. 

Nickel-skuttenidite 

MUCK, T. 

Pandermlte 
Sulfatallophane 

MUHLENBERG, N. H. 
Endlicbite 

MUNIER-CHALMA8, 

See Michkl-Lbtt and 
M umibr-Chalm A8 

MUTHMANN, W. 
Meraellte 

NAPIONE, C. A. G. 

Ercinito 
Pasrodite 

NAUMANN, C. F. 

Delejisite 
Glockerite 
Nipholite 
Faasaulte 



Smeg^matlte 

Talcoid 

Tiemannite 

NAVIA, 8. 

See Fkrnardez and 
Navia 

NAWRATIL, A. 
Helenite 

NECKER, L. A. 

Hydrotalc 
Stannolite 

NESSLER^J. 

See Fischer and 
Nbsblbr 

NICOL, J. 

Aciculite 

Grttnauite 

Modumite 

Redruthite 

Syepoorite 

Tellurite 

NIES, A. 

Eleonorite 

PIcite 

Streu^te 

NOETLING, F. 
Burniite 

NOGGERATH, J. 

Eliren()erglte 
Karstin 

NOLLNER, C. 
LUneburgite 

NORDENSKIOLD, A. E. 

Ainalite 

Arrhenite 

Atopite 

Brandtite 

Cenosite 

Cleveite 

Crookesite 

Cryoconite 

Ecdemite 

Ersbyite 

Ganomalite 

Hamartite 

Hielmite 

Hyalotekite 

Hydrocerusgite 

Hydroeamarskite 

Ixiolite 

Kletyolte 

Laxmannite 

Mangantantalite 

Nohlite 

SkoRb51ite 

Tapiolite 

ThaumaAitA 

Thermophyllite 

Yttrogummlto 

NORDENSKIOLD, G. 
Pbolldolite 



NORDENSKIOLD, N. 

Adelpbolite 

Alexandrite 

Ampbodelite 

Buusite 

Cbazflilte 

Demantoid 

Demidoffite 

Diphaoite 

Ellagite 

Fnigardite 

Gilleb&ckite 

Jevreiiiovlte 

Jogynaite 

K&tnmererite 

Karaiiihinite 

Kokscliarofflte 

Lazurapatite 

Lazurfeldspar 

Lindsayite 

Martourite 

Neotocite 

Paralogite 

PerowBkyn 

Pbenache 

PseudoscapoUte 

Pyrallollte 

Pyrargillite 

Romanzovite 

Sordavalite 

Sundvicite 

Wittingite 

Xenolite 

ZermatUte 

NORMAN, 

Pastreite 

NORTON, T. H. 

See Laist and Nortoh 

NOSE, K. W. 

D^niln 
Sanidine 
Saphirine 
Spinellane 
Spinel line 

NXTTTALL, T. 

Cleiopbane 
Maclurite 
Magne^ian marble 
Marmolite 
Nemalite 

OCHSENIUS, C. 
Bischoflte 

OFF. HU8SKIN, and 
RICHMOND, H. D. 

Masrite 

OHSSON, C. D' 
Chondrodite 

OPPEL. A. 

Se«> Gronivokn and 
Oppel 

ORTLIER, J. 
CIplyte 

OSANN. A. 
Dietzeite 



814 



INDEX TO AUTHORS 



OUCHAKOFF, A. 
Pelicanite 

OWEX. D. D. 
Thalite 

PAIJKULU 8. & 

Eucrasite 

Homilite 

Raitite 

PAILLETTE, A., and 
SCHULZ, W. 

Ballesteroslte 

PALLAS, P. 8. 

Marekanite 

PATRIN, E. L. M. 
Brass ore 

PAULINYI. A. 
Pettkoite 

PEALE, A. C. 
Blackmorite 

PEARSE, J. B. 
OrastitH 

PECKHAM, 8. F. 

See Hall and Pbckham 

PEITHNER, J. T. A. 
Porcellanite 

PENFIELD, 8. L. 

Canfieldite 
SpanfiTolite 

PENFIELD, 8. L., and 
WELLS, H. L. 

Oerhardtite 

PENFIELD and BRUSH 

See Brush and 
Pbnfield 

PENFIELD and QENTH 
See Gbnth and 

PSNPIBLD 

PENFIELD and HIDDEN 
See Hidden and 

PSNFIELD 

PERCY, J. 
Lettsomite 

PERRY, N. W. 
Ramosite 

PERRY and CLARKE 
See Clarke and Pbrbt 

PETERS, K. F. 
Bihnrite 
Szaibelyite 

PETERSEN, T. 
Chroinpicotite 
Coeruleolactite 
Ouadaleazarite 
Sti i )iohexargen tite 
Stibiotriargentite 



PETERSEN and BRAUN8 

See Brauns and 
Pbtbrsbn 

PETERSEN. T., and 
SANDBERGER, F. von 

Klaprothite 

PETZHOLDT, G. P. A . 
Predazzite 

PFAFF. C. H. 
Nickel glance 

PHILLIPS, R. 
Varvicite 

PHILLIPS, Wm 
Condurrite 
March isonite 
Seveiite 

PHILLIPS, R. and 
PHILLIPS, WM. 
Tennaiitite 

PHIPSON, T. L. 

Sombrerite 

PICHLER, A. 
Zirlite 

PICOT DB LA PEYROU8E 
Koupholite 

PIDDINGTON, H. 
Calderite 
Hircite 
Nepaulite 
Newboldite 
Tremenheerite 

PINI, E. 
Adnlaria 
TremoUte 

PIPPING. K. 
lochroite 

PI8ANI, F. 
Dfvilllne 
Dewalquite 
Kalicine 
Kongsbei^te 

PLANER, 

Knaufflte 

PLATANIA, G. 
Xiphonite 

PLATTNER, K.X 

See Breithaupt and 
Plattner 

PUNY 

Asbestos 

Asteria 

Basanite 

Callais 

Dragonite 

Jaspagate 

Lydiaii stone 

Maltha 

Misy 

Morion 

Obsidian 

Ophite 

Sory 



PODA VON NEUHATTSt N. 
Muriacite 

POPP, O. 
Cerbolite 

PRATT, N. A. 
Caiitonite 

PRECHT, H. 
Douglas! te 
Krugito 

PROST, E. 
Salmite 

PROUST, J. L. 

Antimonial red silyer 

PURNELL, S. 
lonite 

PUSIREWSKY, P. 
Nefediefflte 

RADOMINSKI, F. 
Kararfveite 

RADOSZKOSKI, O. 
Wagite 

RAIMONDL A. 
Arequiplte 
Coroiiguite 
Cuprocalcite 
DUrffUltite 
lluanttijayite 
Malinowskite 
Plumbofttannite 
Sideronatrite 
Tarapacaite 
Wertheiiianite 

RAMMEI^BERQ, C. F. 
Antimonial arsenic 
Castillite 
Chiviatite 
Chlorapatite 
Crednerite 
Cuprodescloizite 
Epichiorite 
Fluorapatite 
Qinilsite 
Ootthardite 
Het«*ronioi*phite 
Hjdromagnocalcite 
Iron alum 
Majfnoferrite 
Pseudolil>ethenite 
Sigterire 
Tachydrite 
Wald'heimite 
Xonotlite 

RAMONDINI. V. 
Zurlite 

RAND, T. D. 
Ivigtite 

RANSOME. F. L. 
Lawsonite 

RATH, G. voM 
Amblystegite 
Chalcomorphite 
Cristobalite 
Fiedlerite 



INDEX TO AUTHORS 



316 



TOM RATH {continued) 


RISSE, H. 


Foresite 


Moresnetite 


Haimayite 




Jordanite 


RIVERO, M. DB 


Krennerite 


Humboldtine 


Marialite 




Newberyite 


ROBB, J. 


Tridymite 


Albertite 


VOM RATH and DAMOUR 


RCEPPER, W. T. 


See Dahour and 


Hydrofranklinite 


VOM Rath 


Sauconite 


RAZOUMOFFSKI, Q. VON 


ROMANOFSKI, H. voN 


Nertschinskite 


Glinkite 


Protheite 


ROSCOE, H. E. 


READ WIN, T. A. 


Mottramite 


Adipocerite 
Allochite 


ROSfi, a. 


Chanaralite 


Anorthite 


Dipyrite 
Hydrocinite 


Astrakanite 


Barsowite 


Szaskaite 


Cancrinlte 


RFJCHARDT. B. 


Chloritoid 

Chlorospioel 

Epistilbite 


Kieserite 


Leopoldite 
Sch&tzeUite 


Men^te 


Perofskite 


Schoenite 


Plagionite 


RFJCHENBACH, K. VON 


Pyrrhite 
Rliabdite 


Kamacite 


Rhodizite 


Lamprite 


Rhyacolite 


Plessite 


Stassfurtite 


Taenite 


Telluric silver 


RFJNSCH, P. F. 


Tscheffkinite 
Uralite 


Cyprusite 
RENOVANZ, H. M. 


XanthophylUte 
Zinkenite 


BaikaUte 


ROSti, H. 




Camallite 


RENWICK, J. 


Copiapite 
Fibroferrite 


Torrelite 


RETZIUS, A. J. 


Miargyrite 
Polybasite 


Conite 


Samai-skite 


Edelforsite 


Uranoniobite 




Uranotantalite 


REUSS, A. E. 




Lillite 


ROSS, W. A. 




Meerschaluminlte 


REUSS, F. A. 




Anthracozenite 


ROSTER, a. 


Foliated tellurium 

"IT ->1^ 


Picroallumogene 


Lydite 
Opal jasper 


ROTH, F. 




Pencatite 


REYNOLDS, J. E. 




Franklandite 


ROWNEY, T. H. 


RICHMOND. H. D. 


Hjrpozanthite 


See Off and Richmond 


RUMPF, J. 




Kaluszite 


RICHTER. a. F. 




Peloconite 


SACH, 


RIO, A. M. DEL 


Elhuyarite 


Herrerite 


SAGE, B. a. 


RiorrE, E. N. 


Blue talc 


Hfibnerite 


RAT.VETAT, L. A. 


Stetefeldtite 


Randaunite 



SANDBERGER, F. voN 

Aphrosiderite 

Carmine-spar 

Clarite 

Clinopheeite 

Collophanite 

Epigenite 

Glaucopj^rite 

Heubachite 

Isoclasite 

Lepidomorphite 

Leucochalcite 

Leucomangranite 

MetaloDchidite 

Metanocerite 

Metasericite 

Oncophyllite 

Plenargyrite 

Polyargyrite 

Protolithionlte 

Spathiopyrite 

wolfachite 

SANTI, G. 

Amiatite 
Pearl sinter 

SAUER, A. 

Graphitoid 
Kryptotll 
Prismatine 
Riebeekite 

SAUSSURE, H. B. DB 

Bvssolite 

Chusite 

Delphinite 

Dolomite 

Grenatite 

Limbilite 

Menilite 

Octahedrite 

Sairenite 

Sideroclepte 

Smaragdite 

Staurobarite 

SAUSSURE. N. T. DB 

Sappare 
Saussurite 

SAVCHENKOV, T. VON 
Paligorskite 

SAVI. P. 

Branchite 
Caporcianite 

SCACCHI, A. 

Atelite 

Belonesite 

Chloralluminite 

Chlorocalcite 

Chloromagnesite 

Chlorothionite 

Cryptohalite 

Cupromagnesite 

Cuspidine 

Cyanochrome 

Dimorphite 

Dolerophanite 

Erioehalcite 

Erythrosiderlte 

Fluosiderite {over) 



INDEX TO AUTSOSS 



FKUdOO 

PyrotAChntts 

RapbiitderiM 

VeBbine 

Toltalle 
8CACCH1,K. 

Buohlotile 

HvdroglobsrtUe 

LUhldlODlte 

Fbacalllte 
SOAC^|L A., and 



LCCm. ^ 



80A( 
CrTpUollte 
SOHAFHJLUTL, C. S. 

AmpbllDKlta 
EHdTmlta 

Hu-garodlte 

F&raxanlCe 



SCHEELE, K. W, 

iSCHEIBE. R. 

Haucheooraite 
■SCHERREH <C. J. A.J Tl 

AhnuIoUCs 

Aitropbymte 

EacbeiiW 



HeUDopb&ne 
HeoIlM 
Olaflte 
OIlKoclase^Iblte 



Taberslta 
TrsTerwIUM 
Wtthlerlle 
Yttcotitauita 



BCHLFXIEUIILCH, A 



8CHHID, E. E. 
HIcro-KbOrflM 
UlcroTernilcuUW 



See CuRKE BDd 

SCHNEIDEEt, K. 

Oold amalgMii 

8CHONBEIN, C. F. 



Eooptalla 
Eosiifl 

IblBlte 
SelnjMte 

Ulcropbjllile 
Mlcroplulte 
Hiiita 



BlUclophlte 
BltnlaTM 
BtQUtte 
DnuathBlllM 
Yeuelyite 
ICHROCKINQEB, J. \ 
Dlairlohlte 
Hucklle 
Neudorate 



SCHWARZEHBERG, - 



8KLB, C. J. 

BlUDUCb sUi 



Teoortts 
BEHUONS, W. 

BETTERBEBO, J. 

Kobelllte 
BBVERaiN, BASIL 

WUulte 
SETBERT, A 



Apbtbtlaltts 
Aquae repHte 

Blphospbammlto 
BlBmutbaurile 

CBldmaiiKlU 

OlcoElncTte 

ColBlronbarite 

CalyplolKe 

Cbalcodlts 

CbalyplM 

Chat^iamtte 

Cberolrina 

Chladuite 



EpIeTaDbfl 



Ferrocotumblt' 



INDEX TO AUTHORS 



817 



8HEPARD ictmtinued) 
Qlossecolite 
GoHhenite 
Qrapbltoid 
Guanapite 
Ouanozalite 
Hndiluniite 
Hagemannite 
Harrisite 
Herman nolite 
Hitchcockice 
Hou|2:hite 
Howard ite 
Humoferrite 
Hydroniccite 

Hj-dronickelnuigneBite 
lodolice 

Jenkinsfte 

Kabaite 

Keatiiigine 

Kupaphrite 

Lederite 

Lepidochlore 

Leucanterite 

Leucopjrite 

LucHMtlcite 

Luo-chalybite 

Luo-dlallogite 

Luo-magneBlte 

Maraamolite 

Marcylite 

Microlite 

Monetite 

Monite 

MoroQolite 

Natrobromite 

Natrodine 

Niccochromite 

Nickel Rtibine 

NIcopyrite 

Nitrammite 

Nitrocalcite 

Nltroma^ealte 

Oktibbehite 

Olivinoid 

Ontariolite 

Ozacalcite 

Oxammite 

Ozarkite 

Palladinite 

Paracolumbite 

Parailmenite 

Parathorite 

Partachite 

Pelbamine 

Perlimonite 

Phosphammonlte 

Pjrroclasite 

PyrofTuanite 

PyroTdesfne 

Pyromelan 

Rahtite 

Rafitolyte 

Redondite 

Rutherfordite 

Sohorlomite 

Selencu price 

Solfatarite 

Sphenomite 

Stephensonite 

Sulpho-Mlenite 

Syhedrite 

Telaspyrine 

Tlncalconite 

Troostite 



Vanuzemite 

Wai'wickite 

Washingtonlte 

Williamsite 

Xanthitane 

Zircarbite 

SHEPARD, C. U., Ja. 
Fyrophosphorite 

SIBLEY, A. H. 
Macfarlanite 

SIEVEKING 

Nantokite 

8IEWERT, M. 

Manganapatite 
8ILLIMAN, B. 

TuDgstic ochre 

SILUMAN, B., Jr. 

diiigmanite 

Corundellite 

Emerald nickel 

Euphyllite 

Lancasterite 

Maripoaite 

Monrolite 

Priceite 

Samoite 

UDionite 

WoUongoDglte 

8ILVE8TRI, O. 

Siderazote 
8IMMLER, a T. 

Helvetan 

SINGER, 8. 

Piagiocitrita 
WattevlUlte 

SJOGREN, A. 

Allactite 
Diadelpbite 
Sarkinite 
Synadelphite 

SJOGREN and LUND- 
STROM. 

See LukdstrOm and 
Sjogren 

SJOGREN. A., and 
WEIBYE, P. a 

Catapleiite 

SJOGREN, Hj. 

Adelite 

Antochite 

Bjelkite 

Fredrldte 

Galenobismuttto 

Prolectite 

Retzlan 

Svabite 

Urbanite 

8KEY, W. 
Awaniite 



SMITH, J. L. 

Celestialite 

Dauhrfellte 

Emerjilte 

Epbesite 

Hatchettolite 

Hiddeiiite 

LiebifTite 

MedjidiU} 

Peckbainite 

Rogerbite 

8MITHSON, JAMES 

Electric calamine 
Vesuvian salt 

SONNEN8CHEIN, F. L. 

Carolathine 
SORET, F. J. 

Jurlnite 
STARKL, G. 

Leucophyllite 

STAUTE, H. 
Pinnoite 

8TEFFENS, H. 

Blue spar 
Ilvaite 
Kerapbyllite 
Natrosiderite 

STEIN, A. 
Staffelite 

STEINBERG, C. 
Paraluminite 

STEINHEIL, F. voir 
Pargasite 

8TEINMANN. J. 

Cacozenlte 
Cronstedtite 

8TELZNER, A. W. 

Famatinlte 
Franckette 
Webnerite 

STEPHEN, G. W. 
Barklyite 

STRENG. A. 
Protobastite 

STROMETER, P. 

Aomite 

Allopbane 

Eudiolvte 

PicropbarmaeoUtd 

Polyhalite 

Scheererite 

Selensulphur 

STROMETER and 
HAUSMANN 

See Hadsmann and 

STROiniTKR 

STROMEYER. P. 
Brericite 



318 



INDEX TO AUTHORS 



8TRUVER, J. 

Gastaldite 
SeUaiU) 

8TUBBS, C. H. 
Roseite 

STUTZ, A. 
Tabular spar 

SULZER 
Stroutianite 

SVANBEKG, L. F. 

Aphthonite 

Qttocrouite 

Groppite 

Hyurophite 

Iberite 

Picrophyll 

Piotine 

Platiniridium 

Poljargite 

Roselian 

RuseiCe 

Saponite 

8ZAB0, J. 
UrvOlgyite 

TAMM, H. 

Ferrotungsten 

TAYLOR, T. 
Killinite 

TAYLOR, W. J. 

Clayite, 
Lecontite 

TENNANT, 8. 
Iridium 

TERMIER, P. 
Leverrierite 

TESCHEMACHER. E. F. 
Guanite 

THAULOW, M. C. J. 
Boulang^erite 

THOMPSON, W. 

Fioriie 
Sarcolite 

THOMSON. M. 
See BiNNBT and 
Thomson 

THOMSON. R. D. 
Crucilite 
Scoulerite 

THOMSON, T. 
Allanite 
Antrimolite 
Baltimorire 
Boosdorffite 
Bromllte 
Bytownite 
Calcarfobarite 
Chalilite 
Cliithalite 
Davidsonite 



Doranite 

Emmotiite 

Ferrotautalite 

GUberiite 

Glottalite 

GOkumite 

Greenockite 

Gyiuuite 

Harringtonite 

Hii^hgate resin 

Hurouite 

Hydrous anthophyilite 

H vdruus iolite 

Kirwaniie 

Lehuutite 

Momite 

Morveiiite 

Mullicite 

Needle spar 

Neurulite 

Newkirkite 

Peristerite 

Perthite 

Phyllite 

Plinthite 

Polyadelphite 

Polylite 

Prasolite 

Raphilite 

Retinalite 

Rhodalite 

Santilite 

Scorilite 

SUicite 

SodaiiCe 

Stellfte 

Strelite 

Torrelite 

Tuesite 

Xanthite 

Zeuzite 

THORELD, A. F. 
Gongylite 

TIBERG, H. V. 
Spodiosite 

TICHBORNE, C. B. C. 
Kiimacooite 

TIETZE, E. 
Milanite 

TORREY, J. 

GibbRite 
Siderographite 

TOTTEN, J. G. 
Newporlite 

TOWNSON, R. 
Sarcite 

TRAILL, 8. 

Bary-strontianite 
Stromnite 

TRAILL. Wm. 
Bituraeiiite 

TRAUBE, H. 
Laubaiiite 

TREUTLER, , 

KirKhiHite I 



TRIPE, C. 
Haytorite 

TROLLE - WACHTMEIST- 
ER, H. G. 

Hvdromagnesite 

Weissite 

TROMMSDORF, J. B. 
Agustite 

TSCHERMAK, G. 

Alloclasite 

Anuniite 

Daphnite 

Dravite 

Klementite 

Ludwigite 

Maskelynite 

Mikrotine 

Bipoiiite 

Simouyite 

Trinkerite 

TURNER, E. 
Haidingerite 

ULEX, G. L. 

Boronatrocaksite 
StruYite 

ULKE, T. 

Cuprocasltterite 

ULLMANN, J. a 

Chalcosiderite 

Gyrite 

Lepidochrocite 

Pyrrhosiderlte 

Stilpnosiderite 

ULLOA, A. DB 
Platinum 

ULRICH. G. H. F. 

Maldonite 
Selwynite 
Talcusite 

UTTINPER, 

Natrocalcite 

VANUXEM, L. 

See Kbatino and 
Vanuxem 

VERNON, W. H. 
Scarbroite 

VIGENER. 

Schaffnerite 

VIVIANI, D. 
Ligurite 

VOGELSANG, H. 
Ferrir« 
Opacite 
Viridtte 

VOGL. J. F. 
Waltherite 

VOGT, J. H. L. 
Akermanite 



INDEX TO AUTH0B8 



319 



VOLGER, a. H. O. 

Helminthe 

Parasite 

Tauriscite 

VRBA, C. 
Frieseite 

WAAGE, 

Eytlandito 

WACHTMEISTER, H. G. 
TROLLE- 

See Trollb-Waoht- 

MBISTER 

WAGNER, P. 
Puschkinite 

WALCHNER, F. A. 
Hyalosiderite 

WALDIE, D. 
O'Rileyite 

WALLER, E. 

See Moses and 
Waller 

WALLERIUS, J. G. 

Alumstone 
Feldspar 
Foliated zeolite 
Green lead ore 
Horn silver 
Lapis ollaris 
Lardite 
Lithoxyl 
Mountain blue 
Mountain cork 
Potstone 
Pseudogalena 
Red lead ore 
Schorl 
Selenite 
Specular iron 
Tripolite 
Vitreous silver 
White feldspar 
White silver ore 
White vitrol 
wolframite 

WALMSTEDT, L. P. 
Edelite 

WALTER8HAUSEN. 
W. S. V. 

Arsenomelan 

Carphnstilbite 

Cyclopite 

Hyalnphane 

Hyblite 

Hvdrosilicite 

Korite 

Notite 

Palagronite 

Parastilbite 

Scleroclase 

Sideromelane 

Siderosilidte 

Trinacrite 

Xylooblore 



WATTS, H. 
Phosphocerite 

WEBB, T. H. 
Vermiculite. 

WEBSKY, M. 

AUophite 

Caracolite 

Eichwaldite 

Epiboulangerite 

Grochauite 

JuUanite 

Kochelite 

Sarcopside 

Urauophane 

WEBSKY and BECKER 

See Becker and Web- 
sky 

WEBSTER, J. W. 
Michaelite 

WEIBULL,M. 

Manganhedenbergite 

Manganhisingerite 

Silfbergite 

WEtBYE, P. 0. 

Aspidelite 
Eudnophite 
Polychroilite 
TachyaphalUte 

WEIBYE. P. C, and 
BERLIN, N. J. 

See Berlin and 
Wbibte 

WEIBYE, P. C, and 

SJOGREN, A. 

See Sjogren and 
Weibye 

WEINSCHENCK, E. 
Cohenite 

WEISBAOH, A. 

Argyrodite 

Argyropyrite 

Arnimite 

Bismutosphaerite 

Chlorargyrite 

Chrysitin 

Cuprobinnite 

Flutherite 

Kolosorukite 

LepidophsBite 

Leukargyrite 

Lillhammerite 

Mod u mite 

Natrite 

Natronitrite 

Phimbobinnite 

Rhagite 

SphsBrocobaltite 

TrOgerite 

Uranocircite 

Uranopilite 

Uranosphsrite 



Uranospinite 
Vogesite 
Walpurgite 
Zeunerite 

WEISBACH, A., and 

wmCKLEB, C. 
Luzonite 

WEISS, C. S. 
Cuboizite 

WEISS, E. 
Subdelessite 

WELLS, H. L. 
Sperrylite 

WELLS and DANA 
See Dana and Wells 

WELLS and PENFIELD 

See Pbnpield and 
Wells 

WERNEKINCK, F. C. G. 
Sideroschisolite 

WERNER, A. G. 

Albine 

Anhydrite 

Apatite 

Aragonite 

Arcticite 

Arsenical bismuth 

Asparagus stone 

Augite 

Axe stone 

Bismuth ochre 

Black lead ore 

Boracite 

Calamite 

Carin thine 

Carpholite 

Celestite 

Chalcolite 

Chlorite 

Cinnamon stone 

Copper froth 

Cube spar 

Cubizite 

Cyanite 

Dark red silver ore 

Egeran 

Fassaite 

Fish-eye stone 

Glance coal 

Graphite 

Grossular 

Hair pyrites 

Hair salt 

Heavy spar 

Helvite 

Hollow spar 

Honey stone 

Hyalite 

Ice spar 

lolite 

Iron sinter 

Iserite 

Labrador-hornblende 

Labrador! te 

Laumontite {.over) 



320 



INDEX TO AUTHOBS 



WERNER {continued) 

Leucite 

Lievriie 

Magnetic pyrites 

Manganbleude 

MaiiKanese spar 

Mealy zeolite 

Melanite 

Mountain butter 

Mountain soap 

Needlestone 

Needle aseolite 

Nephrite 

Olivine 

Omphacite 

Paulite 

Peliom 

Physalite 

Pistacite 

Pitch coal 

Porcelain jasper 

Prehnite 

Pyreneite 

Irrope 

Radiated pyrites 

Radiated leoUte 

Rhffitizite 

Rutile 

Semiopal 

Spear pyrites 

TnumersUme 

Tin pyrites 

Torbemite 

Uranmica 

VesuTianite 

ViTianite 

Witherite 

Wood opal 

Tellow lead ore 

Zoisite 

WETHERELL, C. M. 
Melanasphalt 

WHEELER, H. A. 
Ferrogoslarite 



WHITNEY. J. D. 


WOULFE, P. 


CuproBcheelite 


Horn mercuiy 


Ferrotitanite 




Jacksonite 


WtJNSCH, A. F. 


WHITNEY andJAOKRON 


Hesite 


See Jackson and 




WHinnET 


WuktZ, H. 




Animikite 


WIBEL, F. 


Grahamite 


Quanovulite 


Huntilite 




Melanollte 


WlIK, F. J. 




Euralite 


WUTTIQ, 


Ixionolite 


Miascite 


WILLIAMS, J. F. 

Amphibole- 

anthophyllite 
Bathyilllte 


ZEPHAROVIUH, V. TOM 

Barrandite 
Oorynite 


Churchiie 


Diaphorite 


Manganpectolite 
Natroxonotlite 


Sphsrite 
Strakonitzita 


Pseudoleucite 


Syngenite 


WILLIAMS and 


ZINOKEN, C. F. 


BRACKETT 


Kainite 


See Brackbtt and 
Williams 


ZINOKEN,J. K.L. 


WINCKLER, 0. 


Arsenical copper 
Calcomalachite 


See Weirbaoh and 


Eugenesite 


WmCKIJEB 


Selenpalladium 


WOHLER. Fb. 


ZIPPE, F. X. M. 


Cryptolite 


Comwallite 


Laurite 


Hercynite 


I*yrochiore 


Rittingerite 


Fyrooonite 


Steininannite 




Uranbloom 


WOLFF, 


Vanadite 


OttreUte 


ZHtKEUF 


WOLLASTON. W. H. 


Hetairite 


FluelUte 


Pelosiderite 


Palladium 


Tricbite 



MINEBALOaY AND MINING. 

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